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A. B. Guthrie Jr.

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A. B. Guthrie Jr.
A. B. Guthrie 1923 (page 32 crop).jpg
BornJanuary 13, 1901
DiedApril 26, 1991
Alma materUniversity of Montana
OccupationAuthor

Alfred Bertram Guthrie Jr. (January 13, 1901 – April 26, 1991) was an American novelist, screenwriter, historian, and literary historian known for writing western stories. His novel The Way West won the 1950 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, and his screenplay for Shane (1953) was nominated for an Academy Award.

Discover more about A. B. Guthrie Jr. related topics

Novelist

Novelist

A novelist is an author or writer of novels, though often novelists also write in other genres of both fiction and non-fiction. Some novelists are professional novelists, thus make a living writing novels and other fiction, while others aspire to support themselves in this way or write as an avocation. Most novelists struggle to have their debut novel published, but once published they often continue to be published, although very few become literary celebrities, thus gaining prestige or a considerable income from their work.

Screenwriter

Screenwriter

A screenplay writer is a writer who practices the craft of screenwriting, writing screenplays on which mass media, such as films, television programs and video games, are based.

Historian

Historian

A historian is a person who studies and writes about the past and is regarded as an authority on it. Historians are concerned with the continuous, methodical narrative and research of past events as relating to the human race; as well as the study of all history in time. Some historians are recognized by publications or training and experience. "Historian" became a professional occupation in the late nineteenth century as research universities were emerging in Germany and elsewhere.

Literature

Literature

Literature is any collection of written work, but it is also used more narrowly for writings specifically considered to be an art form, especially prose fiction, drama, and poetry. In recent centuries, the definition has expanded to include oral literature, much of which has been transcribed. Literature is a method of recording, preserving, and transmitting knowledge and entertainment, and can also have a social, psychological, spiritual, or political role.

Western (genre)

Western (genre)

The Western is a genre of fiction set in the American frontier and commonly associated with folk tales of the Western United States, particularly the Southwestern United States, as well as Northern Mexico and Western Canada. It is commonly referred to as the "Old West" or the "Wild West" and depicted in Western media as a hostile, sparsely populated frontier in a state of near-total lawlessness patrolled by outlaws, sheriffs, and numerous other stock "gunslinger" characters. Western narratives often concern the gradual attempts to tame the crime-ridden American West using wider themes of justice, freedom, rugged individualism, Manifest Destiny, and the national history and identity of the United States.

The Way West

The Way West

The Way West is a 1949 western novel by A. B. Guthrie, Jr. The book won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1950 and became the basis for a film starring Kirk Douglas, Robert Mitchum, and Richard Widmark.

Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It recognizes distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life, published during the preceding calendar year.

Shane (film)

Shane (film)

Shane is a 1953 American Technicolor Western film starring Alan Ladd, Jean Arthur and Van Heflin. Released by Paramount Pictures, the film is noted for its landscape cinematography, editing, performances, and contributions to the genre. The picture was produced and directed by George Stevens from a screenplay by A. B. Guthrie Jr., based on the 1949 novel of the same name by Jack Schaefer. Its Oscar-winning cinematography was by Loyal Griggs.

Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

The Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay is the Academy Award for the best screenplay adapted from previously established material. The most frequently adapted media are novels, but other adapted narrative formats include stage plays, musicals, short stories, TV series, and even other films and film characters. All sequels are also considered adaptations by this standard.

Biography

Guthrie was born in 1901 in Bedford, Indiana. When he was six months old he relocated with his parents to Montana,[1] where his father became the first principal of the Teton County Free High School in Choteau.[2] His father was a graduate of Indiana University, his mother from Earlham College at Richmond, Indiana.[2]: 1 

A constant reader, Guthrie tried to write while in high school, "fiction pretty much, some essays, but I majored in journalism. My father had been a newspaper man for four years in this little town in Kentucky, and I guess he thought it was the way to become a writer".[3]:3

In 1919, Guthrie entered the University of Washington, then transferred to the University of Montana, where he was a member of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity[4] and graduated with honors in 1923.[5] He worked odd jobs for the next few years.[5]

In 1926, Guthrie took out a $300 bank loan and moved to Lexington, Kentucky,[2]: 70  where he took a job at the Lexington Leader newspaper.[2]: 77  For the next 21 years he worked as a reporter, the city editor, and an editorial writer for the Leader.[5][6] Guthrie published his first novel Murders at Moon Dance in 1943.[2]: 128 [6][7]

In 1944, while still at the Leader, Guthrie won the Nieman Fellowship from Harvard,[5][8] and spent the year at the university studying writing.[6] While at Harvard he made friends with English professor Theodore Morrison,[2]: 104  "who knew so much about writing, probably more than I ever will."[3]:3 Morrison mentored Guthrie and helped him transition from journalism to fiction.[6][9]

