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8 Spruce Street

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8 Spruce Street
(New York by Gehry)
8 Spruce Street (01030p).jpg
General information
StatusCompleted
TypeMixed-use
Architectural styleDeconstructivism
Address8 Spruce Street
Manhattan, New York City 10038
CoordinatesCoordinates: 40°42′39″N 74°00′20″W / 40.71083°N 74.00556°W / 40.71083; -74.00556
Construction started2006
Completed2010
OpeningFebruary 2011
Owner8 Spruce (NY) Owner LLC
ManagementFirst Service Residential
Height
Roof870 ft (265 m)[1][2][3]
Top floor827 ft (252 m)
Technical details
Floor count76
Floor area1,000,000 sq ft (93,000 m2)
Design and construction
Architect(s)Frank Gehry
DeveloperForest City Ratner
EngineerJaros, Baum & Bolles (MEP)
Structural engineerWSP Cantor Seinuk
Main contractorKreisler Borg Florman
Website
Official website

8 Spruce Street, previously known as the Beekman Tower and New York by Gehry,[4] is a 76-story skyscraper designed by architect Frank Gehry on Spruce Street in the Financial District of Manhattan, New York City.

8 Spruce Street is one of the tallest residential towers in the world, and it was the tallest residential tower in the Western Hemisphere at the time of opening in February 2011.[5] The building was developed by Forest City Ratner and designed by Frank Gehry Architects. WSP Cantor Seinuk was the lead structural engineer, Jaros, Baum & Bolles provided MEP engineering, and Kreisler Borg Florman was construction manager.[6][7] It contains a public elementary school owned by the Department of Education.[8] Above that and grade-level retail, the tower contains only residential rental units. The skyscraper's structural frame is made of reinforced concrete, and form-wise it falls within the architectural style of Deconstructivism.

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Frank Gehry

Frank Gehry

Frank Owen Gehry,, FAIA is a Canadian-born American architect and designer. A number of his buildings, including his private residence in Santa Monica, California, have become world-renowned attractions.

Spruce Street

Spruce Street

Spruce Street is a three-block-long street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. It starts at Park Row, near the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge, and runs east to Gold Street, intersecting with Nassau Street.

Financial District, Manhattan

Financial District, Manhattan

The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, also known as FiDi, is a neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan in New York City. It is bounded by the West Side Highway on the west, Chambers Street and City Hall Park on the north, Brooklyn Bridge on the northeast, the East River to the southeast, and South Ferry and the Battery on the south.

Manhattan

Manhattan

Manhattan is the most densely populated and geographically smallest of the five boroughs of New York City. The borough is also coextensive with New York County, one of the original counties of the U.S. state of New York. Located near the southern tip of New York State, Manhattan is based in the Eastern Time Zone and constitutes both the geographical and demographic center of the Northeast megalopolis and the urban core of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass. Over 58 million people live within 250 miles of Manhattan, which serves as New York City’s economic and administrative center, cultural identifier, and the city’s historical birthplace. Residents of the outer boroughs of New York City often refer to Manhattan as "the city". Manhattan has been described as the cultural, financial, media, and entertainment capital of the world, is considered a safe haven for global real estate investors, and hosts the United Nations headquarters. Manhattan also serves as the headquarters of the global art market.

New York City

New York City

New York, often called New York City or NYC, is the most populous city in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distributed over 300.46 square miles (778.2 km2), New York City is also the most densely populated major city in the United States, and is more than twice as populous as second-place Los Angeles. New York City lies at the southern tip of New York State, and constitutes the geographical and demographic center of both the Northeast megalopolis and the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the United States both by population and by urban landmass. With over 20.1 million people in its metropolitan statistical area and 23.5 million in its combined statistical area as of 2020, New York is one of the world's most populous megacities, and over 58 million people live within 250 mi (400 km) of the city. New York City is a global cultural, financial, entertainment, and media center with a significant influence on commerce, health care and life sciences, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, dining, art, fashion, and sports. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy, and is sometimes described as the capital of the world.

