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A (New York City Subway service)

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"A" train symbol
Eighth Avenue Express
Views From The Rockaways.jpg
An R46 train on the A approaching Beach 60th Street
Map of the "A" train
Note: dashed line shows rush-hour-only service
Northern endInwood–207th Street
Southern endLefferts Boulevard, Far Rockaway, or Rockaway Park (limited rush-hour service)
Stations40
44 (rush hour services)
62 (late-night services)
Rolling stock226 R46s (27 trains, a.m. rush), 224 R46s (28 trains, p.m. rush)
8 R68As (1 train, p.m. only-used on the B for a.m. service)
110 R179s (11 trains)
10 R211As (1 train)[1][2][3]
(Rolling stock assignments subject to change)
DepotPitkin Yard
Started serviceSeptember 10, 1932; 90 years ago (1932-09-10)
Route map

Down arrow  A 
Inwood–207th Street
Dyckman Street
190th Street
181st Street
175th Street
switches to local tracks
during late nights
Down arrow  C 
168th Street
163rd Street–Amsterdam Avenue
155th Street
145th Street
135th Street
125th Street
116th Street
Cathedral Parkway–110th Street
103rd Street
96th Street
86th Street
81st Street–Museum of Natural History
72nd Street
59th Street–Columbus Circle
"E" train East Side & Queens via 53rd Street
50th Street
(Disabled access southbound)
42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal Port Authority Bus Terminal
34th Street–Penn Station MTA NYC logo.svg NJ Transit Amtrak
23rd Street
14th Street
West Fourth Street–Washington Square
Spring Street
Canal Street
switches to local tracks
during late nights
World Trade Center Port Authority Trans-Hudson | Chambers Street
Up arrow  E 
Fulton Street
High Street
Jay Street–MetroTech
Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets
switches to local tracks
during late nights
Lafayette Avenue
Clinton–Washington Avenues
Franklin Avenue
Nostrand Avenue
Kingston–Throop Avenues
Utica Avenue
Ralph Avenue
Rockaway Avenue
Broadway Junction
Liberty Avenue
Van Siclen Avenue
Shepherd Avenue
Euclid Avenue
Up arrow  C 
switches to local tracks
during late nights
Grant Avenue
80th Street
88th Street
Rockaway Boulevard
104th Street
111th Street
Ozone Park–Lefferts Boulevard
Up arrow  A 
Aqueduct Racetrack
(northbound only)
 
 
Aqueduct–North Conduit Avenue
Howard Beach–JFK Airport
AirTrain JFK notext logo.svg
Down arrow  S 
Broad Channel
Beach 67th Street
Beach 60th Street
Beach 44th Street
Beach 36th Street
Beach 25th Street
Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue
Up arrow  A 
Beach 90th Street
Beach 98th Street
Beach 105th Street
Rockaway Park–Beach 116th Street
Up arrow  S 
( A  rush hours)
Legend

Lines used by the "A" train and "C" train
Other services sharing tracks with the "A" train and "C" train
Unused lines, connections, or service patterns
 A 
Termini of services

Cross-platform interchange

Platforms on different levels

The A Eighth Avenue Express[4] is a rapid transit service in the B Division of the New York City Subway. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored blue since it uses the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan.[5]

The A operates at all times. Daytime service operates between 207th Street in Inwood, Manhattan and Mott Avenue in Far Rockaway, Queens or Lefferts Boulevard in Richmond Hill, Queens, making express stops in Manhattan and Brooklyn and local stops in Queens. Limited rush-hour service also operates to or from Beach 116th Street in Rockaway Park, Queens. Late night service operates only between 207th Street and Far Rockaway, making local stops along its entire route; during this time, a shuttle train (the Lefferts Boulevard Shuttle) operates between Euclid Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard.[a][6]

The A provides the longest one-seat ride in the system—at 32.39 miles (52.13 km), between Inwood and Far Rockaway—and has a weekday ridership of 600,000.[7]

Discover more about A (New York City Subway service) related topics

Rapid transit

Rapid transit

Rapid transit or mass rapid transit (MRT), also known as heavy rail or metro, is a type of high-capacity public transport generally found in urban areas. A rapid transit system that primarily or traditionally runs below the surface may be called a subway, tube, or underground. Unlike buses or trams, rapid transit systems are railways, usually electric, that operate on an exclusive right-of-way, which cannot be accessed by pedestrians or other vehicles. They are often grade-separated in tunnels or on elevated railways.

B Division (New York City Subway)

B Division (New York City Subway)

The New York City Subway's B Division consists of the lines that operate with lettered services, as well as the Franklin Avenue and Rockaway Park Shuttles. These lines and services were operated by the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) and city-owned Independent Subway System (IND) before the 1940 city takeover of the BMT. B Division rolling stock is wider, longer, and heavier than those of the A Division, measuring 10 or 9.75 ft by 60 or 75 ft.

New York City Subway

New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. It is owned by the government of New York City and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City Subway is one of the world's oldest public transit systems, one of the most-used, and the one with the most stations, with 472 stations in operation.

IND Eighth Avenue Line

IND Eighth Avenue Line

The IND Eighth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line in New York City, United States, and is part of the B Division of the New York City Subway. Opened in 1932, it was the first line of the Independent Subway System (IND), and the Eighth Avenue Subway name was also applied by New Yorkers to the entire IND system.

