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2024 Summer Olympics

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Games of the XXXIII Olympiad
2024 Summer Olympics logo.svg
Emblem of the 2024 Summer Olympics
Host cityParis, France
MottoGames wide open
(French: Ouvrons grand les Jeux)[1]
NationsTBA
Athletes10,500 (quota limit)[2]
Events329 in 32 sports (48 disciplines)
Opening26 July 2024
Closing11 August 2024
StadiumStade de France (Athletics competition, closing ceremony)[3]
Jardins du Trocadéro and River Seine (Opening ceremony)
Summer
Winter
2024 Summer Paralympics

The 2024 Summer Olympics (French: Jeux olympiques d'été de 2024), officially the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad (French: Jeux de la XXXIIIe Olympiade) and also known as Paris 2024, is an upcoming international multi-sport event that is scheduled to take place from 26 July to 11 August 2024 with Paris as its main host city and 16 cities spread across Metropolitan France and one in Tahiti—an island within the French overseas country and overseas collectivity of French Polynesia—as a subsite.[4]

Paris was awarded the Games at the 131st IOC Session in Lima, Peru, on 13 September 2017. Due to multiple withdrawals that left only Paris and Los Angeles in contention, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) approved a process to concurrently award the 2024 and 2028 Summer Olympics to the two cities. Having previously hosted in 1900 and 1924, Paris will become the second city to host the Summer Olympics three times after London (1908, 1948 and 2012). The Paris Games of 2024 will mark the centenary of the Paris Games of 1924, the sixth Olympic games hosted by France (three in summer - 1900, 1924, 2024 and three in winter - 1924, 1968, 1992), and the first Olympic Games in France since the 1992 Winter Olympics in Albertville. The event will return to its traditional 4-year Olympiad cycle, after the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japan was delayed to 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Games will feature the debut of breaking (breakdancing) as an Olympic event, and it will also be the final Olympic Games held during the presidency of IOC President Thomas Bach.[5]

The games are expected to cost $8.5 Billion.[6]

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131st IOC Session

131st IOC Session

The 131st IOC Session took place between September 13 – September 16, 2017 at the Lima Convention Centre in Lima, Peru. The host cities for the 2024 Summer Olympics and the 2028 Summer Olympics were elected during the 131st IOC Session on September 13, 2017.

2028 Summer Olympics

2028 Summer Olympics

The 2028 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XXXIV Olympiad, and commonly known as Los Angeles 2028 or LA28 is an upcoming international multi-sport event scheduled to take place from July 14 to July 30, 2028 in and around Los Angeles, California, United States.

1900 Summer Olympics

1900 Summer Olympics

The 1900 Summer Olympics, today officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad and also known as Paris 1900, were an international multi-sport event that took place in Paris, France, from 14 May to 28 October 1900. No opening or closing ceremonies were held.

1924 Summer Olympics

1924 Summer Olympics

The 1924 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the VIII Olympiad and also known as Paris 1924, were an international multi-sport event held in Paris, France. The opening ceremony was held on 5 July, but some competitions had already started on 4 May. The Games were the second to be hosted by Paris, making it the first city to host the Olympics twice.

1908 Summer Olympics

1908 Summer Olympics

The 1908 Summer Olympics were an international multi-sport event held in London, England, United Kingdom, from 27 April to 31 October 1908. The 1908 Games were originally scheduled to be held in Rome, but were relocated on financial grounds following the violent eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 1906, which claimed over 100 lives; Rome eventually hosted the Games in 1960.

1948 Summer Olympics

1948 Summer Olympics

The 1948 Summer Olympics were an international multi-sport event held from 29 July to 14 August 1948 in London, England, United Kingdom. Following a twelve-year hiatus caused by the outbreak of World War II, these were the first Summer Olympics held since the 1936 Games in Berlin. The 1940 Olympic Games had been scheduled for Tokyo and then for Helsinki, while the 1944 Olympic Games had been provisionally planned for London. This was the second time London had hosted the Olympic Games, having previously hosted them in 1908, forty years earlier. The Olympics would again return to London 64 years later in 2012, making London the first city to have hosted the games three times, and the only such city until Paris and Los Angeles host their third games in 2024 and 2028, respectively. The 1948 Olympic Games were also the first of two summer Games held under the IOC presidency of Sigfrid Edström.

2012 Summer Olympics

2012 Summer Olympics

The 2012 Summer Olympics was an international multi-sport event held from 27 July to 12 August 2012 in London, England, United Kingdom. The first event, the group stage in women's football, began on 25 July at the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, Wales, followed by the opening ceremony on 27 July. There were 10,768 athletes from 204 National Olympic Committees (NOCs) who participated in the 2012 Olympics.

1924 Winter Olympics

1924 Winter Olympics

The 1924 Winter Olympics, officially known as the I Olympic Winter Games and commonly known as Chamonix 1924, were a winter multi-sport event which was held in 1924 in Chamonix, France. Originally held in association with the 1924 Summer Olympics, the sports competitions were held at the foot of Mont Blanc in Chamonix, and Haute-Savoie, France between 25 January and 5 February 1924. The Games were organized by the French Olympic Committee, and were originally reckoned as the "International Winter Sports Week." With the success of the event, it was retroactively designated by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) as "the first Olympic Winter Games".

1968 Winter Olympics

1968 Winter Olympics

The 1968 Winter Olympics, officially known as the X Olympic Winter Games, were a winter multi-sport event held from 6 to 18 February 1968 in Grenoble, France. Thirty-seven countries participated. Frenchman Jean-Claude Killy won three gold medals in all the alpine skiing events. In women's figure skating, Peggy Fleming won the only United States gold medal. The games have been credited with making the Winter Olympics more popular in the United States, not least of which because of ABC's extensive coverage of Fleming and Killy, who became overnight sensations among teenage girls.

