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2023 Monterey Park shooting

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Monterey Park shooting
Part of mass shootings in the United States
Monterey Park 2023 shooting.png
Police on the scene of the shooting at the Star Ballroom Dance Studio
Los Angeles County, California
Encounters with perpetrator
Central area of Los Angeles County
LocationMonterey Park, California, U.S.
Coordinates34°03′43″N 118°07′25″W / 34.06194°N 118.12361°W / 34.06194; -118.12361Coordinates: 34°03′43″N 118°07′25″W / 34.06194°N 118.12361°W / 34.06194; -118.12361
DateJanuary 21, 2023 (2023-01-21)
c. 10:22 p.m.[1] (PST, UTC-8)
Attack type
Mass shooting, mass murder, murder–suicide[2]
WeaponsCobray M-11/9 semi-automatic pistol with high-capacity magazine and homemade suppressor[3] (weapon used in ballroom shooting)
Norinco Type 54 7.62x25mm semi-automatic pistol (weapon used in perpetrator's suicide)[4]
Deaths12 (including the perpetrator)
Injured9
PerpetratorHuu Can Tran
DefenderBrandon Tsay
MotiveUnknown

On January 21, 2023, a mass shooting occurred in Monterey Park, California, United States. The gunman killed eleven people and injured nine others.[5] The shooting happened at about 10:22 p.m. PST (UTC-8) at Star Ballroom Dance Studio, after an earlier all-day Lunar New Year Festival was held on a nearby street.[1][6] The perpetrator was identified as 72-year-old Huu Can Tran. He died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound during a standoff with Torrance police the next day.[7][8][9] It is the deadliest mass shooting in the history of Los Angeles County.[10]

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Mass shooting

Mass shooting

A mass shooting is a crime in which an attacker kills or injures multiple individuals simultaneously using a firearm. There is a lack of consensus on what constitutes a mass shooting, but most definitions include a minimum of three or four victims of gun violence, not including the shooter, in a short period of time. Definitions of mass shootings exclude warfare and often exclude instances of gang violence, armed robberies, and familicides.

Monterey Park, California

Monterey Park, California

Monterey Park is a city in the western San Gabriel Valley region of Los Angeles County, California, United States, approximately seven miles (11 km) east of the Downtown Los Angeles civic center. It is bordered by Alhambra, Los Angeles, Montebello and Rosemead. The city's motto is "Pride in the past, Faith in the future".

Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year is the festival that celebrates the beginning of a new year on the traditional lunisolar Chinese calendar. In Chinese, the festival is commonly referred to as the Spring Festival as the spring season in the lunisolar calendar traditionally starts with lichun, the first of the twenty-four solar terms which the festival celebrates around the time of the Chinese New Year. Marking the end of winter and the beginning of the spring season, observances traditionally take place from New Year's Eve, the evening preceding the first day of the year to the Lantern Festival, held on the 15th day of the year. The first day of Chinese New Year begins on the new moon that appears between 21 January and 20 February.

Torrance, California

Torrance, California

Torrance is a city in the Los Angeles metropolitan area located in Los Angeles County, California, United States. The city is part of what is known as the South Bay region of the metropolitan area. Torrance has 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of beachfront on the Pacific Ocean and a moderate year-round climate with an average rainfall of 12 inches (300 mm) per year. Torrance was incorporated in 1921, and at the 2020 census had a population of 147,067 residents. The city has 30 parks. The city consistently ranks among the safest cities in Los Angeles County. Torrance is also the birthplace of the American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO).

Los Angeles County, California

Los Angeles County, California

Los Angeles County, officially the County of Los Angeles, and sometimes abbreviated as L.A. County, is the most populous county in both the United States and its state of California, with 9,861,224 residents estimated as of 2022. It is the most populous non–state-level government entity in the United States. Its population is greater than that of 40 individual U.S. states. At 4,083 square miles (10,570 km2) and with 88 incorporated cities and many unincorporated areas, it is home to more than one-quarter of California residents and is one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the United States. Its county seat, Los Angeles, is also California's largest city and the second-most populous city in the United States, with about 3.9 million residents. In recent times, statewide droughts in California have placed great strain on the county’s water security.

