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58th United States Congress

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58th United States Congress
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March 4, 1903 – March 4, 1905
Members90 senators
386 representatives
5 non-voting delegates
Senate majorityRepublican
Senate PresidentVacant
House majorityRepublican
House SpeakerJoseph G. Cannon (R)
Sessions
Special: March 5, 1903 – March 19, 1903
1st: November 9, 1903 – December 7, 1903
2nd: December 7, 1903 – April 28, 1904
3rd: December 5, 1904 – March 3, 1905

The 58th United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC, from March 4, 1903, to March 4, 1905, during the third and fourth years of Theodore Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the 1900 United States census. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

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United States Senate

United States Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, with the House of Representatives being the lower chamber. Together they compose the national bicameral legislature of the United States.

United States House of Representatives

United States House of Representatives

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, with the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the national bicameral legislature of the United States.

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt Jr., often referred to as Teddy or by his initials, T. R., was an American politician, statesman, soldier, conservationist, naturalist, historian, and writer who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909. He previously served as the 25th vice president under President William McKinley from March to September 1901 and as the 33rd governor of New York from 1899 to 1900. Assuming the presidency after McKinley's assassination, Roosevelt emerged as a leader of the Republican Party and became a driving force for anti-trust and Progressive policies.

Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt

Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt

The presidency of Theodore Roosevelt started on September 14, 1901, when Theodore Roosevelt became the 26th president of the United States upon the assassination of President William McKinley, and ended on March 4, 1909. Roosevelt had been the vice president for only 194 days when he succeeded to the presidency. A Republican, he ran for and won by a landslide a four-year term in 1904. He was succeeded by his protégé and chosen successor, William Howard Taft.

1900 United States census

1900 United States census

The United States census of 1900, conducted by the Census Office on June 1, 1900, determined the resident population of the United States to be 76,212,168, an increase of 21.01% from the 62,979,766 persons enumerated during the 1890 census.

Republican Party (United States)

Republican Party (United States)

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. The GOP was founded in 1854 by anti-slavery activists who opposed the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which allowed for the potential expansion of chattel slavery into the western territories. Since Ronald Reagan's presidency in the 1980s, conservatism has been the dominant ideology of the GOP. It has been the main political rival of the Democratic Party since the mid-1850s. The Republican Party's historical predecessor is considered to be Northern members of the Whig Party, with Republican presidents Abraham Lincoln, Rutherford B. Hayes, Chester A. Arthur, and Benjamin Harrison all being Whigs before switching to the party, from which they were elected. The collapse of the Whigs, which had previously been one of the two major parties in the country, strengthened the party's electoral success.

Major events

Party summary

Senate

Party
(shading shows control)
Total Vacant
Democratic
(D)
Populist
(P)
Republican
(R)
Silver
Republican

(SR)
End of previous congress 29 2 56 2 89 1
Begin 33 0 57 0 90 0
End 56 891
Final voting share 37.1% 0.0% 62.9% 0.0%
Beginning of next congress 31 0 57 0 88 2

House of Representatives

Party
(shading shows control)
Total Vacant
Democratic
(D)
Populist
(P)
Republican
(R)
Silver
Republican

(SR)
End of previous congress 148 5 197 1 351 6
Begin 178 0 206 0 384 2
End 175 209
Final voting share 45.6% 0.0% 54.4% 0.0%
Beginning of next congress 178 0 206 0 384 2

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Democratic Party (United States)

Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. Founded in 1828, it was predominantly built by Martin Van Buren, who assembled a wide cadre of politicians in every state behind war hero Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party. Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s. The party is a big tent, and is less ideologically uniform than the Republican Party due to the broader list of unique voting blocs that compose it, though modern liberalism is the majority ideology in the party.