1992 Winter Olympics

1992 Winter Olympics

The 1992 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XVI Olympic Winter Games and commonly known as Albertville '92, was a winter multi-sport event held from 8 to 23 February 1992 in and around Albertville, France. Albertville won the bid to host the Winter Olympics in 1986, beating Sofia, Falun, Lillehammer, Cortina d'Ampezzo, Anchorage, and Berchtesgaden. The 1992 Winter Olympics were the last winter games held in the same year as the Summer Olympics. The Games were the fifth Olympic Games held in France and the country's third Winter Olympics, after the 1924 Winter Games in Chamonix and the 1968 Winter Games in Grenoble. This games was the first of two consecutive Olympic games to be held in Western Europe, preceding the 1992 Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain.

Albertville

Albertville

Albertville is a subprefecture of the Savoie department in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in Southeastern France. It is best known for hosting the 1992 Winter Olympics and Paralympics. In 2018, the commune had a population of 19,214; its urban area had 39,780 inhabitants.

2020 Summer Olympics

2020 Summer Olympics

The 2020 Summer Olympics , officially the Games of the XXXII Olympiad and also known as Tokyo 2020 , was an international multi-sport event held from 23 July to 8 August 2021 in Tokyo, Japan, with some preliminary events that began on 21 July 2021. Tokyo was selected as the host city during the 125th IOC Session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 7 September 2013.

Bidding process

Paris, Hamburg, Budapest, Rome, and Los Angeles were the five candidate cities. The process was slowed by withdrawals, political uncertainty, and deterring costs.[7] Hamburg withdrew its bid on 29 November 2015 after holding a referendum.[8] Rome withdrew on 21 September 2016 citing fiscal difficulties.[9] On 22 February 2017, Budapest withdrew after a petition against the bid collected more signatures than necessary for a referendum.[10][11][12]

Following these withdrawals, the IOC Executive Board met in Lausanne, Switzerland, to discuss the 2024 and 2028 bid processes on 9 June 2017.[13][14] The International Olympic Committee formally proposed electing the 2024 and 2028 Olympic host cities at the same time in 2017, a proposal which an Extraordinary IOC Session approved on 11 July 2017 in Lausanne.[14] The IOC set up a process whereby the LA 2024 and Paris 2024 bid committees met with the IOC to discuss who would host the Games in 2024 and 2028, and whether it was possible to select the host cities for both at the same time.[15]

Following the decision to award the two Games simultaneously, Paris was understood as the preferred host for 2024. On 31 July 2017, the IOC announced Los Angeles as the sole candidate for 2028,[16][17] enabling Paris to be confirmed as host for 2024. Both decisions were ratified at the 131st IOC Session on 13 September 2017.[18]

Host city election

Paris was elected as the host city on 13 September 2017 at the 131st IOC Session in Lima, Peru. The two French IOC members, Guy Drut and Tony Estanguet, were ineligible to vote under the rules of the Olympic Charter.

2024 Summer Olympics
bidding results
City Nation Votes
Paris  France Unanimous

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Bids for the 2024 and 2028 Summer Olympics

Bids for the 2024 and 2028 Summer Olympics

Five bids were initially submitted for the 2024 Summer Olympics. Following withdrawals, two bidding cities—Paris and Los Angeles—were left in the process. In July 2017, the IOC agreed to award the 2024 and 2028 Games simultaneously. Los Angeles agreed to bid for the 2028 Games, effectively ceding the 2024 Games to Paris.

Paris bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

Paris bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

The Paris bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics and Summer Paralympics is the successful bid to bring the Games of the XXXIII Olympiad and the XVII Paralympic Games, to the French capital city. Paris formally announced its intention to bid on 23 June 2015 – the date on which Olympic Day is globally celebrated. Following withdrawals in the 2024 Summer Olympics bidding process that led to just two candidate cities, the IOC announced that the 2028 Summer Olympics would be awarded at the same time as the 2024 Games. After Los Angeles agreed on 31 July 2017 to host the 2028 Games. It was officially announced at the IOC Session in Lima, Peru.

Hamburg bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

Hamburg bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

The Hamburg bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics was a cancelled bid of Hamburg to host the 2024 Summer Olympics.

Budapest bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

Budapest bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

The Budapest bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics and Summer Paralympics was announced by the Hungarian Olympic Committee on 11 November 2013, although organisers had been planning a bid since 2008. However, on March 1st, 2017, Budapest withdrew its bid to host the 2024 Summer Olympics, leaving only Los Angeles and Paris in the race.

Rome bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

Rome bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics

The Rome bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics and Summer Paralympics was an attempt to bring the 2024 Summer Olympics to the city of Rome. On 21 September 2016, Rome withdrew its bid for the Games.

Lausanne

Lausanne

Lausanne is the capital and largest city of the Swiss French speaking canton of Vaud. It is a hilly city situated on the shores of Lake Geneva, about halfway between the Jura Mountains and the Alps, and facing the French town of Évian-les-Bains across the lake. Lausanne is located 62 kilometres northeast of Geneva, the nearest major city.

131st IOC Session

131st IOC Session

The 131st IOC Session took place between September 13 – September 16, 2017 at the Lima Convention Centre in Lima, Peru. The host cities for the 2024 Summer Olympics and the 2028 Summer Olympics were elected during the 131st IOC Session on September 13, 2017.

Lima

Lima

Lima, originally founded as Ciudad de Los Reyes is the capital and largest city of Peru. It is located in the valleys of the Chillón, Rímac and Lurín Rivers, in the desert zone of the central coastal part of the country, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Together with the seaside city of Callao, it forms a contiguous urban area known as the Lima Metropolitan Area. With a population of more than 9.7 million in its urban area and more than 11 million in its metropolitan area, Lima is one of the largest cities in the Americas.

Guy Drut

Guy Drut

Guy Drut is an Olympic champion and politician who won gold at the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal in the 110 m hurdles. In 1996, he became a member of the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Olympic Charter

Olympic Charter

The Olympic Charter is a set of rules and guidelines for the organisation of the Olympic Games, and for governing the Olympic movement. Its last revision was on the 17th of July 2020 during the 136th IOC Session, held by video conference. Adopted by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), it is the codification of the fundamental principles, rules and by-laws. French and English are the official languages of the Olympic Charter.