Background

Monterey Park is in the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles County and lies about seven miles (11 km) east of downtown Los Angeles. About 65% of the residents are of Asian descent; in the 1990 census it became the first city in the mainland United States with a majority of residents of Asian descent.[5][11] Tens of thousands of people had gathered nearby on January 21, Lunar New Year's Eve, for the start of the two-day festival,[5][12] one of the largest Lunar New Year's celebrations in Southern California.[7] The festival was scheduled to end at 9:00 p.m. that day.[13]

The Star Ballroom Dance Studio is a Chinese-owned dance studio in the 100 block of West Garvey Avenue, near the intersection of Garfield Avenue.[1][14] It was holding a Lunar New Year countdown dance party from 8:00 p.m. to 12:30 a.m.,[15] which was not part of the festival.[13] The Star Ballroom's dance parties, and the studio generally, are popular with older Asian Americans.[16][17]

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Asian Americans in California

Asian Americans in California

Asian Californians are residents of the state of California who are of Asian ancestry. California has the largest Asian American population in the U.S., and second highest proportion of Asian American residents, after Hawaii. As of the 2020 U.S. Census, there were over 6 million Asian-Americans in California; 15.5% of the state's population. If including those with partial Asian ancestry, this figure is around 17%. This is a jump from 13.8% recorded in 2010.

Monterey Park, California

Monterey Park, California

Monterey Park is a city in the western San Gabriel Valley region of Los Angeles County, California, United States, approximately seven miles (11 km) east of the Downtown Los Angeles civic center. It is bordered by Alhambra, Los Angeles, Montebello and Rosemead. The city's motto is "Pride in the past, Faith in the future".

San Gabriel Valley

San Gabriel Valley

The San Gabriel Valley, often referred to by its initials as S.G.V., is one of the principal valleys of Southern California, lying immediately to the east of the eastern city limits of the city of Los Angeles and occupying the vast majority of the eastern part of Los Angeles County, California. Surrounding features include:San Gabriel Mountains on the north, San Rafael Hills to the west, with Los Angeles Basin beyond, Crescenta Valley to the northwest, Puente Hills to the south, with the coastal plain of Orange County beyond, Chino Hills and San Jose Hills to the east, with the Pomona Valley and Inland Empire beyond. The city limits of Los Angeles bordering its western edge.

Los Angeles County, California

Los Angeles County, California

Los Angeles County, officially the County of Los Angeles, and sometimes abbreviated as L.A. County, is the most populous county in both the United States and its state of California, with 9,861,224 residents estimated as of 2022. It is the most populous non–state-level government entity in the United States. Its population is greater than that of 40 individual U.S. states. At 4,083 square miles (10,570 km2) and with 88 incorporated cities and many unincorporated areas, it is home to more than one-quarter of California residents and is one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the United States. Its county seat, Los Angeles, is also California's largest city and the second-most populous city in the United States, with about 3.9 million residents. In recent times, statewide droughts in California have placed great strain on the county’s water security.

Downtown Los Angeles

Downtown Los Angeles

Downtown Los Angeles (DTLA) contains the central business district of Los Angeles. In addition, it contains a diverse residential area of some 85,000 people, and covers 5.84 sq mi (15.1 km2). A 2013 study found that the district is home to over 500,000 jobs. It is also part of Central Los Angeles.

Southern California

Southern California

Southern California is a geographic and cultural region that generally comprises the southern portion of the U.S. state of California. It includes the Los Angeles metropolitan area, the second most populous urban agglomeration in the United States. The region generally contains ten of California's 58 counties: Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties.

Garvey Avenue

Garvey Avenue

Garvey Avenue is a west-east thoroughfare in the San Gabriel Valley. It is named after Richard Garvey Sr., a former postal horse rider and ranch owner who donated part of his land to create the thoroughfare, which became an important link between Los Angeles and the San Gabriel Valley, especially prior to the establishment of the Interstate Highway System.