Republican Party (United States)

Republican Party (United States)

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. The GOP was founded in 1854 by anti-slavery activists who opposed the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which allowed for the potential expansion of chattel slavery into the western territories. Since Ronald Reagan's presidency in the 1980s, conservatism has been the dominant ideology of the GOP. It has been the main political rival of the Democratic Party since the mid-1850s. The Republican Party's historical predecessor is considered to be Northern members of the Whig Party, with Republican presidents Abraham Lincoln, Rutherford B. Hayes, Chester A. Arthur, and Benjamin Harrison all being Whigs before switching to the party, from which they were elected. The collapse of the Whigs, which had previously been one of the two major parties in the country, strengthened the party's electoral success.

57th United States Congress

57th United States Congress

The 57th United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, DC from March 4, 1901, to March 4, 1903, during the final six months of William McKinley's presidency, and the first year and a half of the first administration of his successor, Theodore Roosevelt. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the 1890 United States census. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

59th United States Congress

59th United States Congress

The 59th United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1905, to March 4, 1907, during the fifth and sixth years of Theodore Roosevelt's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the 1900 United States census. Both chambers had a Republican majority.

Leadership

Senate

House of Representatives

Majority (Republican) leadership

Minority (Democratic) leadership

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President pro tempore of the United States Senate

President pro tempore of the United States Senate

The president pro tempore of the United States Senate is the second-highest-ranking official of the United States Senate, after the vice president. According to Article One, Section Three of the United States Constitution, the vice president of the United States is the president of the Senate, and the Senate must choose a president pro tempore to act in the vice president's absence.

William P. Frye

William P. Frye

William Pierce Frye was an American politician from Maine. A member of the Republican Party, Frye spent most of his political career as a legislator, serving in the Maine House of Representatives and then U.S. House of Representatives, before being elected to the U.S. Senate, where he served for 30 years before dying in office. Frye was a member of the Frye political family, and was the grandfather of Wallace H. White Jr., and the son of John March Frye. He was also a prominent member of the Peucinian Society tradition.

William B. Allison

William B. Allison

William Boyd Allison was an American politician. An early leader of the Iowa Republican Party, he represented northeastern Iowa in the United States House of Representatives before representing his state in the United States Senate. By the 1890s, Allison had become one of the "big four" key Republicans who largely controlled the Senate, along with Orville H. Platt of Connecticut, John Coit Spooner of Wisconsin and Nelson W. Aldrich of Rhode Island.

Edward W. Carmack

Edward W. Carmack

Edward Ward Carmack was an attorney, newspaperman, and political figure who served as a U.S. Senator from Tennessee from 1901 to 1907.

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives

The speaker of the United States House of Representatives, commonly known as the speaker of the House, is the presiding officer of the United States House of Representatives. The office was established in 1789 by Article I, Section 2 of the U.S. Constitution. The speaker is the political and parliamentary leader of the House and is simultaneously its presiding officer, de facto leader of the body's majority party, and the institution's administrative head. Speakers also perform various other administrative and procedural functions. Given these several roles and responsibilities, the speaker usually does not personally preside over debates—that duty is instead delegated to members of the House from the majority party—nor regularly participate in floor debates.

Sereno E. Payne

Sereno E. Payne

Sereno Elisha Payne was a United States representative from New York and the first House Majority Leader, holding the office from 1899 to 1911. He was a Republican congressman from 1883 to 1887 and then from 1889 to his death in 1914. He was chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee for 12 years starting in 1899. The Payne–Aldrich Tariff is perhaps the most significant legislation he introduced during that period. He was known as a staunch protectionist.

James Albertus Tawney

James Albertus Tawney

James Albertus Tawney was an American blacksmith, machinist and U.S. politician and a member of the United States House of Representatives from Minnesota. He was the first House Majority Whip, holding that position from 1899 to 1905.

William Peters Hepburn

William Peters Hepburn

William Peters Hepburn was an American Civil War officer and an eleven-term Republican congressman from Iowa's now-obsolete 8th congressional district, serving from 1881 to 1887, and from 1893 to 1909. According to historian Edmund Morris, "Hepburn was the House's best debater, admired for his strength of character and legal acumen." As chair of one of the most powerful committees in Congress, he guided or sponsored many statutes regulating businesses, including most notably the Hepburn Act of 1906. The Hepburn Act authorized the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission to require railroads to charge "just and reasonable" rates.