Paris

Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,165,423 residents in 2019 in an area of more than 105 km², making it the 30th most densely populated city in the world in 2020. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of the world's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, gastronomy, and science. For its leading role in the arts and sciences, as well as its very early system of street lighting, in the 19th century it became known as "the City of Light". Like London, prior to the Second World War, it was also sometimes called the capital of the world.

France

France

France, officially the French Republic, is a country primarily located in Western Europe. It also includes overseas regions and territories in the Americas and the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans, giving it one of the largest discontiguous exclusive economic zones in the world. Its metropolitan area extends from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean and from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea; overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, Saint Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic, the French West Indies, and many islands in Oceania and the Indian Ocean. Its eighteen integral regions span a combined area of 643,801 km2 (248,573 sq mi) and contain over 68 million people.

The Games

Ceremonies

A viewing party for the 2020 Summer Olympics at Place du Trocadéro, which will host the official protocol for 2024.
A viewing party for the 2020 Summer Olympics at Place du Trocadéro, which will host the official protocol for 2024.

In July 2021, Paris 2024 president Tony Estanguet stated that the COJOP2024 was conducting a feasibility study on hosting the opening and closing ceremonies outside of a traditional stadium setting, so that they could "marry the best of Paris–the iconic sites–to the possibility of engaging with hundreds of thousands of people, maybe more."[19] This concept of an "open Games" was exemplified in the Paris 2024 handover presentation during the Tokyo 2020 closing ceremony,[19] which featured a live segment from a viewing party at Place du Trocadéro.[20] Estanguet expected the sites for the ceremonies to be announced by the end of the year.[19]

On 13 December 2021, it was announced that the opening ceremony will feature athletes being transported by boat from Pont d'Austerlitz to Pont d'Iéna along the Seine river. The 6 km (3.7 miles) route will pass landmarks such as the Louvre, Notre-Dame de Paris, and Place de la Concorde, and feature cultural presentations. The official protocol will take place at a 30,000 seat "mini-stadium" at the Trocadéro. Organisers stated that the ceremony would be the most "spectacular and accessible opening ceremony in Olympic history", with Estanguet stating that it would be free to attend, and estimating that it could attract as many as 600,000 spectators.[21][22][23]

On 23 September 2022, the ceremonies' creative director Thomas Jolly announced that Stade de France would host the closing ceremonies for both the Olympics and Paralympics.[24]

Sports

The current rules of the International Olympic Committee, which have been in force since 2017, the programme of the Summer Olympics consists of 28 mandatory "core" sports that persist between Games, and that up to 6 optional sports can be added in each edition of the Summer Olympics per edition. They are selected by the Organizing Committee of each edition and must be included in a list that will be sent to the International Olympic Committee within 5 years before each edition, in order to improve local interest,[25][26] provided that the total number of participants does not exceed 10,500 athletes.[27] During the 131st IOC Session in September 2017, the IOC approved the 28 sports of the 2016 programme for Paris 2024, while also inviting the Paris Organising Committee to submit up to five additional sports for consideration.[28][29]

When Paris was bidding for the games in August 2017, the Paris Organising Committee announced that it would hold talks with the IOC and professional esports organisations about the possibility of introducing competitive events in 2024.[30][31] In July 2018, the IOC confirmed it would not consider esports for the 2024 Olympics.[32] On 21 February 2019, the Paris Organising Committee announced they would propose the inclusion of breakdancing (breaking), as well as skateboarding, sport climbing, and surfing—three sports which debuted at the then-upcoming 2020 Summer Olympics as optional sports.[33][34][32] All four sports were approved during the 134th IOC Session in Lausanne, Switzerland on 24 June 2019.[34][32][35]

The 2024 Summer Olympic program is scheduled to feature 32 sports encompassing 329 events, the first Summer Olympics since 1960 to have fewer events than the preceding edition (Tokyo 2020 had 339). The number of events in each discipline is noted in parentheses. Disciplines that lost events from 2020 included karate (8) and baseball/softball (2) which were dropped from the program, and weightlifting which lost 4 events. Canoe sprint surrendered two events to canoe slalom but kept the overall canoe total at 16. Sports that gained events were breaking (2), introduced as a new discipline, and sports climbing, where the distinct events of speed climbing, and 'boulder & lead' were disaggregated from the previous 'combined' event to create 2 new events.[36]

2024 Summer Olympic Sports program

Qualifying National Olympic Committees

*The following is a list of National Olympic Committees who have at least one athlete who has qualified for the 2024 Olympics.

Participating National Olympic Committees

Number of athletes by National Olympic Committee

As of 27 January 2023

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Paris Organising Committee for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games

Paris Organising Committee for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games

The Paris Organising Committee for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games (COJOP2024) is the organising committee for the 2024 Summer Olympics and the 2024 Summer Paralympics which are scheduled to be held in Paris, France. Tony Estanguet serves as president of the committee. Étienne Thobois serves as director general. The committee was established on 18 January 2018.

2020 Summer Olympics closing ceremony

2020 Summer Olympics closing ceremony

The closing ceremony of the 2020 Summer Olympics took place in the Olympic Stadium in Tokyo for about two and a half hours from 20:00 (JST) on 8 August 2021. The closing ceremony of the Olympic Games, which was postponed for one year due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, was held without spectators. The scale was also reduced compared to past ceremonies as athletes were required to leave the Olympic Village 48 hours after their competitions finished.

Boat parade

Boat parade

Boat parades are a waterway event with illuminated boats. Some of the well known water parades include locations such as Walt Disney World, the Newport Beach Christmas Boat Parade, and Fort Lauderdale.