Western Hemisphere

Western Hemisphere

The Western Hemisphere is the half of the planet Earth that lies west of the Prime Meridian and east of the 180th meridian. The other half is called the Eastern Hemisphere. Politically, the term Western Hemisphere is often used as a metonymy for the Americas, even though geographically the hemisphere also includes parts of other continents.

Jaros, Baum & Bolles

Jaros, Baum & Bolles

Jaros, Baum & Bolles (JB&B) is an American MEP and consulting engineering firm founded in 1915 by Alfred L. Jaros, Jr. and Albert L. Baum. The firm is best known for high-rise projects, including One World Trade Center and Hudson Yards in New York City, the Willis Tower in Chicago, and the Bank of China Tower in Hong Kong. In 2020, JB&B was named New York’s Design Firm of the Year by Engineering-News Record magazine.

Architectural style

Architectural style

An architectural style is a set of characteristics and features that make a building or other structure notable or historically identifiable. It is a sub-class of style in the visual arts generally, and most styles in architecture relate closely to a wider contemporary artistic style. A style may include such elements as form, method of construction, building materials, and regional character. Most architecture can be classified within a chronology of styles which changes over time, reflecting changing fashions, beliefs and religions, or the emergence of new ideas, technology, or materials which make new styles possible.

Deconstructivism

Deconstructivism

Deconstructivism is a movement of postmodern architecture which appeared in the 1980s. It gives the impression of the fragmentation of the constructed building, commonly characterised by an absence of obvious harmony, continuity, or symmetry. Its name is a portmanteau of Constructivism and "Deconstruction", a form of semiotic analysis developed by the French philosopher Jacques Derrida. Architects whose work is often described as deconstructivist include Zaha Hadid, Peter Eisenman, Frank Gehry, Rem Koolhaas, Daniel Libeskind, Bernard Tschumi, and Coop Himmelb(l)au.

Site

8 Spruce Street is located on the south side of Spruce Street, between William and Nassau Streets, in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan. It is just east of City Hall Park and south of Pace University and the Brooklyn Bridge. Immediately to the west are 150 Nassau Street and the Morse Building (140 Nassau Street).[9] Prior to 8 Spruce Street's construction, the lot was used as parking for the NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital immediately to the east.[10]

As seen from Gold Street
As seen from Gold Street

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Spruce Street

Spruce Street

Spruce Street is a three-block-long street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. It starts at Park Row, near the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge, and runs east to Gold Street, intersecting with Nassau Street.

William Street (Manhattan)

William Street (Manhattan)

William Street is a street in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan, New York City. It runs generally southwest to northeast, crossing Wall Street and terminating at Broad Street and Spruce Street, respectively. Between Beaver Street and Broad Street, the street is known as South William Street. Between Beekman Street and Spruce Street, in front of New York Downtown Hospital, William Street is a pedestrian-only street.

Nassau Street (Manhattan)

Nassau Street (Manhattan)

Nassau Street is in the Financial District, within the borough of Manhattan in New York City. Its southern end is at the intersection with Broad Street and Wall Street, and its northern end is at Spruce Street, at Pace University near the foot of the Brooklyn Bridge. For its entire route, Nassau Street runs one block east of Broadway and Park Row.

Financial District, Manhattan

Financial District, Manhattan

The Financial District of Lower Manhattan, also known as FiDi, is a neighborhood located on the southern tip of Manhattan in New York City. It is bounded by the West Side Highway on the west, Chambers Street and City Hall Park on the north, Brooklyn Bridge on the northeast, the East River to the southeast, and South Ferry and the Battery on the south.

Lower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan

Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown Manhattan or Downtown New York, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in New York City, which is the most populated city in the United States with over 8.8 million residents as of the 2020 census.

City Hall Park

City Hall Park

City Hall Park is a public park surrounding New York City Hall in the Civic Center of Manhattan. It was the town commons of the nascent city of New York.

Pace University

Pace University

Pace University is a private university with its main campus in New York City and secondary campuses in Westchester County, New York. It was established in 1906 by the brothers Homer St. Clair Pace and Charles A. Pace as a business school. Pace enrolls about 13,000 students in bachelor's, master's and doctoral programs.

Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge is a hybrid cable-stayed/suspension bridge in New York City, spanning the East River between the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn. Opened on May 24, 1883, the Brooklyn Bridge was the first fixed crossing of the East River. It was also the longest suspension bridge in the world at the time of its opening, with a main span of 1,595.5 feet (486.3 m) and a deck 127 ft (38.7 m) above mean high water. The span was originally called the New York and Brooklyn Bridge or the East River Bridge but was officially renamed the Brooklyn Bridge in 1915.

150 Nassau Street

150 Nassau Street

150 Nassau Street, also known as the Park Place Tower and the American Tract Society Building, is a 23-story, 291-foot (89 m) building in the Financial District of Lower Manhattan in New York City. It is located at the southeast corner of Spruce Street and Nassau Street, next to 8 Spruce Street, the former New York Times Building, and New York City Hall.

Morse Building

Morse Building

The Morse Building, also known as the Nassau–Beekman Building and 140 Nassau Street, is a residential building in the Financial District of Manhattan in New York City, at the northeast corner of Nassau and Beekman Streets. The Morse Building, designed by Benjamin Silliman Jr. and James M. Farnsworth, contains elements of the Victorian Gothic, Neo-Grec, and Rundbogenstil style.

NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital

NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital

NewYork-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital is a nonprofit, acute care, teaching hospital in New York City and is the only hospital in Lower Manhattan south of Greenwich Village. It is part of the NewYork-Presbyterian Healthcare System and one of the main campuses of NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

Design and usage

School

The school is sheathed in reddish-tan brick, and covers 100,000 square feet (9,300 m2) of the first five floors of the building.[8] It hosts over 600 students enrolled in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade classes. A fourth floor roof deck holds 5,000 square feet (460 m2) of outdoor play space.[5][11]

Apartments

Above the elementary school is a 904-unit[12] luxury residential tower clad in stainless steel. The apartments range from 500 square feet (46 m2) to 1,600 square feet (150 m2), and consist of studios, one-, two- and three-bedroom units. All units are priced at market-rate, with no low or moderate income-restricted apartments.[13] All units are rental-only; none are available for purchase.[5]

Hospital

The building originally included space for New York Downtown Hospital next door.[5] The hospital was allocated 25,000 square feet (2,300 m2), of parking below ground. It was never used. As of 2016, it is a commercially-operated valet parking garage.

Public space

There are public plazas on both the east and west sides of the building, one 11,000 square feet (1,000 m2) and the other somewhat smaller.[11][14]

Street-level retail, totaling approximately 1,300 to 2,500 square feet (120 to 230 m2), is included as part of the project.[11]

History

Detail of the building as seen from ground level
Detail of the building as seen from ground level

8 Spruce Street opened in February 2011.[15]

During the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City in 2020, about one of every five units were vacant.[16][17] The building's owners, Brookfield Property Partners and Nuveen, placed the building for sale in November 2021 with an asking price of $850 million.[18] Bloomberg reported in late 2021 that Blackstone Inc. would likely purchase the property for $930 million, and multiple sources have confirmed the sale.[19] [20][21] Blackstone established 8 Spruce (NY) Owner LLC in December 2021 to serve as owner.[22]

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COVID-19 pandemic in New York City

COVID-19 pandemic in New York City

The first case of the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City was confirmed on March 1, 2020, though later research showed that the novel coronavirus had been circulating in New York City since January, with cases of community transmission confirmed as early as February. By March 29, over 30,000 cases were confirmed, and New York City had become the worst-affected area in the United States. There were over 2,000 deaths by April 6; at that stage, the city had more confirmed coronavirus cases than China, the UK, or Iran. Bodies of the deceased were picked up from their homes by the US Army, National Guard, and Air National Guard.

Brookfield Property Partners

Brookfield Property Partners

Brookfield Property Partners L.P. is a global commercial real estate firm that is a publicly traded limited partnership and a subsidiary of Brookfield Asset Management, an alternative asset management company. Its portfolio includes properties in the office, multi-family residential, retail, hospitality, and logistics industries throughout North America, Europe, and Australia. Its subsidiary Brookfield Properties is responsible for the management of these facilities.