Manhattan

Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City. The borough is also coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. Located near the southern tip of New York State, Manhattan is based in the Eastern Time Zone and constitutes both the geographical and demographic center of the Northeast megalopolis and the urban core of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass. Over 58 million people live within 250 miles of Manhattan, which serves as New York City’s economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and the city’s historical birthplace. Residents of the outer boroughs of New York City often refer to Manhattan as "the city". Manhattan has been described as the cultural, financial, media, and entertainment capital of the world, and hosts the United Nations headquarters. Manhattan also serves as the headquarters of the global art market, with numerous art galleries and auction houses collectively hosting half of the world’s art auctions.

Inwood–207th Street station

Inwood–207th Street station

The Inwood–207th Street station is the northern terminal station of the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of 207th Street and Broadway in the Manhattan neighborhood of Inwood, near Inwood Hill Park, it is served by the A train at all times.

Inwood, Manhattan

Inwood, Manhattan

Inwood is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, at the northern tip of Manhattan Island, in the U.S. state of New York. It is bounded by the Hudson River to the west, Spuyten Duyvil Creek and Marble Hill to the north, the Harlem River to the east, and Washington Heights to the south.

Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue station

Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue station

The Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue station is the eastern terminal station of the New York City Subway's IND Rockaway Line. Originally a Long Island Rail Road station, it is currently the easternmost station in the New York City Subway. It is served by the A train at all times.

Far Rockaway, Queens

Far Rockaway, Queens

Far Rockaway is a neighborhood on the eastern part of the Rockaway peninsula in the New York City borough of Queens. It is the easternmost section of the Rockaways. The neighborhood extends from Beach 32nd Street east to the Nassau County line. Its southern boundary is the Atlantic Ocean; it is one of the neighborhoods along Rockaway Beach.

Ozone Park–Lefferts Boulevard station

Ozone Park–Lefferts Boulevard station

The Ozone Park–Lefferts Boulevard station is an elevated terminal station on the IND Fulton Street Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of Lefferts Boulevard and Liberty Avenue in Queens. It serves as the terminus of the A route's Lefferts Boulevard branch. Despite its name, the station is not actually located in Ozone Park, but rather in the adjacent neighborhood of South Richmond Hill.

Richmond Hill, Queens

Richmond Hill, Queens

Richmond Hill is a commercial and residential neighborhood located in the southwestern section of the New York City borough of Queens. The area borders Kew Gardens and Forest Park to the north, Jamaica and South Jamaica to the east, South Ozone Park to the south, and Woodhaven and Ozone Park to the west. The neighborhood is split between Queens Community Board 9 and 10.

Euclid Avenue station (IND Fulton Street Line)

Euclid Avenue station (IND Fulton Street Line)

The Euclid Avenue station is an express station on the IND Fulton Street Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of Euclid and Pitkin Avenues in East New York, Brooklyn. It is served by the A train at all times and is the southern terminal for the C train at all times except nights. During nights, this is the northern terminal for the Lefferts Boulevard shuttle train from Ozone Park, Queens.

History

Early history

Manhattan-bound A train of R179s at Broad Channel
Manhattan-bound A train of R179s at Broad Channel

The A and AA were the first services on the IND Eighth Avenue Line when it opened on September 10, 1932. The Independent Subway System (IND) used single letters to refer to express services and double letters for local services. The A ran express between 207th Street and Chambers Street, and the AA ran local between 168th Street and Chambers Street, known at the time as Hudson Terminal. During late-night hours (from 1:45 a.m. to 5:45 a.m.) and on Sundays, the A did not run and the AA made all stops along the line.[8][9]: 15 

The A was extended to Jay Street–Borough Hall when the Cranberry Street Tunnel to Brooklyn opened on February 1, 1933,[10][11] and to Bergen Street, when the extension opened on March 20.[12] On July 1, the A began running express at all times, stopping at 155th Street and 163rd Street during late nights.[9]: 82  The A was extended to Church Avenue on October 7.[13]

On April 9, 1936, the IND Fulton Street Line was opened to Rockaway Avenue.[14] The 1936 extension played an integral part in the establishment of Bedford-Stuyvesant as Brooklyn's central African American community. The A train connected Harlem, Manhattan's central African American community, to areas of Bedford-Stuyvesant that provided residential opportunities for African Americans not found throughout the rest of New York City.[15]

On December 30, 1946 and November 28, 1948, the line was extended to Broadway–East New York (now Broadway Junction) and Euclid Avenue, respectively.[16][9]: 82  On October 24, 1949, express service in Brooklyn to Broadway–East New York began with the A running express during rush hours, with the E extended to provide local service.[13][17]

Extensions to Ozone Park and the Rockaways

A poster commemorating the opening of the IND Rockaway Line
A poster commemorating the opening of the IND Rockaway Line

On April 29, 1956, Grant Avenue was opened and the line was extended over the BMT Fulton Street Line to Lefferts Boulevard.[18] On weekdays except midnights, alternate trains terminated at Lefferts Boulevard and at Euclid Avenue. During weekends, they terminated at Euclid Avenue with a shuttle to Lefferts Boulevard.[13][19]

Two months later, on June 28, 1956, the former Long Island Rail Road Rockaway Beach Branch, having been rebuilt to subway specifications,[20] began service to Rockaway Park[21] and Wavecrest (Beach 25th Street).[22][23] At this time, rush hour express service on the Fulton Street Line with the E train began.