Louvre

Louvre

The Louvre, or the Louvre Museum, is the world's most-visited museum, and a historic landmark in Paris, France. It is the home of some of the best-known works of art, including the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo. A central landmark of the city, it is located on the Right Bank of the Seine in the city's 1st arrondissement. At any given point in time, approximately 38,000 objects from prehistory to the 21st century are being exhibited over an area of 72,735 square meters. Attendance in 2022 was 7.8 million visitors, up 170 percent from 2021, but still below the 10.8 million visitors in 2018 before COVID.

Notre-Dame de Paris

Notre-Dame de Paris

Notre-Dame de Paris, referred to simply as Notre-Dame, is a medieval Catholic cathedral on the Île de la Cité, in the 4th arrondissement of Paris. The cathedral, dedicated to the Virgin Mary, is considered one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture. Several of its attributes set it apart from the earlier Romanesque style, particularly its pioneering use of the rib vault and flying buttress, its enormous and colourful rose windows, and the naturalism and abundance of its sculptural decoration. Notre Dame also stands out for its musical components, notably its three pipe organs and its immense church bells.

Place de la Concorde

Place de la Concorde

The Place de la Concorde is one of the major public squares in Paris, France. Measuring 7.6 ha in area, it is the largest square in the French capital. It is located in the city's eighth arrondissement, at the eastern end of the Champs-Élysées.

131st IOC Session

131st IOC Session

The 131st IOC Session took place between September 13 – September 16, 2017 at the Lima Convention Centre in Lima, Peru. The host cities for the 2024 Summer Olympics and the 2028 Summer Olympics were elected during the 131st IOC Session on September 13, 2017.

2016 Summer Olympics

2016 Summer Olympics

The 2016 Summer Olympics, officially the Games of the XXXI Olympiad and also known as Rio 2016, was an international multi-sport event held from 5 to 21 August 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with preliminary events in some sports beginning on 3 August. Rio de Janeiro was announced as the host city at the 121st IOC Session in Copenhagen, Denmark, on 2 October 2009.

Esports

Esports

Esports, short for electronic sports, is a form of competition using video games. Esports often takes the form of organized, multiplayer video game competitions, particularly between professional players, individually or as teams. Although organized competitions have long been a part of video game culture, these were largely between amateurs until the late 2000s, when participation by professional gamers and spectatorship in these events through live streaming saw a large surge in popularity. By the 2010s, esports was a significant factor in the video game industry, with many game developers actively designing and providing funding for tournaments and other events.

Breaking at the Summer Olympics

Breaking at the Summer Olympics

The 2024 Summer Olympics will introduce the sport of breaking or breakdancing to the Summer Olympic program for the first time. There will be two medal events, one each for men and women, with 16 "b-boys" and "b-girls" competing. Breaking previously featured at the 2018 Summer Youth Olympics. IOC President Thomas Bach stated that they added breakdancing as part of an effort to draw more interest from young people in the Olympics. The international organizing body is the World DanceSport Federation.

134th IOC Session

134th IOC Session

The 134th IOC Session was the IOC Session which was held in Lausanne, Switzerland on 24 June 2019.

Lausanne

Lausanne

Lausanne is the capital and largest city of the Swiss French speaking canton of Vaud. It is a hilly city situated on the shores of Lake Geneva, about halfway between the Jura Mountains and the Alps, and facing the French town of Évian-les-Bains across the lake. Lausanne is located 62 kilometres northeast of Geneva, the nearest major city.

Calendar

The following schedule is correct as of the press release by COJOP2024 in July 2022. The exact schedule may change in due time.

All times and dates use Central European Summer Time (UTC+2)
OC Opening ceremony Event competitions 1 Gold medal events CC Closing ceremony
July/August 2024 July August Events
24th
Wed
25th
Thu
26th
Fri
27th
Sat
28th
Sun
29th
Mon
30th
Tue
31st
Wed
1st
Thu
2nd
Fri
3rd
Sat
4th
Sun
5th
Mon
6th
Tue
7th
Wed
8th
Thu
9th
Fri
10th
Sat
11th
Sun
Olympic Rings Icon.svg Ceremonies OC CC
Aquatics Synchronized swimming pictogram.svg Artistic swimming 1 1 2
Diving pictogram.svg Diving 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8
Open water swimming pictogram.svg Marathon swimming 1 1 2
Swimming pictogram.svg Swimming 4 3 5 3 5 4 3 4 4 35
Water polo pictogram.svg Water polo 1 1 2
Archery pictogram.svg Archery 1 1 1 1 1 5
Athletics pictogram.svg Athletics 2 1 5 3 3 5 5 6 8 9 1 48
Badminton pictogram.svg Badminton 1 1 1 2 5
Basketball Basketball pictogram.svg Basketball 1 1 2
3x3 basketball pictogram.svg 3×3 Basketball 2 2
Boxing pictogram.svg Boxing 1 2 2 4 4 13
Breakdancing pictogram.svg Breaking 1 1 2
Canoeing Canoeing (slalom) pictogram.svg Slalom 1 1 1 1 2 6
Canoeing (flatwater) pictogram.svg Sprint 4 3 3 10
Cycling Cycling (road) pictogram.svg Road cycling 2 1 1 4
Cycling (track) pictogram.svg Track cycling 1 1 2 2 2 1 3 12
Cycling (BMX) pictogram.svg BMX 2 2 4
Cycling (mountain biking) pictogram.svg Mountain biking 1 1 2
Equestrian
Equestrian Dressage pictogram.svg Dressage 1 1 2
Equestrian Eventing pictogram.svg Eventing 2 2
Equestrian Jumping pictogram.svg Jumping 1 1 2
Fencing pictogram.svg Fencing 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 12
Field hockey pictogram.svg Field hockey 1 1 2
Football pictogram.svg Football 1 1 2
Golf pictogram.svg Golf 1 1 2
Gymnastics Gymnastics (artistic) pictogram.svg Artistic 1 1 1 1 4 3 3 14
Gymnastics (rhythmic) pictogram.svg Rhythmic 1 1 2
Gymnastics (trampoline) pictogram.svg Trampoline 2 2
Handball pictogram.svg Handball 1 1 2
Judo pictogram.svg Judo 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 15
Modern pentathlon pictogram.svg Modern pentathlon 1 1 2
Rowing pictogram.svg Rowing 2 4 4 4 14
Rugby sevens pictogram.svg Rugby sevens 1 1 2
Sailing pictogram.svg Sailing 2 2 2 2 2 10
Shooting pictogram.svg Shooting 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 15
Skateboarding pictogram.svg Skateboarding 1 1 1 1 4
Climbing pictogram.svg Sport climbing 1 1 1 1 4
Surfing pictogram.svg Surfing 2 2
Table tennis pictogram.svg Table tennis 1 1 1 1 1 5
Taekwondo pictogram.svg Taekwondo 2 2 2 2 8
Tennis pictogram.svg Tennis 1 2 2 5
Triathlon pictogram.svg Triathlon 1 1 1 3
Volleyball Volleyball (beach) pictogram.svg Beach volleyball 1 1 2
Volleyball (indoor) pictogram.svg Volleyball 1 1 2
Weightlifting pictogram.svg Weightlifting 2 2 2 3 1 10
Wrestling pictogram.svg Wrestling 3 3 3 3 3 3 18
Daily medal events 14 13 18 14 17 19 22 28 20 16 15 21 27 33 39 13 329
Cumulative total 14 27 45 59 76 95 117 145 165 181 196 217 244 277 316 329
July/August 2024 24th
Wed
25th
Thu
26th
Fri
27th
Sat
28th
Sun
29th
Mon
30th
Tue
31st
Wed
1st
Thu
2nd
Fri
3rd
Sat
4th
Sun
5th
Mon
6th
Tue
7th
Wed
8th
Thu
9th
Fri
10th
Sat
11th
Sun
Total events
July August