John Sharp Williams

John Sharp Williams

John Sharp Williams was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party from the 1890s through the 1920s, and served as the Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives from 1903 to 1908.

Members

This list is arranged by chamber, then by state. Senators are listed in order of seniority, and representatives are listed by district.

Skip to House of Representatives, below

Senate

At this time, senators were elected by the state legislatures every two years, with one-third beginning new six-year terms with each Congress. Preceding the names in the list below are Senate class numbers, which indicate the cycle of their election, In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, facing re-election in 1904; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, facing re-election in 1906; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, facing re-election in 1908.

House of Representatives

The names of members of the House of Representatives elected statewide on the general ticket or otherwise at-large, are preceded by an "At-large," and the names of those elected from districts, whether plural or single member, are preceded by their district numbers.

Many of the congressional district numbers are linked to articles describing the district itself. Since the boundaries of the districts have changed often and substantially, the linked article may only describe the district as it exists today, and not as it was at the time of this Congress.

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Classes of United States senators

Classes of United States senators

The 100 seats in the United States Senate are divided into three classes for the purpose of determining which seats will be up for election in any two-year cycle, with only one class being up for election at a time. With senators being elected to fixed terms of six years, the classes allow about a third of the seats to be up for election in any presidential or midterm election year instead of having all 100 be up for election at the same time every six years. The seats are also divided in such a way that any given state's two senators are in different classes so that each seat's term ends in different years. Class 1 and 2 consist of 33 seats each, while class 3 consists of 34 seats. Elections for class 1 seats took place most recently in 2018, class 2 in 2020, and the elections for class 3 seats in 2022.

List of United States senators from Alabama

List of United States senators from Alabama

Alabama was admitted to the Union on December 14, 1819. The state elects U.S. senators to Class 2 and Class 3. Its United States Senate seats were declared vacant from March 1861 to July 1868 due to its secession from the Union during the American Civil War. Richard Shelby is Alabama's longest serving senator. Alabama's current U.S. senators are Republicans Tommy Tuberville and Katie Britt.

John Tyler Morgan

John Tyler Morgan

John Tyler Morgan was an American politician was served as a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War and later was elected for six terms as the U.S. Senator (1877–1907) from the state of Alabama. A prominent slave holder before the Civil War, he purportedly became the second Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama during the Reconstruction era. Morgan and fellow Klan member Edmund W. Pettus became the ringleaders of white supremacy in Alabama and did more than anyone else in the state to overthrow Reconstruction efforts in the wake of the Civil War. When President Ulysses S. Grant dispatched U.S. Attorney General Amos Akerman to prosecute the Klan under the Enforcement Acts, Morgan was arrested and jailed.

Edmund Pettus

Edmund Pettus

Edmund Winston Pettus was a lawyer and politician who represented Alabama in the United States Senate from 1897 to 1907. He served as a senior officer of the Confederate States Army, commanding infantry in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. After the war, he was politically active in the Ku Klux Klan, serving as a Grand Dragon.

List of United States senators from Arkansas

List of United States senators from Arkansas

Arkansas was admitted to the Union on June 15, 1836, and elects its senators to Class 2 and Class 3. Arkansas's Senate seats were declared vacant in July 1861, due to its secession from the Union. They were again filled from June 1868. Its current senators are Republicans John Boozman and Tom Cotton. John L. McClellan was Arkansas's longest-serving senator (1943–1977).

James Henderson Berry

James Henderson Berry

James Henderson Berry was a United States Senator and served as the 14th governor of Arkansas.

James Paul Clarke

James Paul Clarke

James Paul Clarke was a United States Senator and the 18th Governor of Arkansas as well as a white supremacist.

List of United States senators from California

List of United States senators from California

California elects United States senators to Class 1 and Class 3. The state has been represented by 47 people in the Senate since it was admitted to the Union on September 9, 1850. Its U.S. senators are Democrats Dianne Feinstein and Alex Padilla. Feinstein is the longest serving Senator from California.