On September 16, 1956, the A was extended to the Rockaways, replacing the E. At the time, alternate trains continued running to Lefferts Boulevard.[13] On January 27, 1957, non-rush hour through service to the Rockaways was discontinued and was replaced by a shuttle running between Euclid Avenue and Wavecrest (now Beach 25th Street). Non-rush hour A train service was now to Lefferts Boulevard.

On June 18, 1957, the New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA) announced plans to have Rockaway-bound A trains skip Grant Avenue, Hudson Street, and Boyd Street during rush hours on a one-month pilot, to take effect July 1. The change was made to determine whether ten minutes could be reduced off of travel times to the Rockaways; the NYCTA only believed it would save three minutes.[24][25] In the face of community opposition, the NYCTA announced that it would take more time to review the change, meaning that it ultimately did not take effect on July 1.[26]

On January 16, 1958, with the opening of the new terminal Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue, rush hour A service was extended. On September 8, 1958, the A train replaced the E train in the Rockaways again, and A trains resumed alternating between Euclid Avenue and Lefferts Boulevard. "Round-robin" service from Euclid Avenue to both Rockaway terminals began during non-rush hours, while through A service ran to Lefferts Boulevard.[27] On September 8, 1959, the A began to run local in Brooklyn during rush hours, making it local at all times in Brooklyn, as the E became express in Brooklyn during rush hours. On July 9, 1967, the A trains running to Euclid Avenue were extended to Far Rockaway middays, evenings, and weekends, replacing the HH shuttle on that branch.[28][29]

An A train of R68As at Chambers Street
An A train of R68As at Chambers Street
Lefferts Boulevard-bound A shuttle train of R46s at 80th Street
Lefferts Boulevard-bound A shuttle train of R46s at 80th Street

Simplifying service patterns

As part of systemwide changes in bus and subway service, major changes were made to A service in Brooklyn and Queens on January 2, 1973. The A train became the express service along Fulton Street and the E train became the local during rush hours.[30][31] Express service would be provided for a longer period during rush hours as the span of E service to Brooklyn, which would cover local stops, was also increased.[32] In addition, the A trips that terminated at Euclid Avenue during rush hours were extended to Far Rockaway, replacing E service. Service would now run to Far Rockaway between 5:30 a.m. and 11:30 p.m..[33][28] A trains would alternate between Lefferts Boulevard and Far Rockaway. These changes were initially supposed to take effect on September 11, 1972.[34]

On August 30, 1976, the CC became the Fulton Street Local during rush hours, replacing E service.[35] On August 27, 1977, the A began making local stops in Manhattan during late nights, when the AA was not running.[36]

On December 11, 1988, A trains began running local between 145th Street and 168th Street on weekends to replace the discontinued K (formerly AA) service, and express on the IND Fulton Street Line in Brooklyn during middays and rush hours, with the C providing local service during those times.[37] On September 30, 1990, A trains began operating local between 145th Street and 168th Street during weekday evenings.[38]

In 1991, at a series of meetings, the NYCTA presented proposed changes to A, C, and H service that would shorten the length of the C, simplify the service pattern during late nights to most efficiently serve the majority of riders, provide direct express service to Rockaway Park during rush hours in the peak direction, and provide shuttle connections during non-peak periods between Rockaway Park and through A train service. The service pattern devised was designed to improve operations by reducing route length and complexity, making service more attractive, simplifying confusing service patterns, and reducing transfers for passengers traveling during late nights.[39]

At the time, A service ran to Lefferts Boulevard and Far Rockaway during the day while the C ran to Rockaway Park during rush hours. During late nights, A service ran to Lefferts Boulevard, while service to both branches in the Rockaways was provided by round-robin H shuttle service to Euclid Avenue. As part of the changes proposed, round-robin shuttle service would be discontinued, through A late night service would run to Far Rockaway, and service to Lefferts Boulevard and Rockaway Park would be provided by separate shuttle services with timed transfers to through A service. Rush hour local C service to Rockaway Park would be replaced by through A express service that ran every 20 minutes in the peak direction for a period of one hour and twenty minutes in rush hours to and from 59th Street–Columbus Circle. The initial proposal had these trips terminate at 34th Street, but this was changed to 59th Street following public comments. These five rush hour express trips were marketed as a "commuter rail style service", and special efforts were to be made to follow the arrival and departure times listed in the route's timetable, which was publicly distributed to riders. In addition, H service to Rockaway Park would be replaced by the Rockaway Park Shuttle, which would run between Broad Channel and Rockaway Park, and C service would be truncated to Euclid Avenue.[39]

In April 1992, the MTA Board approved the proposed change to service in the Rockaways, which were expected to encourage ridership growth in the long term, and reduced NYCTA's annual operating budget by $20,000.[39] The changes took effect on October 23, 1992 with modification: Late night shuttle service to Lefferts Boulevard would terminate at Euclid Avenue, not Rockaway Boulevard.[40] Later on, the rush hour A trips to Rockaway Park were extended from 59th Street to Dyckman Street and Inwood–207th Street.[41]

On May 29, 1994, A trains began running express on weekends from 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. between 168th Street and 145th Street, with C trains trains being extended from 145th Street to 168th Street to cover local stops.[42] A corresponding change was made to weekday midday A service on April 30, 1995, though this change was discontinued on November 12, 1995. On March 1, 1998, A trains began running express between 168th Street and 145th Street during middays and early evenings, with local service provided by extended C service. On May 2, 1999, the A became the express on the Fulton Street Line at all times except late nights, and C service was extended from World Trade Center to Euclid Avenue during late weekday evenings and weekends to provide local service along the line.[28][7]