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Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time

Central European Summer Time (CEST), sometimes referred to as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+02:00, which makes it the same as Eastern European Time, Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time, Egypt Standard Time and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.

Artistic swimming at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Artistic swimming at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Artistic swimming competitions at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris, France are scheduled to run between 5 and 10 August at the Paris Aquatics Centre. Unlike in the previous edition, the number of swimmers competing across two events at these Games has been reduced from 104 to 96.

Diving at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Diving at the 2024 Summer Olympics

The diving competitions at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run from 27 July to 10 August 2024 at the Paris Aquatics Centre. A total of 136 divers, with an equal distribution between men and women, will compete across eight medal events at these Games, the exact same amount as Tokyo 2020.

Archery at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Archery at the 2024 Summer Olympics

The archery competitions at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run over a seven-day period, from 25 July to 4 August, at Les Invalides. 128 archers will compete across five events, with the successful mixed team recurve returning to the Olympic program for the second time.

Athletics at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Athletics at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Athletics at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Athletics at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Athletics at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run over a ten-day period at two different venues from 1 to 11 August 2024, featuring a total of 48 medal events across three distinct sets: track and field, road running, and racewalking.

Badminton at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Badminton at the 2024 Summer Olympics

The badminton tournaments at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run from 27 July to 5 August at Porte de la Chapelle Arena. A total of 172 badminton players, with an equal distribution between men and women, will compete across five medal events at these Games, the exact same amount as those in the previous editions.

Basketball at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Basketball at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Basketball at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris, France will be held from 27 July to 11 August 2024. Preliminary 5-on-5 basketball matches will occur at Pierre Mauroy Stadium in Lille, with the final phase staging at the Bercy Arena in Paris. Returning to the program for the second time in history, the 3×3 competitions will be played at Place de la Concorde.

Canoeing at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Canoeing at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Canoeing at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run across two main disciplines: canoe slalom, to take place from 27 July to 5 August, and canoe sprint, from 6 to 10 August. Both canoe slalom and sprint events will be staged at the National Olympic Nautical Stadium of Île-de-France in Vaires-sur-Marne.

Cycling at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Cycling at the 2024 Summer Olympics

The cycling competitions of the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run at four different venues from 27 July to 11 August, featuring twenty-two events across five disciplines.

Equestrian at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Equestrian at the 2024 Summer Olympics

The equestrian events at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run from 27 July to 6 August at the Palace of Versailles, featuring 200 riders across three disciplines for both individual and team competitions, namely dressage, eventing, and jumping.

Fencing at the 2024 Summer Olympics

Fencing at the 2024 Summer Olympics

The fencing competitions at the 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris are scheduled to run from 27 July to 4 August at the Grand Palais strip. A total of 212 fencers, with an equal distribution between men and women, will compete across twelve medal events at the Games. For the second straight time, Paris 2024 will witness both men and women fence against each other in the individual and team events held in all three weapons.

Venues

Most of the Olympic events will be held in the city of Paris and its metropolitan region, including the neighbouring cities of Saint-Denis, Le Bourget, Nanterre, Versailles, and Vaires-sur-Marne. The handball tournaments will be held in Lille, which is 225km from the host city; the sailing and some football games will be held in the Mediterranean city of Marseille, which is 777km from the host city; meanwhile, the surfing events are expected to be held in Teahupo'o village in the overseas territory of French Polynesia, which is 15,716 km from the host city. Football will also be hosted in another 5 cities, which are Bordeaux, Décines-Charpieu, Nantes, Nice and Saint-Étienne, some of which are home to Ligue 1 clubs.

Grand Paris zone (seven sports)

Stade de France with uncovered athletics track during the 2003 World Championships
Stade de France with uncovered athletics track during the 2003 World Championships
Centre Aquatique during construction (2022)
Centre Aquatique during construction (2022)
Venue Events Capacity Status
Yves du Manoir Stadium Field hockey 15,000 Renovated
Stade de France Rugby 7's 77,083 Existing
Athletics (track and field)
Closing Ceremony
Paris La Défense Arena[a] Aquatics (swimming, water polo playoffs) 15,220
Porte de La Chapelle Arena Badminton 8,000 Additional
Gymnastics (rhythmic)
Paris Aquatic Centre[37][38] Aquatics (water polo preliminaries, diving, artistic swimming) 5,000
Le Bourget Climbing Venue Sport climbing 5,000 Temporary
Arena Paris Nord Boxing (preliminaries, quarterfinals) Existing
Modern pentathlon (fencing ranking rounds)
Notes
  1. ^ The local organising committee uses the non-sponsored name Arena 92, which was the venue's name during its initial planning phase. By the time it opened in 2017, the name had changed to U Arena (also non-sponsored) and then to the current Paris La Défense Arena in 2018 through a sponsorship deal.