Garfield Avenue (Los Angeles County)

Garfield Avenue (Los Angeles County)

Garfield Avenue/Cherry Avenue is a major north-south street in Los Angeles County, California, US.

Lunar New Year

Lunar New Year

Lunar New Year is the beginning of a lunar calendar or lunisolar calendar year, whose months are moon cycles. The event is celebrated by numerous cultures in various ways at diverse dates.

Events

Monterey Park shooting

Gunfire was reported at the Star Ballroom Dance Studio at 10:22 p.m. on January 21, 2023.[1][7][14] The gunman fled the scene. Monterey Park police responded within three minutes of the first 9-1-1 call, finding "individuals pouring out of the location screaming" when they arrived.[18] Ten people were pronounced dead at the scene.[6] Ten others were taken to local hospitals.[14][19] The gunman used a Cobray M-11/9,[20][21][22] a semi-automatic pistol variant of the MAC-10 with an extended high-capacity magazine.[23] Robert Luna, the county sheriff, described the weapon as an assault pistol.[11] Luna described the gunman as a male Asian wearing a black leather jacket, a black-and-white beanie, and glasses.[24]

Tran fired 42 rounds in the dance hall.[10] An unnamed witness to the shooting told the media that the gunman began "shooting everybody" in the ballroom, shooting some victims again while walking around.[25][26] The studio's owner and manager, Ming Wei Ma, was reportedly the first to rush the shooter, but was killed.[27] At least one dancer, Yu Kao, was killed shielding others from gunfire.[28] The police took around five hours to alert the public that the shooter was at large, although the information was revealed through police scanners and other government agencies.[29][30]

Alhambra incident

A second incident occurred three miles (4.8 km) away in Alhambra, approximately 17 minutes after the Monterey Park shooting. A gunman entered the Lai Lai Ballroom and Studio on South Garfield Avenue. Brandon Tsay, a 26-year-old computer programmer whose family owns the Lai Lai ballroom, confronted the gunman in the lobby, wrestled the gun away, and chased him out.[31][32] Tsay's actions were lauded as heroic.[31][32]

The gunman fled in a white late-1990s Chevrolet Express 3500 cargo van.[33][34][35][36] He was later identified as the Monterey Park gunman.[36] The suspect was identified by the weapon seized at the Alhambra scene, which gave authorities his name and description.[37]

Gunman's suicide

During the early afternoon of the next day, nearly 22 miles (35 km) away from the second attempted shooting site in Alhambra,[7] police pulled over a van matching the description of the one seen leaving the Alhambra scene at a parking lot in Torrance, near the intersections of Sepulveda and Hawthorne boulevards.[5] The van's license plates appeared to be stolen. As officers approached the van, they heard a single gunshot coming from inside, retreated, and requested tactical units to respond.[38] During the standoff SWAT officers, both visually from their armored vehicles and via a drone-mounted camera, observed the man in the driver's seat slumped over the steering wheel of the van. He died by a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head[2] from a Norinco 7.62×25 mm handgun.[23][21][22]

He was identified as the gunman responsible for both the Monterey Park shooting and the Alhambra incident.[5][39]

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9-1-1

9-1-1

9-1-1, usually written 911, is an emergency telephone number for the United States, Canada, Mexico, Panama, Palau, Argentina, Philippines, Jordan, as well as the North American Numbering Plan (NANP), one of eight N11 codes. Like other emergency numbers around the world, this number is intended for use in emergency circumstances only. Using it for any other purpose is a crime in most jurisdictions.

Cobray Company

Cobray Company

The Cobray Company was an American developer and manufacturer of submachine guns, automatic carbines, handguns, shotguns, and non-lethal 37 mm launchers. These were manufactured by SWD. In the 1970s and 1980s, Cobray was a counter terrorist training center in addition to being an arms maker under the leadership of Mitch WerBell.