21st century

On January 23, 2005, a fire at the Chambers Street signal room crippled A and C service. Initial assessments suggested that it would take several years to restore normal service, but the damaged equipment was replaced with available spare parts, and normal service resumed on April 21.[43][44]

A service was affected by Hurricane Sandy in October 2012, due to extreme damage to the IND Rockaway Line. Trains that normally traveled to Far Rockaway or Rockaway Park terminated at Howard Beach–JFK Airport. Service to the Rockaways resumed on May 30, 2013.[45][46] The Far Rockaway part of the route was served by the temporary free H shuttle that ran between Far Rockaway and Beach 90th Street via the connecting track at Hammels Wye.[47][48][49]

As a result of a two-phase program of flood mitigation work along the Hammels Wye, between April 9 and May 18, 2018, limited rush hour A service to/from Rockaway Park was suspended.[b] The second phase, from July 1 to September 3, diverted all Far Rockaway-bound A trips to Rockaway Park, with Rockaway Park Shuttle trains being rerouted to the Far Rockaway branch through the southern leg of Hammels Wye.[50]

From midday on March 29, 2020[51][52] to April 28, 2020,[53] due to the suspension of C train service caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, A trains to Lefferts Boulevard ran local,[54] while A trains to the Rockaways ran express.[55]

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Manhattan

Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City. The borough is also coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. Located near the southern tip of New York State, Manhattan is based in the Eastern Time Zone and constitutes both the geographical and demographic center of the Northeast megalopolis and the urban core of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass. Over 58 million people live within 250 miles of Manhattan, which serves as New York City’s economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and the city’s historical birthplace. Residents of the outer boroughs of New York City often refer to Manhattan as "the city". Manhattan has been described as the cultural, financial, media, and entertainment capital of the world, and hosts the United Nations headquarters. Manhattan also serves as the headquarters of the global art market, with numerous art galleries and auction houses collectively hosting half of the world’s art auctions.

R179 (New York City Subway car)

R179 (New York City Subway car)

The R179 is a class of 318 New Technology Train subway cars built by Bombardier Transportation for the New York City Subway's B Division. Entering service between 2017 and 2020, the cars replaced all remaining R32s and R42s.

Broad Channel station

Broad Channel station

The Broad Channel station is a station on the IND Rockaway Line of the New York City Subway, located in the neighborhood of the same name at Noel and West Roads in the borough of Queens. It is served by the A train and the Rockaway Park Shuttle at all times, the latter of which originates/terminates here. Broad Channel originally opened in 1880 as a Long Island Railroad station. The LIRR discontinued service in 1950 after a fire on the trestle across Jamaica Bay, to the station's north. The station reopened June 28, 1956, as a subway station.

IND Eighth Avenue Line

IND Eighth Avenue Line

The IND Eighth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line in New York City, United States, and is part of the B Division of the New York City Subway. Opened in 1932, it was the first line of the Independent Subway System (IND), and the Eighth Avenue Subway name was also applied by New Yorkers to the entire IND system.

Independent Subway System

Independent Subway System

The Independent Subway System, formerly known as the Independent City-Owned Subway System (ICOSS) or the Independent City-Owned Rapid Transit Railroad (ICORTR), was a rapid transit rail system in New York City that is now part of the New York City Subway. It was first constructed as the Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan in 1932.

Inwood–207th Street station

Inwood–207th Street station

The Inwood–207th Street station is the northern terminal station of the IND Eighth Avenue Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of 207th Street and Broadway in the Manhattan neighborhood of Inwood, near Inwood Hill Park, it is served by the A train at all times.

Jay Street–MetroTech station

Jay Street–MetroTech station

The Jay Street–MetroTech station is a New York City Subway station complex on the IND Fulton Street, IND Culver, and BMT Fourth Avenue lines. The complex is located in the vicinity of MetroTech Center in Downtown Brooklyn. It is served by the:A, F, and R trains at all times C train at all times except late nights N train during late nights only A few rush-hour W and trains in the peak direction

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Brooklyn is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Kings County, in the U.S. state of New York. Kings County is the most populous county in the State of New York, and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, behind New York County (Manhattan). Brooklyn is also New York City's most populous borough, with 2,736,074 residents in 2020.

IND Fulton Street Line

IND Fulton Street Line

The IND Fulton Street Line is a rapid transit line of the IND Division of the New York City Subway, running from the Cranberry Street Tunnel under the East River through all of central Brooklyn to a terminus in Ozone Park, Queens. The IND Rockaway Line branches from it just east of Rockaway Boulevard. The A train runs express during daytime hours and local at night on the underground portion of the line; it runs local on the elevated portion of the line at all times. The C train runs local on the underground portion of the line at all times except late nights.

Harlem

Harlem

Harlem is a neighborhood in Upper Manhattan, New York City. It is bounded roughly by the Hudson River on the west; the Harlem River and 155th Street on the north; Fifth Avenue on the east; and Central Park North on the south. The greater Harlem area encompasses several other neighborhoods and extends west and north to 155th Street, east to the East River, and south to Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Central Park, and East 96th Street.