Paris Centre zone (20 sports)

Venue Events Capacity Status
Parc des Princes Football (finals) 48,583 Existing
Roland Garros Stadium Tennis 34,000
Boxing (semifinals, finals)
Philippe Chatrier Court (with retractable roof) Boxing (semifinals, finals) 15,000
Tennis
Court Suzanne Lenglen (with retractable roof)[39] Tennis 10,000
Court Simonne Mathieu and secondary courts 9,000 (5,000+2,000+8x250)
Paris Expo Porte de Versailles Volleyball 12,000
Table Tennis 6,000
Weightlifting 6,000
Bercy Arena Gymnastics (artistic and trampoline) 15,000
Basketball (quarterfinals, semifinals, finals)
Grand Palais Fencing 8,000
Taekwondo
Place de la Concorde Basketball (3x3) 30,000 Temporary
Breakdancing
Cycling (BMX freestyle)
Skateboarding
Pont d'Iéna Aquatics (marathon swimming) 13,000
(3,000 sitting)
Athletics (marathon, race walk)
Cycling (road, time trial)
Triathlon
Eiffel Tower Stadium Beach Volleyball 12,000
Grand Palais Éphémère Judo 8,000
Wrestling
Les Invalides Archery 8,000

Versailles zone (four sports)

Vaires-Torcy Nautical Centre
Vaires-Torcy Nautical Centre
Venue Events Capacity Status
Palace of Versailles Equestrian (dressage, jumping, eventing cross country) 80,000
(22,000 + 58,000)
Temporary
Modern pentathlon (excluding fencing ranking rounds)
Le Golf National Golf 35,000 Existing
Élancourt Hill Cycling (Mountain biking) 25,000
Vélodrome de Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines Cycling (track) 5,000
Cycling (BMX racing) 5,000

Outlying (seven sports)

Venue Events Capacity Status
Pierre Mauroy Stadium (Lille) Basketball (preliminaries) 26,000 Existing
Handball (quarterfinals, semifinals, finals)
National Olympic Nautical Stadium of Île-de-France (Vaires-sur-Marne) Rowing 22,000
Canoe-Kayak (sprint)
Canoe-Kayak (slalom)
Stade Vélodrome (Marseille) Football (6 preliminaries, women's quarter-final, men's semi-final) 67,394
Parc Olympique Lyonnais (Lyon) Football (6 preliminaries, men's quarter-final, women's semi-final) 59,186
Stade Matmut Atlantique (Bordeaux) Football (6 preliminaries, women's quarter-final, men's 3rd place match) 42,115
Stade Geoffroy-Guichard (Saint-Étienne) Football (6 preliminaries, men's quarter-final, women's 3rd place match) 41,965
Allianz Riviera (Nice) Football (6 preliminaries, quarterfinals) 35,624
Stade de la Beaujoire (Nantes) Football (6 preliminaries, quarterfinals) 35,322
Port de la Pointe Rouge (Marseille) Sailing 5,000
Débarcadère Teahupoo (Teahupo'o, French Polynesia) Surfing 5,000
National Shooting Centre (Châteauroux) Shooting 3,000

Non-competitive

Venue Events Capacity Status
Jardins du Trocadéro and River Seine Opening Ceremony 600,000 Temporary
L'Île-Saint-Denis Olympic Village 17,000 Additional
Le Bourget Media Village Temporary
International Broadcast Centre
Main Press Centre

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Le Bourget

Le Bourget

Le Bourget is a commune in the northeastern suburbs of Paris, France. It is located 10.6 km from the center of Paris.

Nanterre

Nanterre

Nanterre is the prefecture of the Hauts-de-Seine department in the western suburbs of Paris. It is located some 11 km (6.8 mi) northwest of the centre of Paris. In 2018, the commune had a population of 96,807.

Lille

Lille

Lille is a city in the northern part of France, in French Flanders. On the river Deûle, near France's border with Belgium, it is the capital of the Hauts-de-France region, the prefecture of the Nord department, and the main city of the European Metropolis of Lille.

Marseille

Marseille

Marseille is the prefecture of the French department of Bouches-du-Rhône and capital of the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region. Situated in the Provence region of southern France, it is located on the coast of the Gulf of Lion, part of the Mediterranean Sea, near the mouth of the Rhône river. Its inhabitants are called Marseillais.

French Polynesia

French Polynesia

French Polynesia is an overseas collectivity of France and its sole overseas country. It comprises 121 geographically dispersed islands and atolls stretching over more than 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) in the South Pacific Ocean. The total land area of French Polynesia is 3,521 square kilometres (1,359 sq mi), with a population of 278,786.

Bordeaux

Bordeaux

Bordeaux is a port city on the river Garonne in the Gironde department, Southwestern France. It is the capital of the Nouvelle-Aquitaine region, as well as the prefecture of the Gironde department. Its inhabitants are called "Bordelais" (masculine) or "Bordelaises" (feminine). The term "Bordelais" may also refer to the city and its surrounding region.

Décines-Charpieu

Décines-Charpieu

Décines-Charpieu is a commune in the Metropolis of Lyon in Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in eastern France. The name of the city is often shortened and simply called Décines.

Nantes

Nantes

Nantes is a city in Loire-Atlantique on the Loire, 50 km (31 mi) from the Atlantic coast. The city is the sixth largest in France, with a population of 314,138 in Nantes proper and a metropolitan area of nearly 1 million inhabitants (2018). With Saint-Nazaire, a seaport on the Loire estuary, Nantes forms one of the main north-western French metropolitan agglomerations.