George Clement Perkins

George Clement Perkins

George Clement Perkins was an American businessman and politician. A member of the Republican Party, Perkins served as the 14th Governor of California from 1880 to 1883, and as United States Senator from California from 1893 to 1915. He also served in the California State Senate.

List of United States senators from Colorado

List of United States senators from Colorado

Colorado was admitted to the Union on August 1, 1876 and elects U.S. senators to Senate Class 2 and Class 3. Its current U.S. senators are Democrats Michael Bennet and John Hickenlooper. Henry M. Teller was Colorado's longest-serving senator.

List of United States senators from Connecticut

List of United States senators from Connecticut

This is a chronological listing of the United States senators from Connecticut.

Joseph Roswell Hawley

Joseph Roswell Hawley

Joseph Roswell Hawley was the 42nd Governor of Connecticut, a U.S. politician in the Republican and Free Soil parties, a Civil War general, and a journalist and newspaper editor. He served two terms in the United States House of Representatives and was a four-term U.S. Senator.

Changes in membership

The count below reflects changes from the beginning of the first session of this Congress.

Senate

  • Replacements: 3
  • Deaths: 3
  • Resignations: 1
  • Vacancy: 0
  • Total seats with changes: 4
State
(class)
Vacated by Reason for vacancy Subsequent Date of successor's installation
Ohio
(1)
Mark Hanna (R) Died February 15, 1904. Successor was elected. Charles W. F. Dick (R) March 2, 1904
Pennsylvania
(1)
Matthew Quay (R) Died May 28, 1904. Successor was appointed and subsequently elected. Philander C. Knox (R) June 10, 1904
Massachusetts
(2)
George Frisbie Hoar (R) Died September 30, 1904. Successor was appointed and subsequently elected. Winthrop M. Crane (R) October 12, 1904
Indiana
(3)
Charles W. Fairbanks (R) Resigned March 3, 1905, after being elected Vice-president of the United States Vacant until next Congress

House of Representatives

  • Replacements: 14
  • Deaths: 8
  • Resignations: 7
  • Contested elections: 1
  • Total seats with changes: 18
District Previous Reason for change Subsequent Date of successor's installation
Kansas 7th Vacant Rep. Chester I. Long resigned during previous congress Victor Murdock (R) May 26, 1903
Oregon 1st Vacant Rep. Thomas H. Tongue died during previous congress Binger Hermann (R) June 1, 1903
Pennsylvania 4th Robert H. Foerderer (R) Died July 26, 1903 Reuben Moon (R) November 3, 1903
Kentucky 11th Vincent Boreing (R) Died September 16, 1903 W. Godfrey Hunter (R) November 10, 1903
Ohio 16th Joseph J. Gill (R) Resigned October 31, 1903 Capell L. Weems (R) November 3, 1903
Texas 8th Thomas Henry Ball (D) Resigned November 16, 1903 John M. Pinckney (D) November 17, 1903
Pennsylvania 3rd Henry Burk (R) Died December 5, 1903 George A. Castor (R) February 16, 1904
New York 12th George B. McClellan Jr. (D) Resigned December 21, 1903, after being elected Mayor of New York William B. Cockran (D) February 23, 1904
Ohio 14th William W. Skiles (R) Died January 9, 1904 Amos R. Webber (R) November 8, 1904
Pennsylvania 10th George Howell (D) Lost contested election February 10, 1904 William Connell (R) February 10, 1904
Colorado 1st John F. Shafroth (D) Resigned February 15, 1904, after believing he was elected due to election irregularities Robert W. Bonynge (R) February 16, 1904
South Carolina 2nd George W. Croft (D) Died March 10, 1904 Theodore G. Croft (D) May 17, 1904
Ohio 19th Charles W. F. Dick (R) Resigned March 23, 1904, after being elected to the U.S. Senate W. Aubrey Thomas (R) November 8, 1904
Alabama 5th Charles W. Thompson (D) Died March 20, 1904 J. Thomas Heflin (D) May 19, 1904
New Jersey 4th William M. Lanning (R) Resigned June 6, 1904, after being appointed judge for the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey Ira W. Wood (R) November 8, 1904
California 3rd Victor H. Metcalf (R) Resigned July 1, 1904, after being appointed United States Department of Commerce and Labor Joseph R. Knowland (R) November 8, 1904
Illinois 8th William F. Mahoney (D) Died December 27, 1904 Seat remained vacant until next Congress
New York 19th Norton P. Otis (R) Died February 20, 1905 Seat remained vacant until next Congress