During his year at Harvard Guthrie began his novel The Big Sky, which was published in 1947.[6][9] Guthrie later wrote, "It wasn't until I went to Harvard that I got in gear. Then I went back and worked for the newspaper for another year or so."[3]:4

At the Lexington Leader Guthrie's boss was very understanding and as long as Guthrie performed his news duties satisfactorily he was allowed to take his afternoons off to write fiction.[3]:18 After publication of The Big Sky Guthrie left the paper and supported himself by teaching creative writing at University of Kentucky.[5] During this time he published The Way West which won the 1950 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction.[6][10] He quit teaching in 1952 to devote his full-time to writing,[5] and moved back to Choteau, Montana, because he said it was his "point of outlook on the universe".[3]: 8  He split his residence between Choteau and Great Falls, Montana, an hour away from Choteau.[11]

Guthrie continued to write predominantly western subjects. He worked for a time in Hollywood, writing the screenplays for Shane (1953, for which he was nominated for an Academy Award) and The Kentuckian (1955).[5]

His other books included These Thousand Hills (1956), The Blue Hen's Chick (1965), Arfive (1970), The Last Valley (1975), Fair Land, Fair Land (1982), Murder in the Cotswolds (1989), and A Field Guide to Writing Fiction (1991).[5][6] His first collection of short stories, The Big It and Other Stories, was published in 1960.[5]

Guthrie died in 1991, at age 90, at his ranch near Choteau.[5][6]

Discover more about Biography related topics

Bedford, Indiana

Bedford, Indiana

Bedford is a city in Shawswick Township and the county seat of Lawrence County, Indiana, United States. In the 2020 census, the population was 13,792. That is up from 13,413 in 2010. Bedford is the principal city of the Bedford, IN Micropolitan Statistical Area, which comprises all of Lawrence County.

Choteau, Montana

Choteau, Montana

Choteau is a city in and the county seat of Teton County, Montana, United States. It lies along U.S. Routes 89 and 287, approximately 20 miles (32 km) east of the Rocky Mountains, near Flathead National Forest, the Rocky Mountain Division of Lewis and Clark National Forest, and Glacier National Park. The population was 1,721 at the 2020 census.

Indiana University

Indiana University

Indiana University (IU) is a system of public universities in the U.S. state of Indiana.

Earlham College

Earlham College

Earlham College is a private liberal arts college in Richmond, Indiana. The college was established in 1847 by the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) and has a strong focus on Quaker values such as integrity, a commitment to peace and social justice, mutual respect, and community decision-making. It offers a Master of Arts in Teaching and has an affiliated graduate seminary, the Earlham School of Religion, which offers three master's degrees: Master of Divinity, Master of Ministry, and Master of Arts in Religion.

Richmond, Indiana

Richmond, Indiana

Richmond is a city in eastern Wayne County, Indiana, United States. Bordering the state of Ohio, it is the county seat of Wayne County. In the 2020 census, the city had a population of 35,720. Situated largely within Wayne Township, its area includes a non-contiguous portion in nearby Boston Township, where Richmond Municipal Airport is currently located. It is the principal city of the Richmond micropolitan area.

Phi Sigma Kappa

Phi Sigma Kappa

Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣΚ), colloquially known as Phi Sig or PSK, is a men's social and academic fraternity with approximately 74 active chapters and provisional chapters in North America. Most of its first two dozen chapters were granted to schools in New England and Pennsylvania; therefore its early development was strongly Eastern in character, eventually operating chapters at six of the eight Ivy League schools as well as more egalitarian state schools. It later expanded to the South and West.

Lexington, Kentucky

Lexington, Kentucky

Lexington is a city in Kentucky, United States that is the county seat of Fayette County. By population, it is the second-largest city in Kentucky and 59th-largest city in the United States. By land area, it is the country's 28th-largest city. The city is also known as "Horse Capital of the World". It is within the state's Bluegrass region. Notable locations in the city include the Kentucky Horse Park, The Red Mile and Keeneland race courses, Rupp Arena, Central Bank Center, Transylvania University, the University of Kentucky, Bluegrass Community and Technical College, and the National Thoroughbred Racing Association (NTRA) Headquarters.

The Big Sky (novel)

The Big Sky (novel)

The Big Sky is a 1947 Western novel by A. B. Guthrie Jr. It is the first of six novels in Guthrie's sequence dealing with the Oregon Trail and the development of Montana from 1830, the time of the mountain men, to "the cattle empire of the 1880s to the near present." The first three books of the six in chronological story sequence — The Big Sky, The Way West, and Fair Land, Fair Land — are in themselves a complete trilogy, starting in the 1830s and ending in the 1870s.

Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

Pulitzer Prize for Fiction

The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction is one of the seven American Pulitzer Prizes that are annually awarded for Letters, Drama, and Music. It recognizes distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life, published during the preceding calendar year.

Shane (film)

Shane (film)

Shane is a 1953 American Technicolor Western film starring Alan Ladd, Jean Arthur and Van Heflin. Released by Paramount Pictures, the film is noted for its landscape cinematography, editing, performances, and contributions to the genre. The picture was produced and directed by George Stevens from a screenplay by A. B. Guthrie Jr., based on the 1949 novel of the same name by Jack Schaefer. Its Oscar-winning cinematography was by Loyal Griggs.

Academy Awards

Academy Awards

The Academy Awards, also known as the Oscars, are awards for artistic and technical merit for the film industry. They are presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS), in recognition of excellence in cinematic achievements as assessed by the Academy's voting membership. The Academy Awards are regarded by many as the most prestigious, significant awards in the entertainment industry in the United States and worldwide. The Oscar statuette depicts a knight rendered in the Art Deco style.

Fair Land, Fair Land

Fair Land, Fair Land

Fair Land, Fair Land is a 1982 Western novel by A. B. Guthrie, Jr. It is one in a sequence of six books dealing with the Oregon Trail and the development of Montana from 1830, the time of the mountain men, to "the cattle empire of the 1880s to the near present".

Source: "A. B. Guthrie Jr.", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, October 27th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A._B._Guthrie_Jr..

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Bibliography

Western Novels

Western Mystery Novellas

  • Murders at Moon Dance (1943)
  • Wild Pitch (1974), featuring Sheriff Chick Charleston
  • The Genuine Article (1977), featuring Sheriff Chick Charleston
  • No Second Wind (1980), featuring Sheriff Chick Charleston
  • Playing Catch-up (1985), featuring Sheriff Chick Charleston
  • Murder in the Cotswolds (1989), featuring Sheriff Chick Charleston

Short-story collections

  • The Big It, and Other Stories (1960), "Bargain" (originally titled "Bargain at Moon Dance")[12]

Non-fiction

  • The Blue Hen's Chick (1965)
  • Big Sky, Fair Land: The Environmental Essays of A. B. Guthrie Jr., edited by David Peterson (1988)
  • A Field Guide to Writing Fiction (1991)

Children's books

  • The Big Sky: An Edition For Young Readers (1950)
  • Once Upon a Pond (1973)

Poetry

  • Four Miles from Ear Mountain (1987)

Screenplays

Spoken word

  • A. B. Guthrie Jr., reads from THE BIG SKY (Caedmon, 1974)
References
  1. ^ Tribune Staff. "125 Montana Newsmakers: A. B. Guthrie Jr". Great Falls Tribune. Retrieved August 28, 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Guthrie, Jr., A.B. (1965). The Blue Hen's Chick, an Autobiography. New York: McGraw Hill. p. 1. ISBN 0803270380. Retrieved 9 December 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d e Henry-Mead, Jean (1988). Maverick writers. Caldwell, Idaho: Caxton Printers. ISBN 9780870043314. OCLC 1200488008.
  4. ^ Phi Sigma Kappa, ed. (1986). Hills and a Star (8 ed.). Indianapolis, Indiana: Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity. pp. 76–78.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Severo, Richard (April 27, 1991). "A.B. Guthrie Jr. Is Dead at 90; Won Pulitzer for 'The Way West'". The New York Times. Retrieved 9 December 2017.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h "A. B. Guthrie Jr., 90; Pulitzer Winner Wrote of Old West". The Los Angeles Times (from Associated Press). April 27, 1991. Retrieved December 9, 2017.
  7. ^ Elements of literature: First Course (Textbook). Austin, Texas: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. 1997. p. 240. ISBN 0-03-096829-1.
  8. ^ "Nieman Pulitzer Winners". Nieman Foundation. Harvard University. Retrieved 9 December 2017.
  9. ^ a b Keller, Julia (September 24, 2013). "The Nieman Factor". Nieman Reports. Summer-Fall 2013. Retrieved 9 December 2017.
  10. ^ "1950 Pulitzer Prizes". pulitzer.org. Columbia University. Retrieved 9 December 2017.
  11. ^ Crutchfield, James A. (2016-12-01). It Happened in Montana. Rowman & Littlefield. p. 109. ISBN 978-1-4930-2356-1.
  12. ^ "Bargain at Moon Dance | Esquire | OCTOBER, 1952". Esquire | The Complete Archive. Retrieved 4 September 2020.
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