Semi-automatic pistol

Semi-automatic pistol

A semi-automatic pistol is a handgun that automatically ejects and loads cartridges in its chamber after every shot fired. Only one round of ammunition is fired each time the trigger is pulled, as the pistol's fire control group disconnects the trigger mechanism from the firing pin/striker until the trigger has been released and reset.

MAC-10

MAC-10

The Military Armament Corporation Model 10, officially abbreviated as "M10" or "M-10", and more commonly known as the MAC-10, is a compact, blowback operated machine pistol/submachine gun that was developed by Gordon B. Ingram in 1964. It is chambered in either .45 ACP or 9mm. A two-stage suppressor by Sionics was designed for the MAC-10, which not only abates the noise created, but makes it easier to control on full automatic.

High-capacity magazine

High-capacity magazine

A high-capacity magazine is a magazine capable of holding more than the usual number of rounds of ammunition for a particular firearm.

Robert Luna

Robert Luna

Robert G. Luna is an American law enforcement officer who is the Sheriff of Los Angeles County, previously serving as Chief of the Long Beach Police Department before defeating Sheriff Alex Villanueva in the 2022 election.

Alhambra, California

Alhambra, California

Alhambra is a city located in the western San Gabriel Valley region of Los Angeles County, California, United States, approximately eight miles from the Downtown Los Angeles civic center. It was incorporated on July 11, 1903. As of the 2020 census, the population was 82,868. The city's ZIP Codes are 91801 and 91803.

Chevrolet Express

Chevrolet Express

The Chevrolet Express is a range of full-size vans from General Motors. The successor of the Chevrolet Van, the model line has been sold as a single generation since the 1996 model year. The Express and Savana are produced in three configurations, including passenger vans, cargo vans, and a cutaway van chassis; the latter vehicle is a chassis cab variant developed for commercial-grade applications, including ambulances, buses, and small trucks.

Torrance, California

Torrance, California

Torrance is a city in the Los Angeles metropolitan area located in Los Angeles County, California, United States. The city is part of what is known as the South Bay region of the metropolitan area. Torrance has 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of beachfront on the Pacific Ocean and a moderate year-round climate with an average rainfall of 12 inches (300 mm) per year. Torrance was incorporated in 1921, and at the 2020 census had a population of 147,067 residents. The city has 30 parks. The city consistently ranks among the safest cities in Los Angeles County. Torrance is also the birthplace of the American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO).

Sepulveda Boulevard

Sepulveda Boulevard

Sepulveda Boulevard is a major street and transportation corridor in the City of Los Angeles and several other cities in western Los Angeles County, California. The street parallels Interstate 405 for much of its route. Portions of Sepulveda Boulevard between Manhattan Beach and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) are designated as part of State Route 1.

SWAT

SWAT

In the United States, a SWAT team is a police tactical unit that uses specialized or military equipment and tactics. Although they were first created in the 1960s to handle riot control or violent confrontations with criminals, the number and usage of SWAT teams increased in the 1980s and 1990s during the War on Drugs and later in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks. In the United States by 2005, SWAT teams were deployed 50,000 times every year, almost 80% of the time to serve search warrants, most often for narcotics. By 2015 that number had increased to nearly 80,000 times a year. SWAT teams are increasingly equipped with military-type hardware and trained to deploy against threats of terrorism, for crowd control, hostage taking, and in situations beyond the capabilities of ordinary law enforcement, sometimes deemed "high-risk".

Norinco

Norinco

China North Industries Group Corporation Limited, doing business internationally as Norinco Group, and known within China as China Ordnance Industries Group Corporation Limited, is a Chinese state-owned defense corporation that manufactures a diverse range of commercial and military products. Norinco Group is one of the world's largest defense contractors.