Bloomberg News

Bloomberg News

Bloomberg News is an international news agency headquartered in New York City and a division of Bloomberg L.P. Content produced by Bloomberg News is disseminated through Bloomberg Terminals, Bloomberg Television, Bloomberg Radio, Bloomberg Businessweek, Bloomberg Markets, Bloomberg.com, and Bloomberg's mobile platforms. Since 2015, John Micklethwait has served as editor-in-chief.

Blackstone Inc.

Blackstone Inc.

Blackstone Inc. is an American alternative investment management company based in New York City. Blackstone's private equity business has been one of the largest investors in leveraged buyouts in the last three decades, while its real estate business has actively acquired commercial real estate. Blackstone is also active in credit, infrastructure, hedge fund solutions, insurance solutions, secondaries and growth equity. As of Q3 2022, the company's total assets under management were approximately US$951 billion, making it the largest alternative investment firm globally.

Critical reception

Early reviews of 8 Spruce Street were favorable. In The New York Times, architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff praised the building's design as a welcome addition to the skyline of New York, calling it: "the finest skyscraper to rise in New York since Eero Saarinen's CBS Building went up 46 years ago".[23] New Yorker magazine's Paul Goldberger described it as "one of the most beautiful towers downtown". Comparing Gehry's tower to the nearby Woolworth Building, completed in 1913, Goldberger said, "It is the first thing built downtown since then that actually deserves to stand beside it."[24]

CityRealty architecture critic Carter Horsely hailed the project, saying "the building would have been an unquestioned architectural masterpiece if the south façade had continued the crinkling and if the base had continued the stainless-steel cladding. Even so, it is as majestic as its cross-town rival, the great neo-Gothic Woolworth Building designed by Cass Gilbert at 233 Broadway on the other side of City Hall Park."[25] Gehry designed both the exterior, interiors and amenities spaces, along with all 20 model apartments.

The building received the Emporis Skyscraper Award for 2011.[26]

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The New York Times

The New York Times

The New York Times is a daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership reported in 2022 to comprise 740,000 paid print subscribers, and 8.6 million paid digital subscribers. It also is a producer of popular podcasts such as The Daily. Founded in 1851, it is published by The New York Times Company. The Times has won 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of any newspaper, and has long been regarded as a national "newspaper of record". For print, it is ranked 18th in the world by circulation and 3rd in the United States.

Nicolai Ouroussoff

Nicolai Ouroussoff

Nicolai Ouroussoff is a writer and educator who was an architecture critic for the Los Angeles Times and The New York Times.

Eero Saarinen

Eero Saarinen

Eero Saarinen was a Finnish-American architect and industrial designer noted for his wide-ranging array of designs for buildings and monuments. Saarinen is best known for designing the General Motors Technical Center in Michigan, Dulles International Airport outside Washington, D.C., the TWA Flight Center in New York City, and the Gateway Arch in St. Louis, Missouri. He was the son of Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen.

CBS Building

CBS Building

The CBS Building, also known as Black Rock, is the headquarters of the CBS broadcasting network at 51 West 52nd Street in the Midtown Manhattan neighborhood of New York City. The 38-story, 491-foot-tall (150 m) building, the only skyscraper designed by Eero Saarinen, was constructed from 1961 to 1964. The interior spaces and furnishings were designed by Saarinen and Florence Knoll Bassett. The building was also the headquarters of CBS Records before the early 1990s.

The New Yorker

The New Yorker

The New Yorker is an American weekly magazine featuring journalism, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. Founded as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally. It is well known for its illustrated and often topical covers, its commentaries on popular culture and eccentric American culture, its attention to modern fiction by the inclusion of short stories and literary reviews, its rigorous fact checking and copy editing, its journalism on politics and social issues, and its single-panel cartoons sprinkled throughout each issue.

Paul Goldberger

Paul Goldberger

Paul Goldberger is an American author, architecture critic and lecturer. He is known for his "Sky Line" column in The New Yorker.