Nice

Nice

Nice is the prefecture of the Alpes-Maritimes department in France. The Nice agglomeration extends far beyond the administrative city limits, with a population of nearly 1 million on an area of 744 km2 (287 sq mi). Located on the French Riviera, the southeastern coast of France on the Mediterranean Sea, at the foot of the French Alps, Nice is the second-largest French city on the Mediterranean coast and second-largest city in the Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur region after Marseille. Nice is approximately 13 kilometres (8 mi) from the principality of Monaco and 30 kilometres (19 mi) from the French–Italian border. Nice's airport serves as a gateway to the region.

Ligue 1

Ligue 1

Ligue 1, officially known as Ligue 1 Uber Eats for sponsorship reasons, is a French professional league for men's association football clubs. At the top of the French football league system, it is the country's primary football competition. Administrated by the Ligue de Football Professionnel, Ligue 1 is contested by 20 clubs and operates on a system of promotion and relegation from and to Ligue 2.

2003 World Championships in Athletics

2003 World Championships in Athletics

The 9th World Championships in Athletics, under the auspices of the International Association of Athletics Federations, were held from 23 August to 31 August 2003 in the Stade de France in Saint-Denis, Seine-Saint-Denis, France.

Paris La Défense Arena

Paris La Défense Arena

Paris La Défense Arena is a multi-use domed stadium in Nanterre, a western suburb of Paris. Opened in October 2017, it was developed by the rugby union club Racing 92, and replaced Stade Olympique Yves-du-Manoir as their home field. It is one of the two multi-use domed stadiums to be built in Europe, along with Telenor Arena and is Europe’s largest indoor arena. Its naming rights are held by Paris La Défense, the management company of the nearby La Défense business district.

Marketing

Emblem

The Olympic Phryge (left), the official mascot of the 2024 Summer Olympics, and the Paralympic Phryge (right), the official mascot of the 2024 Summer Paralympics
The Olympic Phryge (left), the official mascot of the 2024 Summer Olympics, and the Paralympic Phryge (right), the official mascot of the 2024 Summer Paralympics

The emblem for the 2024 Summer Olympics and Paralympics was unveiled on 21 October 2019 at the Grand Rex. Inspired by Art Deco,[40][41] it is a representation of Marianne, the national personification of France, with a flame formed in negative space by her hair. The emblem also resembles a gold medal. Tony Estanguet explained that the emblem symbolised "the power and the magic of the Games", and the Games being "for people". The use of a female figure also serves as an homage to the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris, which were the first to allow women to participate.[42] The emblem was designed by the French designer Sylvain Boyer[43] with the French design agencies Ecobranding & Royalties.[44][45][43]

The emblem for Paris 2024 was considered the biggest new logo release of 2019 by many design magazines.[46][47] An Opinion Way survey shows that 83 percent of French people say they like the new Paris 2024 Games emblem. Approval ratings were high, with 82 percent of those surveyed finding it aesthetically appealing and 78 percent finding it to be creative.[48] It was met with some mockery on social media, one user commenting that the logo "would be better suited to a dating site or a hair salon".[49]

For the first time,since the 1960 Summer Paralympics, the 2024 Summer Paralympics are sharing the same logo, as their corresponding Olympics, with no difference, reflecting a shared "ambition" between both events.[50]

Corporate sponsorship

Sponsors of the 2024 Summer Olympics
Worldwide Olympic Partners
Premium Partners
Official Partners
Official Supporters

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2024 Summer Paralympics

2024 Summer Paralympics

The 2024 Summer Paralympics, commonly known as the Games of the XVII Paralympiad, and commonly known as Paris 2024, is an upcoming international multi-sport parasports event governed by the International Paralympic Committee, to be held in Paris, France, from 28 August to 8 September 2024. These games mark the first time Paris will host the Paralympics in its history and the second time that France will host the Paralympic Games, as Tignes and Albertville joint hosted the 1992 Winter Paralympics. The final decision was made by the IOC on 13 September 2017, at their annual session in Lima, Peru.

Grand Rex

Grand Rex

Le Grand Rex is a Parisian cinema and concert venue.

Art Deco in Paris

Art Deco in Paris

The Art Deco movement of architecture and design appeared in Paris in about 1910–12, and continued until the beginning of World War II in 1939. It took its name from the International Exposition of Modern Decorative and Industrial Arts held in Paris in 1925. It was characterized by bold geometric forms, bright colors, and highly stylized decoration, and it symbolized modernity and luxury. Art Deco architecture, sculpture, and decoration reached its peak at 1939 Exposition Internationale des Arts et Techniques dans la Vie Moderne, and in movie theaters, department stores, other public buildings. It also featured in the work of Paris jewelers, graphic artists, furniture craftsmen, and jewelers, and glass and metal design. Many Art Deco landmarks, including the Théâtre des Champs-Élysées and the Palais de Chaillot, can be seen today in Paris.

Marianne

Marianne

Marianne has been the national personification of the French Republic since the French Revolution, as a personification of liberty, equality, fraternity and reason, as well as a portrayal of the Goddess of Liberty.

1900 Summer Olympics

1900 Summer Olympics

The 1900 Summer Olympics, today officially known as the Games of the II Olympiad and also known as Paris 1900, were an international multi-sport event that took place in Paris, France, from 14 May to 28 October 1900. No opening or closing ceremonies were held.

1960 Summer Paralympics

1960 Summer Paralympics

The 9th Annual International Stoke Mandeville Games, retroactively designated as the 1960 Summer Paralympics, were the first international Paralympic Games, following on from the Stoke Mandeville Games of 1948 and 1952. They were organised under the aegis of the International Stoke Mandeville Games Federation. The term "Paralympic Games" was approved by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) first in 1984, while the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) was formed in 1989.

Airbnb

Airbnb

Airbnb, Inc. is an American San Francisco-based company operating an online marketplace for short-term homestays and experiences. The company acts as a broker and charges a commission from each booking. The company was founded in 2008 by Brian Chesky, Nathan Blecharczyk, and Joe Gebbia. Airbnb is a shortened version of its original name, AirBedandBreakfast.com. The company has been the subject of criticism for lack of regulations and enabling increases in home rents.