Route

Service pattern

The following table shows the lines used by the A, with shaded boxes indicating the route at the specified times:[c][56]

Line From To Tracks Times
Lefferts
Service
Rockaway
Services
all ex.
nights
late
nights
all ex.
nights
late
nights
rush
peak
IND Eighth Avenue Line (full line) Inwood–207th Street 168th Street all          
163rd Street–Amsterdam Avenue Canal Street express  
local        
Chambers Street High Street all      
IND Fulton Street Line (full line) Jay Street–MetroTech Shepherd Avenue express  
local        
Euclid Avenue all        
Grant Avenue Rockaway Boulevard local
104th Street Ozone Park–Lefferts Boulevard    
IND Rockaway Line (full line) Aqueduct Racetrack Howard Beach–JFK Airport          
Broad Channel all
Beach 67th Street Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue Most trains
Beach 90th Street Rockaway Park–Beach 116th Street     Limited service

Stations

For a more detailed station listing, see the articles on the lines listed above.[4]

For clarity, the A's branches are shown separately in the following table. The leftmost column shows the Lefferts Boulevard service; the second column shows the Far Rockaway service; and the third column shows the Rockaway Park service.

Station service legend
Stops all times Stops all times
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times except late nights
Stops late nights only Stops late nights only
Stops weekdays only Stops weekdays only
Station closed Station closed
Stops rush hours only Stops rush hours only (limited service)
Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Stops rush hours/weekdays in the peak direction only
Time period details
Disabled access Station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act
Disabled access ↑ Station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act
in the indicated direction only
Disabled access ↓
Aiga elevator.svg Elevator access to mezzanine only
A service to Lefferts Boulevard
Lef.
A service to Far Rockaway
FR
A service to Rockaway Park
RP
Stations Disabled access Subway transfers Connections/Other Notes
Manhattan
Eighth Avenue Line
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only ↑[d] Inwood–207th Street Disabled access Bx12 Select Bus Service
All northbound a.m. rush hour trains from Rockaway Park terminate at this station
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Dyckman Street Some peak-direction rush hour trips to/from Brooklyn and Queens begin or end their runs at this station[e]
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 190th Street Elevator access to mezzanine only
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 181st Street Elevator access to mezzanine only
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 175th Street Disabled access George Washington Bridge Bus Station
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 168th Street Disabled access C all except late nights
1 all times (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line)
Some peak-direction rush hour trips to Brooklyn and Queens begin or end their runs at this station[e]
| Stops late nights only | 163rd Street–Amsterdam Avenue
| Stops late nights only | 155th Street Bx6 Select Bus Service
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 145th Street C all except late nights
B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.D all times (IND Concourse Line)
| Stops late nights only | 135th Street
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 125th Street Disabled access B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.C all except late nightsD all times M60 Select Bus Service to LaGuardia Airport
| Stops late nights only | 116th Street
| Stops late nights only | Cathedral Parkway–110th Street
| Stops late nights only | 103rd Street
| Stops late nights only | 96th Street
| Stops late nights only | 86th Street M86 Select Bus Service
| Stops late nights only | 81st Street–Museum of Natural History M79 Select Bus Service
| Stops late nights only | 72nd Street
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 59th Street–Columbus Circle Disabled access B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.C all except late nightsD all times
1 all times2 late nights (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line)
| Stops late nights only | 50th Street Disabled access ↓ E all times (IND Queens Boulevard Line) Station is ADA-accessible in the southbound direction only.
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 42nd Street–Port Authority Bus Terminal Disabled access C all except late nightsE all times
1 all times2 all times3 all times (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line)
7 all times rush hours until 9:30 p.m., peak direction​ (IRT Flushing Line)
N all timesQ all timesR all except late nightsW weekdays only (BMT Broadway Line)
S all except late nights (42nd Street Shuttle)
at Times Square–42nd Street
B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.D all timesF all times two rush hour trains, peak directionM weekdays until 9:00 p.m. (IND Sixth Avenue Line at 42nd Street–Bryant Park, daytime only)
Port Authority Bus Terminal
M34A Select Bus Service
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 34th Street–Penn Station Disabled access C all except late nightsE all times M34/M34A Select Bus Service
Amtrak, LIRR, NJ Transit at Pennsylvania Station
| Stops late nights only | 23rd Street E all times M23 Select Bus Service
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 14th Street Disabled access C all except late nightsE all times
L all times (BMT Canarsie Line at Eighth Avenue)
M14A/D Select Bus Service
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only West Fourth Street–Washington Square Disabled access C all except late nightsE all times
B weekdays until 11:00 p.m.D all timesF all times two rush hour trains, peak directionM weekdays until 9:00 p.m. (IND Sixth Avenue Line)
PATH at Ninth Street
| Stops late nights only | Spring Street E all times
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Canal Street C all except late nightsE all times
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Chambers Street Elevator access to mezzanine only C all except late nights
E all times (at World Trade Center)[f]
2 all times3 all except late nights (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line at Park Place)
N late nightsR all except late nightsW weekdays only (BMT Broadway Line at Cortlandt Street)
PATH at World Trade Center
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Fulton Street Disabled access C all except late nights
2 all times3 all except late nights (IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line)
4 all times5 all except late nights (IRT Lexington Avenue Line)
J all timesZ rush hours, peak direction (BMT Nassau Street Line)
PATH at World Trade Center
Brooklyn
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only High Street C all except late nights NYC Ferry: East River and South Brooklyn routes (at Old Fulton Street and Furman Street)
Fulton Street Line
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Jay Street–MetroTech Disabled access C all except late nights F all times two rush hour trains, peak direction
N late nights R all timesW limited rush hour service only (BMT Fourth Avenue Line)
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Hoyt–Schermerhorn Streets Elevator access to mezzanine only C all except late nights
G all times (IND Crosstown Line)
| Stops late nights only | Lafayette Avenue
| Stops late nights only | Clinton–Washington Avenues
| Stops late nights only | Franklin Avenue Disabled access S all times (BMT Franklin Avenue Line)
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Nostrand Avenue C all except late nights B44 Select Bus Service, LIRR Atlantic Branch at Nostrand Avenue
| Stops late nights only | Kingston–Throop Avenues B15 bus to JFK Int'l Airport
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Utica Avenue Disabled access C all except late nights B46 Select Bus Service
| Stops late nights only | Ralph Avenue
| Stops late nights only | Rockaway Avenue
Stops all times except late nights Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Broadway Junction C all except late nights
J all timesZ rush hours, peak direction (BMT Jamaica Line)
L all times (BMT Canarsie Line)
| Stops late nights only | Liberty Avenue
| Stops late nights only | Van Siclen Avenue
| Stops late nights only | Shepherd Avenue
Stops all times Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Euclid Avenue Disabled access C all except late nights Northern terminal for the late night Lefferts Boulevard Shuttle, one evening trip from Far Rockaway, and three morning trips to Far Rockaway
Stops all times Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Grant Avenue
Queens
Stops all times Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 80th Street
Stops all times Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only 88th Street
Stops all times Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Rockaway Boulevard Q52/Q53 Select Bus Service
Services to Lefferts Boulevard and The Rockaways split
Stops all times 104th Street
Stops all times 111th Street
Stops all times Ozone Park–Lefferts Boulevard Disabled access Q10 bus to JFK Airport
Rockaway Line
Stops all times ↑ Stops rush hours in the peak direction only ↑ Aqueduct Racetrack Disabled access ↑ Station serves northbound trains only
Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Aqueduct–North Conduit Avenue
Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Howard Beach–JFK Airport JFK Airport Disabled access AirTrain JFK
Stops all times Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Broad Channel S all times (Rockaway Park Shuttle) Q52/Q53 Select Bus Service
Services to Far Rockaway and Rockaway Park split
Far Rockaway Branch
Stops all times Beach 67th Street Q52 Select Bus Service
Stops all times Beach 60th Street Q52 Select Bus Service
Stops all times Beach 44th Street
Stops all times Beach 36th Street
Stops all times Beach 25th Street
Stops all times Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue Disabled access LIRR Far Rockaway Branch at Far Rockaway
Rockaway Park Branch (rush hour service only)
Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Beach 90th Street S all times (Rockaway Park Shuttle) Q52 Select Bus Service
Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Beach 98th Street S all times (Rockaway Park Shuttle) Q53 Select Bus Service
Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Beach 105th Street S all times (Rockaway Park Shuttle) Q53 Select Bus Service
Stops rush hours in the peak direction only Rockaway Park–Beach 116th Street Disabled access S all times (Rockaway Park Shuttle) Q53 Select Bus Service
NYC Ferry: East River and South Brooklyn routes (on Beach Channel Drive and Beach 108th Street)