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Democratic Party (United States)

Democratic Party (United States)

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States. Founded in 1828, it was predominantly built by Martin Van Buren, who assembled a wide cadre of politicians in every state behind war hero Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party. Its main political rival has been the Republican Party since the 1850s. The party is a big tent, and is less ideologically uniform than the Republican Party due to the broader list of unique voting blocs that compose it, though modern liberalism is the majority ideology in the party.

List of United States senators from Ohio

List of United States senators from Ohio

Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803, and elects U.S. senators to Class 1 and Class 3. Its current U.S. senators are Democrat Sherrod Brown and Republican J. D. Vance, making it one of seven states to have a split United States Senate delegation; these states being Maine, Montana, Ohio itself, Pennsylvania, Vermont, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. Not counting Vermont, where Independents have caucused with the Democrats since 2001, Ohio has had the longest current split delegation, having had two senators from the opposite parties since 2007. John Sherman was Ohio's longest-serving senator.

Mark Hanna

Mark Hanna

Marcus Alonzo Hanna was an American businessman and Republican politician who served as a United States Senator from Ohio as well as chairman of the Republican National Committee. A friend and political ally of President William McKinley, Hanna used his wealth and business skills to successfully manage McKinley's presidential campaigns in 1896 and in 1900.

Charles W. F. Dick

Charles W. F. Dick

Charles William Frederick Dick was a Republican politician from Ohio. He served in the United States House of Representatives and U.S. Senate.

List of United States senators from Pennsylvania

List of United States senators from Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania ratified the United States Constitution on December 12, 1787, and elects its U.S. senators to Class 1 and Class 3. Officeholders are popularly elected, for a six-year term, beginning January 3. Elections are held the first Tuesday after November 1. Before 1914, they were chosen by the Pennsylvania General Assembly; before 1935, their terms began March 4. The state's current U.S. senators are Democrats Bob Casey Jr. and John Fetterman. Arlen Specter was Pennsylvania's longest-serving senator (1981–2011).

Matthew Quay

Matthew Quay

Matthew Stanley Quay was an American politician of the Republican Party who represented Pennsylvania in the United States Senate from 1887 until 1899 and from 1901 until his death in 1904. Quay's control of the Pennsylvania Republican political machine made him one of the most powerful and influential politicians in the country, and he ruled Pennsylvania politics for almost twenty years. As chair of the Republican National Committee and thus party campaign manager, he helped elect Benjamin Harrison as president in 1888 despite his not winning the popular vote. He was also instrumental in the 1900 election of Theodore Roosevelt as vice president.

List of United States senators from Massachusetts

List of United States senators from Massachusetts

Below is a chronological listing of the United States senators from Massachusetts. According to the Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution adopted in 1913, U.S. senators are popularly elected for a six-year term. Elections are held the first Tuesday after November 1, and terms begin on January 3, about two months after the vote. Before 1914, and the enforcement of the Seventeenth Amendment, the state's U.S. senators were chosen by the Massachusetts General Court, and before 1935, their terms began March 4.

George Frisbie Hoar

George Frisbie Hoar

George Frisbie Hoar was an American attorney and politician who represented Massachusetts in the United States Senate from 1877 to 1904. He belonged to an extended family that became politically prominent in 18th- and 19th-century New England.