Alibaba Group

Alibaba Group

Alibaba Group Holding Limited, also known as Alibaba, is a Chinese multinational technology company specializing in e-commerce, retail, Internet, and technology. Founded on 28 June 1999 in Hangzhou, Zhejiang, the company provides consumer-to-consumer (C2C), business-to-consumer (B2C), and business-to-business (B2B) sales services via web portals, as well as electronic payment services, shopping search engines, and cloud computing services. It owns and operates a diverse portfolio of companies around the world in numerous business sectors.

Allianz

Allianz

Allianz is a European multinational financial services company headquartered in Munich, Germany. Its core businesses are insurance and asset management.

Atos

Atos

Atos is a European multinational information technology (IT) service and consulting company headquartered in Bezons, France and offices worldwide. It specialises in hi-tech transactional services, unified communications, cloud, big data and cybersecurity services. Atos operates worldwide under the brands Atos, Atos|Syntel, Atos Consulting, Atos Healthcare, Atos Worldgrid, Groupe Bull, Canopy, Maven Wave, and Unify.

Bridgestone

Bridgestone

Bridgestone Corporation is a Japanese multinational tire manufacturer founded in 1931 by Shojiro Ishibashi (1889–1976) in the city of Kurume, Fukuoka, Japan. The name Bridgestone comes from a calque translation and transposition of ishibashi (石橋), meaning 'stone bridge' in Japanese.

Deloitte

Deloitte

Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu Limited, commonly referred to as Deloitte, is an international professional services network headquartered in London, England. Deloitte is the largest professional services network by revenue and number of professionals in the world and is considered one of the Big Four accounting firms along with EY, KPMG and PricewaterhouseCoopers (PWC).

Broadcasting rights

In France, domestic rights to the 2024 Summer Olympics are owned by Warner Bros. Discovery (formerly Discovery Inc.) via Eurosport, with free-to-air coverage sub-licensed to the country's public broadcaster France Télévisions.[56]

^1 – Included nations & territories are Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Niue, Palau, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.

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Eurosport

Eurosport

Eurosport is a group of pay television networks in Europe and parts of Asia. Owned by Warner Bros. Discovery through its international sports unit, it operates two main channels—Eurosport 1 and Eurosport 2—across most of its territories, and streams on Discovery+, which superseded Eurosport Player.

France Télévisions

France Télévisions

France Télévisions is the French national public television broadcaster. It is a state-owned company formed from the integration of the public television channels France 2 and France 3, later joined by the legally independent channels France 4, France 5 and France Info.

Asia

Asia

Asia is one of the world's most notable geographical regions, which is either considered a continent in its own right or a subcontinent of Eurasia, which shares the continental landmass of Afro-Eurasia with Africa. Asia covers an area of 44,579,000 square kilometres (17,212,000 sq mi), about 30% of Earth's total land area and 8.7% of Earth's total surface area. The continent, which has long been home to the majority of the human population, was the site of many of the first civilizations. Its 4.7 billion people constitute roughly 60% of the world's population, having more people than all other continents combined.

Dentsu

Dentsu

Dentsu Inc. is a Japanese international advertising and public relations joint stock company headquartered in Tokyo. Dentsu is currently the largest advertising agency in Japan and the fifth largest advertising agency network in the world in terms of worldwide revenues.

Nine Network

Nine Network

The Nine Network is an Australian commercial free-to-air television network. It is owned by parent company Nine Entertainment and is one of five main free-to-air television networks in Australia.

RTBF

RTBF

The Radio-télévision belge de la Communauté française is a public service broadcaster delivering radio and television services to the French-speaking Community of Belgium, in Wallonia and Brussels. Its counterpart in the Flemish Community is the Dutch-language VRT, and in the German-speaking Community it is BRF.

Grupo Globo

Grupo Globo

Grupo Globo, formerly known as Organizações Globo, is a Brazilian private mass media conglomerate based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Founded in 1925 by Irineu Marinho, it is the largest media group in Latin America, and one of the world's largest media conglomerates.

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, branded as CBC/Radio-Canada, is the Canadian public broadcaster for both radio and television. It is a federal Crown corporation that receives funding from the government. The English- and French-language service units of the corporation are commonly known as CBC and Radio-Canada, respectively.

China Media Group

China Media Group

China Media Group also known as Voice of China, is the predominant state media company by means of radio and television broadcasting in the People's Republic of China. It was founded on 21 March 2018, as a fusion of all state-holding media enterprises including China Central Television, China National Radio, and China Radio International. China Media Group is under the direct control of the Central Propaganda Department of the Chinese Communist Party.

Caracol Televisión

Caracol Televisión

Caracol Televisión is a Colombian free-to-air television network owned by Caracol Medios, a unit of Grupo Valorem. It is one of the leading private TV networks in Colombia, alongside Canal RCN and Canal 1. The network distributes and produces 5,000+ programs and has aired in more than 80 countries.

DR (broadcaster)

DR (broadcaster)

DR, officially the Danish Broadcasting Corporation in English, is a Danish public-service radio and television broadcasting company. Founded in 1925 as a public-service organization, it is Denmark's oldest and largest electronic media enterprise. DR is a founding member of the European Broadcasting Union.

Postimees Group

Postimees Group

AS Postimees Grupp, formerly known as AS Postimees and AS Eesti Meedia, is an Estonian media holding company headquartered in Tallinn. The company is currently owned by MM Group, having acquired the half of the company from Norwegian company Schibsted in 2013 and bought the remaining half in 2015. The group is one of the largest media group in the Baltics. Among the Group's activities are creation of print and online media, production of television and radio, e-commerce.

Source: "2024 Summer Olympics", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, February 1st), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2024_Summer_Olympics.

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See also
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External links
Summer Olympics
Preceded by XXXIII Olympiad
Paris

2024
Succeeded by

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