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IND Eighth Avenue Line

IND Eighth Avenue Line

The IND Eighth Avenue Line is a rapid transit line in New York City, United States, and is part of the B Division of the New York City Subway. Opened in 1932, it was the first line of the Independent Subway System (IND), and the Eighth Avenue Subway name was also applied by New Yorkers to the entire IND system.

IND Fulton Street Line

IND Fulton Street Line

The IND Fulton Street Line is a rapid transit line of the IND Division of the New York City Subway, running from the Cranberry Street Tunnel under the East River through all of central Brooklyn to a terminus in Ozone Park, Queens. The IND Rockaway Line branches from it just east of Rockaway Boulevard. The A train runs express during daytime hours and local at night on the underground portion of the line; it runs local on the elevated portion of the line at all times. The C train runs local on the underground portion of the line at all times except late nights.

IND Rockaway Line

IND Rockaway Line

The IND Rockaway Line is a rapid transit line of the IND Division of the New York City Subway, operating in Queens. It branches from the IND Fulton Street Line at Rockaway Boulevard, extending over the Jamaica Bay, into the Rockaways. The A train serves the line on the Far Rockaway–Mott Avenue branch and north of Hammels Wye. The Rockaway Park Shuttle runs between Broad Channel and Rockaway Park–Beach 116th Street. Five rush hour A trains provide service between Rockaway Park and Manhattan in the peak direction.

In popular culture

"Take the 'A' Train" is a jazz standard by Billy Strayhorn, referring to the A train, going at that time from eastern Brooklyn up into Harlem and northern Manhattan, using the express tracks in Manhattan. It became the signature tune of Duke Ellington and often opened the shows of Ella Fitzgerald.[58] Part of the significance of this is sociological; it connected Harlem and Bedford–Stuyvesant, the two largest African American neighborhoods in New York City.

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Take the "A" Train

Take the "A" Train

"Take the 'A' Train" is a jazz standard by Billy Strayhorn that was the signature tune of the Duke Ellington orchestra.

Jazz standard

Jazz standard

Jazz standards are musical compositions that are an important part of the musical repertoire of jazz musicians, in that they are widely known, performed, and recorded by jazz musicians, and widely known by listeners. There is no definitive list of jazz standards, and the list of songs deemed to be standards changes over time. Songs included in major fake book publications and jazz reference works offer a rough guide to which songs are considered standards.