List of United States senators from Indiana

List of United States senators from Indiana

Indiana was admitted to the Union on December 11, 1816. Since then, the state has been represented in the United States Senate by 44 different men in Class 1 and 3; David Turpie served non-consecutive terms in Class 1, Dan Coats served non-consecutive terms in Class 3, and William E. Jenner served in both Classes. Until the passage of the Seventeenth Amendment to the United States Constitution in 1913, Senators were elected by the Indiana General Assembly; after that, they were elected popularly by Indiana citizens. A senatorial term lasts six years beginning on January 3. In case of a vacancy, the Governor of Indiana has the duty to appoint a new U.S. senator. Indiana's current U.S. senators are Republicans Todd Young and Mike Braun.

Charles W. Fairbanks

Charles W. Fairbanks

Charles Warren Fairbanks was an American politician who served as a senator from Indiana from 1897 to 1905 and the 26th vice president of the United States from 1905 to 1909. He was also the Republican vice presidential nominee in the 1916 presidential election. Had the Republican ticket been elected, Fairbanks would have become the third vice president to multiple presidents, after George Clinton and John C. Calhoun.

Kansas's 7th congressional district

Kansas's 7th congressional district

Kansas's 7th congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in the state of Kansas is a defunct congressional district.

Chester I. Long

Chester I. Long

Chester Isaiah Long was a United States representative and Senator from Kansas. Born in Greenwood Township, Pennsylvania, he moved with his parents to Daviess County, Missouri, in 1865 and to Paola, Kansas, in 1879. He attended the country schools and graduated from the normal school at Paola in 1880. He taught school for several years, studied law, and was admitted to the bar in 1885, commencing practice in Medicine Lodge, Kansas.

Committees

Lists of committees and their party leaders for members of the House and Senate committees can be found through the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of this article. The directory after the pages of terms of service lists committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and, after that, House/Senate committee assignments. On the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

Senate

House of Representatives

Joint committees

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Redfield Proctor

Redfield Proctor

Redfield Proctor was a U.S. politician of the Republican Party. He served as the 37th governor of Vermont from 1878 to 1880, as Secretary of War from 1889 to 1891, and as a United States Senator for Vermont from 1891 to 1908.

William B. Bate

William B. Bate

William Brimage Bate was a planter and slaveholder, Confederate officer, and politician in Tennessee. After the Reconstruction era, he served as the 23rd governor of Tennessee from 1883 to 1887. He was elected to the United States Senate from Tennessee, serving from 1887 until his death.

United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

The United States Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. It has jurisdiction over all discretionary spending legislation in the Senate.

William B. Allison

William B. Allison

William Boyd Allison was an American politician. An early leader of the Iowa Republican Party, he represented northeastern Iowa in the United States House of Representatives before representing his state in the United States Senate. By the 1890s, Allison had become one of the "big four" key Republicans who largely controlled the Senate, along with Orville H. Platt of Connecticut, John Coit Spooner of Wisconsin and Nelson W. Aldrich of Rhode Island.

United States Senate Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate

United States Senate Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the Senate

This committee of the United States Senate was created November 4, 1807. On January 2, 1947 its functions were transferred to the Committee on Rules and Administration.

John Kean (New Jersey politician)

John Kean (New Jersey politician)

John Kean was an American attorney, banker and Republican Party politician from Elizabeth, New Jersey. He represented New Jersey in the U.S. Senate from 1899 to 1911 and served two separate terms in the United States House of Representatives, from 1883 to 1885, and from 1887 to 1889. A member of the Kean family of politicians, his great-grandfather, John Kean, had been a delegate to the Continental Congress for South Carolina, his brother was U.S. Senator Hamilton Fish Kean, his nephew was U.S. Representative Robert Kean and his great-nephew was Governor Thomas Kean.

United States Senate Committee on Canadian Relations

United States Senate Committee on Canadian Relations

The United States Senate Committee on Canadian Relations existed from July 31, 1888, when it was created as a select committee, until April 18, 1921, and dealt with issues related to U.S. relations with Canada. It became a standing committee on January 13, 1892.