Woolworth Building

Woolworth Building

The Woolworth Building is an early American skyscraper designed by architect Cass Gilbert located at 233 Broadway in the Tribeca neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City. It was the tallest building in the world from 1913 to 1930, with a height of 792 feet (241 m). More than a century after its construction, it remains one of the 100 tallest buildings in the United States.

Emporis Skyscraper Award

Emporis Skyscraper Award

The Emporis Skyscraper Award was an award for architectural excellence regarding the design of buildings and their functionality.

Source: "8 Spruce Street", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8_Spruce_Street.

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References
  1. ^ "The Beekman". Emporis. Retrieved September 21, 2011.
  2. ^ "8 Spruce Street". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved May 14, 2010.
  3. ^ "New York by Gehry at Eight Spruce Street". CTHUB. Retrieved September 21, 2011.
  4. ^ Grant, Peter (October 5, 2010). "Gehry on New Gehry Building". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  5. ^ a b c d "Gehry's Beekman Tower Gets Presented, Goes Street". Curbed.com.
  6. ^ "Eight Spruce Street - The Skyscraper Center". www.skyscrapercenter.com. Retrieved January 25, 2023.
  7. ^ "8 Spruce Street -". World-Architects. Retrieved January 25, 2023.
  8. ^ a b Ouroussoff, Nicolai (May 31, 2008). "Looking Skyward in Lower Manhattan". The New York Times. Retrieved May 25, 2010.
  9. ^ "NYCityMap". NYC.gov. New York City Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
  10. ^ Stamler, Bernard (March 14, 1999). "Neighborhood Report: Lower Manhattan; N.Y.U. Hospital Plans a High-Rise, to Neighbors' Dismay". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved July 11, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c "Gehry's Beekman Tower Ready to Launch". LowerManhattan.info. Archived from the original on April 28, 2009. Retrieved September 11, 2008.
  12. ^ "8 Spruce Street, Manhattan on the NYC Oasis Map
  13. ^ "Unveiled: Beekman Tower". The Architects Newspaper.
  14. ^ "Seaport's early reviews are bad for Gehry's tower". Downtown Express. Archived from the original on February 18, 2009. Retrieved January 1, 2009.
  15. ^ Ouroussoff, Nicolai. "Downtown Skyscraper for the Digital Age". nytimes.com. Retrieved July 5, 2022.
  16. ^ Parker, Will; Putzier, Konrad (January 5, 2021). "Frank Gehry's Luxury New York City Skyscraper Has Everything—Except Enough Tenants". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  17. ^ "Occupancy at The New York by Gehry falls by more than 20%". The Real Deal New York. November 1, 2020. Retrieved January 6, 2021.
  18. ^ Bockmann, Rich (November 3, 2021). "Lower Manhattan's Gehry Tower For Sale at $850M". The Real Deal New York. Retrieved November 9, 2021.
  19. ^ Clark, Patrick (December 19, 2021). "Blackstone Nears $930 Million Deal for Manhattan Apartments". www.bloomberg.com. Retrieved December 20, 2021.
  20. ^ Media, PincusCo (June 20, 2022). "Blackstone pays $930M to Nuveen, Brookfield for 8 Spruce in FiDi". PincusCo. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  21. ^ "Blackstone's 8 Spruce accuses tenant of housing restaurant - NJ News Update". September 24, 2022. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  22. ^ "Sale of the Retail/Residential Condo at FiDi's 8 Spruce Street Closes – ABS Partners". absre.com. Retrieved November 19, 2022.
  23. ^ Ouroussoff, Nicolai. "Downtown Skyscraper For the Digital Age". The New York Times (February 10, 2011)
  24. ^ Goldberger, Paul. "Sky Line: Gracious Living: Frank Gehry's swirling apartment". The New Yorker (March 7, 2011)
  25. ^ "New York By Gehry: Building Review". CityRealty.
  26. ^ Greg Pitcher (December 7, 2012). "Gehry's New York tower scoops major skyscraper prize". Architects Journal. EMAP Ltd. Retrieved December 11, 2012.
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