Billy Strayhorn

Billy Strayhorn

William Thomas Strayhorn was an American jazz composer, pianist, lyricist, and arranger, who collaborated with bandleader and composer Duke Ellington for nearly three decades. His compositions include "Take the 'A' Train", "Chelsea Bridge", "A Flower Is a Lovesome Thing", and "Lush Life".

Duke Ellington

Duke Ellington

Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington was an American jazz pianist, composer, and leader of his eponymous jazz orchestra from 1923 through the rest of his life.

Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Fitzgerald

Ella Jane Fitzgerald was an American jazz singer, sometimes referred to as the "First Lady of Song", "Queen of Jazz", and "Lady Ella". She was noted for her purity of tone, impeccable diction, phrasing, timing, intonation, and a "horn-like" improvisational ability, particularly in her scat singing.

Harlem

Harlem

Harlem is a neighborhood in Upper Manhattan, New York City. It is bounded roughly by the Hudson River on the west; the Harlem River and 155th Street on the north; Fifth Avenue on the east; and Central Park North on the south. The greater Harlem area encompasses several other neighborhoods and extends west and north to 155th Street, east to the East River, and south to Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Central Park, and East 96th Street.

Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

Bedford–Stuyvesant, Brooklyn

Bedford–Stuyvesant, colloquially known as Bed–Stuy, is a neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City borough of Brooklyn. Bedford–Stuyvesant is bordered by Flushing Avenue to the north, Classon Avenue to the west, Broadway to the east, and Atlantic Avenue to the south. The main shopping street, Fulton Street runs east–west the length of the neighborhood and intersects high-traffic north–south streets including Bedford Avenue, Nostrand Avenue, and Stuyvesant Avenue. Bedford–Stuyvesant contains four smaller neighborhoods: Bedford, Stuyvesant Heights, Ocean Hill, and Weeksville. Part of Clinton Hill was once considered part of Bedford–Stuyvesant.

Source: "A (New York City Subway service)", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 20th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_(New_York_City_Subway_service).