United States Senate Committee on the Census

United States Senate Committee on the Census

The United States Senate Select Committee on the Tenth Census was created in 1878. It continued to operate until 1887, when it became the United States Senate Committee on the Census. The Committee was abolished in 1921. Issues related to the U.S. Census and the U.S. Census Bureau are now under the jurisdiction of the United States Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

Joseph V. Quarles

Joseph V. Quarles

Joseph Very Quarles, Jr., was an American lawyer, politician, and Wisconsin pioneer. He served as a United States senator from Wisconsin and a United States district judge for the Eastern District of Wisconsin. Earlier in his career, he was the 20th mayor of Kenosha, Wisconsin, and served as an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Samuel D. McEnery

Samuel D. McEnery

Samuel Douglas McEnery served as the 30th Governor of the U.S. state of Louisiana, with service from 1881 until 1888. He was subsequently a U.S. senator from 1897 until 1910. He was the brother of John McEnery, one of the candidates in the contested 1872 election for governor.

United States Senate Committee on Civil Service

United States Senate Committee on Civil Service

United States Senate Committee on Civil Service is a defunct committee of the United States Senate.

Caucuses

Employees

Legislative branch agency directors

Senate

House of Representatives

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Architect of the Capitol

Architect of the Capitol

The Architect of the Capitol (AOC) is the federal agency responsible for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex. It is an agency of the legislative branch of the federal government and is accountable to the United States Congress and the Supreme Court. The head of the agency is also called "Architect of the Capitol".

Elliott Woods

Elliott Woods

Elliott Woods was an American architect who served as Architect of the Capitol from 1902 to 1923.

Librarian of Congress

Librarian of Congress

The Librarian of Congress is the head of the Library of Congress, appointed by the president of the United States with the advice and consent of the United States Senate, for a term of ten years. In addition to overseeing the library, the Librarian of Congress appoints the U.S. poet laureate and awards the Gershwin Prize for Popular Song.

Herbert Putnam

Herbert Putnam

George Herbert Putnam was an American librarian. He was the eighth Librarian of Congress from 1899 to 1939. He implemented his vision of a universal collection with strengths in many languages, especially from Europe and Latin America.

Public Printer of the United States

Public Printer of the United States

The Public Printer of the United States was the head of the United States Government Publishing Office (GPO). Pursuant to 44 U.S.C. § 301, this officer was nominated by the President of the United States and approved by the United States Senate. In December 2014, Congress passed and President Obama signed into law H.R. 83, which consolidated and continued appropriations for FY 2015. Section 1301 of that act changed the name of the Government Printing Office to the Government Publishing Office and the title of Public Printer to Director. Thus, Davita Vance-Cooks was the last Public Printer of the United States and the first Director of the U.S. Government Publishing Office.

Francis W. Palmer

Francis W. Palmer

Francis Wayland Palmer was an American politician, publisher, printer, editor and proprietor from New York, Iowa and Illinois.

Secretary of the United States Senate

Secretary of the United States Senate

The secretary of the Senate is an officer of the United States Senate. The secretary supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. The office is somewhat analogous to that of the clerk of the United States House of Representatives.

Charles G. Bennett

Charles G. Bennett

Charles Goodwin Bennett was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from New York.

Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate

Sergeant at Arms of the United States Senate

The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the United States Senate is the protocol officer, executive officer, and highest-ranking federal law enforcement officer of the Senate of the United States. The office of the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate currently has just short of 1,000 full time staff.

Chaplain of the United States Senate

Chaplain of the United States Senate

The chaplain of the United States Senate opens each session of the United States Senate with a prayer, and provides and coordinates religious programs and pastoral care support for senators, their staffs, and their families. The chaplain is appointed by a majority vote of the members of the Senate on a resolution nominating an individual for the position. The three most recent nominations have been submitted based on a bipartisan search committee although that procedure is not required.

Clerk of the United States House of Representatives

Clerk of the United States House of Representatives

The Clerk of the United States House of Representatives is an officer of the United States House of Representatives, whose primary duty is to act as the chief record-keeper for the House.

Alexander McDowell

Alexander McDowell

Alexander McDowell was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania.

Source: "58th United States Congress", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 26th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/58th_United_States_Congress.

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