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Notes
  1. ^ The separate shuttle service is identified on the late night map as NYCS-bull-trans-A gray.svg, and in the schedule and on trains as NYCS-bull-trans-S blue.svg.
  2. ^ Limited rush-hour service that normally begins or ends at Rockaway Park began or ended at Euclid Avenue instead.
  3. ^ There are several local A trains each late evening and early mornings which travel to and from Lefferts Boulevard.
  4. ^ Northbound trains from Rockaway Park end at 207th Street, but southbound trains to Rockaway Park begin at either Dyckman or 168th Streets
  5. ^ a b Trains terminate at this station during the a.m. rush and originate at this station during the p.m. rush
  6. ^ Chambers Street–World Trade Center are actually counted as two separate stations by the MTA. E trains terminate at World Trade Center while A and ​C trains have through service at Chambers Street.[57]
References
  1. ^ 'Subdivision 'B' Car Assignment Effective December 19, 2021'. New York City Transit, Operations Planning. December 17, 2021.
  2. ^ "Subdivision 'B' Car Assignments: Cars Required November 1, 2021" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 64 (12): 3. December 2021. Retrieved December 3, 2021.
  3. ^ "MTA on Twitter "That moment when you're waiting for the train and ✨this✨ pulls up"". Twitter. Retrieved March 10, 2022.
  4. ^ a b "A Subway Timetable, Effective June 26, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved August 1, 2022.
  5. ^ "mta.info - Line Colors". mta.info.
  6. ^ "Late Night Subway Service" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Review of the A and C Lines" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. December 11, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2016.
  8. ^ "Gay Midnight Crowd Rides First Trains in New Subway". The New York Times. September 10, 1932. p. 1.
  9. ^ a b c Cunningham, Joseph; DeHart, Leonard O. (1993). A History of the New York City Subway System. J. Schmidt, R. Giglio, and K. Lang.
  10. ^ "CITY OPENS SUBWAY TO BROOKLYN TODAY; Regular Express Service on the Extension of Independent Line Starts at 6:05 A.M. 3 LARGE STATIONS ADDED Fast Trains to Make Run From 207th St. to Borough Hall in 37 Minutes. 43 MORE MEN ON JOBS Officials Look for Rise in income as Financial District Is Brought Into New Route". The New York Times. February 1, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  11. ^ "NEW SUBWAY LINK OPENS WEDNESDAY; Independent Line Will Offer Express Service to Borough Hall in Brooklyn. KEY STATION TO BE ADDED Broadway-Nassau St. Platform to Connect With B.M.T. and East and West Side I.R.T. ADDED REVENUE EXPECTED 2-Way Rush-Hour Traffic Hoped For by Officials -- Local Trains to Be Speeded Slightly". The New York Times. January 29, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  12. ^ "CITY SUBWAY OPENS NEW LINK MARCH 20; Brooklyn Extension to Bergen and Smith Streets to Add One More Station. RISE IN REVENUE CERTAIN Further Cut Into Traffic of Rival Systems at Terminal Point Is Predicted. GROWTH WILL CONTINUE Station-by-Siation Completion to Church Avenue Before September Is Planned". The New York Times. March 12, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  13. ^ a b c d "NYCT Line by Line History". erictb.info.
  14. ^ "NEW SUBWAY LINK OPENED BY MAYOR; He Tells 15,000 in Brooklyn It Will Be Extended to Queens When Red Tape Is Cut". The New York Times. April 9, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 25, 2018.
  15. ^ Echanove, Matias. "Bed-Stuy on the Move" Archived September 16, 2017, at the Wayback Machine. Master thesis. Urban Planning Program. Columbia University. Urbanology.org. 2003.
  16. ^ Williams, Keith. "Weaving the Broadway Junction tapestry". The Weekly Nabe. Retrieved August 6, 2012.
  17. ^ "IND Faster Service Will Start Sunday" (PDF). The New York Times. October 20, 1949. Retrieved February 20, 2016.
  18. ^ "Notice To Passengers". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. April 1956. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  19. ^ "First Leg of Rockaways Transit Opened at Cost of $10,154,702; Station and Subway Section Put Into Use--Service Is Expected on June 28". The New York Times. April 30, 1956. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  20. ^ "PRR Chronology, 1956" (PDF). (45.9 KiB), December 2004 Edition
  21. ^ "ROCKAWAY PARK". arrts-arrchives.com.
  22. ^ "LONG ISLAND STATION HISTORY". trainsarefun.com. Archived from the original on May 26, 2017. Retrieved May 6, 2014.
  23. ^ Freejman), Ira Henry (June 29, 1956). "FREE RIDE OPENS ROCKAWAYS LINE; Fete Marks Longest Single Extension of Rapid Transit in History of the City Commissioner's Children Help Mayor Arrives Late". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 20, 2016.
  24. ^ "IND Time Test to Skip 3 Brooklyn Stations". New York Daily News. June 19, 1957. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  25. ^ "Rockaway Transit Speedup Assailed". New York Daily News. June 25, 1957. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  26. ^ "TA Puts Off Speedup For Rockaway Line". New York Daily News. June 27, 1957. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  27. ^ Linder, Bernard (October 1968). "Independent Subway Service History" (PDF). New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association.
  28. ^ a b c Chiasson, George (February 2012). "History of the A Train" (PDF). The Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 55 (2).
  29. ^ "Train Stepup To Far Rock". New York Daily News. July 5, 1967. Retrieved January 2, 2020.
  30. ^ "Subway Schedules In Queens Changing Amid Some Protest". The New York Times. January 2, 1973. p. 46. Retrieved March 20, 2010.
  31. ^ "Changes Set for Jan. 2 Praised" (PDF). The New York Times. November 25, 1972. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
  32. ^ "To serve you better... ....On E and F Trains in Queens and Manhattan". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. 1972. Retrieved December 23, 2022.
  33. ^ "To serve you better... Changes in subway service will become effective 6 AM Tues, Jan. 2". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. 1972. Retrieved December 23, 2022.
  34. ^ "Improved Service Begins Sept 11". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. 1972. Retrieved December 23, 2022.
  35. ^ "Service Adjustment on BMT and IND Lines Effective 1 A.M. Monday, Aug. 30". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. August 1976. Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  36. ^ "Service Adjustments on the BMT and IND Lines Effective Midnight, Saturday, August 27". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. 1977. Retrieved June 9, 2016.
  37. ^ "System-Wide Changes In Subway Service Effective Sunday, December 11, 1988". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. 1988. Retrieved June 17, 2016.
  38. ^ "Service Changes September 30, 1990" (PDF). subwaynut.com. New York City Transit Authority. September 30, 1990. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 26, 2014. Retrieved May 1, 2016.
  39. ^ a b c *Transit Authority Committee Agenda April 1992. New York City Transit Authority. April 16, 1992. pp. E.1.
  40. ^ "October 1992 New York City Subway Map". Flickr. New York City Transit Authority. October 1992. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  41. ^ "A Subway Timetable" (PDF). mta.info.
  42. ^ "May 1994 Subway Map". Flickr. New York City Transit. May 1994. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  43. ^ Chan, Sewell (January 25, 2005). "2 Subway Lines Crippled by Fire; Long Repair Seen". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 23, 2016.
  44. ^ "Remembering a fire at Chambers St". Second Ave. Sagas. August 24, 2010.
  45. ^ "Rebuilding the Rockaways After Hurricane Sandy". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original on November 29, 2012. Retrieved November 18, 2012.
  46. ^ Cuomo: MTA To Restore A Train Subway Service To The Rockaways May 30
  47. ^ "MTA on Twitter". Twitter.
  48. ^ "Hurricane Sandy Recovery Service. As of November 20" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 23, 2013.
  49. ^ "MTA News". mta.info.
  50. ^ "Train Change: A/ Shuttle Service to be Impacted Starting in April". The Rockaway Times. March 8, 2018. Archived from the original on April 29, 2020. Retrieved March 30, 2018.
  51. ^ "MANH/BKLYN, A and C Train, No C Train Service". mymtaalerts.com. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 29, 2020. Archived from the original on April 29, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  52. ^ Berger, Paul (March 31, 2020). "New York Transit Struggles Under Coronavirus Worker Shortage". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  53. ^ Martinez, Jose (April 28, 2020). "Subway Service Slowly Gets Back On Track As Transit Workers Return". The City. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  54. ^ "Update: QNS, C Train, No Scheduled Service". mymtaalerts.com. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. April 28, 2020. Archived from the original on April 29, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  55. ^ "A 8 Avenue Express". transitfeeds.com. Open Mobility Data. April 28, 2020. Archived from the original on April 28, 2020. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  56. ^ "Subway Service Guide" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. September 2019. Retrieved September 22, 2019.
  57. ^ "Station Complexes". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. May 28, 2019. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  58. ^ Cohen, Billie (January 2, 2008). "The A Train". The New York Times. Retrieved October 14, 2015.
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