Victims

Ten people, consisting of five men and five women, were killed at the scene. An eleventh victim, who was female, died at LAC+USC Medical Center the day after the attack.[40][41] Among the victims was Ming Wei Ma, the Star Ballroom Dance Studio's owner and manager.[27][42] Another nine people were injured in the shooting; seven of them remained hospitalized as of January 22, some in critical condition.[38]

The victims were identified as Valentino Marcos Alvero, 68; Hongying Jian, 62; Yu Lun Kao, 72; Lilian Li, 63; Ming Wei Ma, 72; My Nhan, 65; Diana Man Ling Tom, 70; Muoi Dai Ung, 67; Chia Ling Yau, 76; Wen Tau Yu, 64; and Xiujuan Yu, 57.[28][40] Officials from Taiwan confirmed that three of its citizens were among the 11 people killed.[43]

Perpetrator

Huu Can Tran, 72
Huu Can Tran, 72

The gunman was identified as 72-year-old Huu Can Tran.[26][44] A copy of his marriage license indicated he was from China,[45] although an immigration document indicated that he was born in Vietnam.[46] He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1990 or 1991 and settled in the city of San Gabriel.[46][26] In 2013 Tran sold his San Gabriel home, which was a five-minute drive away from the Star Ballroom.[26] In 2020 he bought a double-wide trailer in a senior community at a mobile home park in Hemet,[5][47] a suburb about 85 miles (137 km) east of Los Angeles. He still lived there at the time of the shooting.[18][26]

In the late 1990s, Tran met his wife-to-be at the Star Ballroom Dance Studio, where he gave informal lessons and was a regular patron, and they were married in 2001. Four years later, Tran filed for a divorce, which was approved in 2006.[26] His ex-wife stated that he was never violent while around her but was "quick to anger".[48] According to a friend, Tran claimed the instructors at the dance studio had been saying "evil things" about him. [49]

Tran was arrested for unlawful possession of a firearm in 1990, but he did not have a substantial criminal history.[10] After the shooting, authorities searched Tran's home pursuant to a search warrant.[44][18] Law enforcement found a Savage Arms .308 caliber bolt-action rifle,[44][18][21][22] hundreds of rounds of ammunition,[44][10] and items suggesting that Tran was manufacturing suppressors.[44][10][18]

At 72 years of age, Tran became the second-oldest mass killer in U.S. history behind 73-year-old Carey Hal Dyess who, on June 2, 2011, shot and killed five people including his wife before killing himself near Yuma, Arizona. Otherwise, Tran became the oldest mass killer to fatally shoot people in a public area.[50][51]

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China

China

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia. It is the world's most populous country, with a population exceeding 1.4 billion, slightly ahead of India. China spans the equivalent of five time zones and borders fourteen countries by land, the most of any country in the world, tied with Russia. With an area of approximately 9.6 million square kilometres (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the world's third largest country by total land area. The country consists of 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four municipalities, and two special administrative regions. The national capital is Beijing, and the most populous city and financial center is Shanghai.

Vietnam

Vietnam

Vietnam or Viet Nam, officially the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, is a country in Southeast Asia. It is located at the eastern edge of mainland Southeast Asia, with an area of 311,699 square kilometres (120,348 sq mi) and population of 96 million, making it the world's sixteenth-most populous country. Vietnam borders China to the north, and Laos and Cambodia to the west. It shares maritime borders with Thailand through the Gulf of Thailand, and the Philippines, Indonesia, and Malaysia through the South China Sea. Its capital is Hanoi and its largest city is Ho Chi Minh City.

San Gabriel, California

San Gabriel, California

San Gabriel is a city located in the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles County, California. At the 2010 census, the population was 39,718.

Senior Community Service Employment Program

Senior Community Service Employment Program

The Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) is a program of the United States Department of Labor, its Employment and Training Administration, to help more senior citizens get back into or remain active in the labor workforce. It is a community service and work-based training program. It does this through job skill training and employment assistance with an emphasis on getting a ready job with a suitable and cooperating company or organisation. In such a setting, the worker is paid the United States minimum wage, or the highest of Federal, State or local minimum wage, or the prevailing wage, for an average of 20 hours per week, and experiences on-the-job learning and newly acquired skills use. The intention is that through these community jobs, the older worker will gain a permanent job, not subsidized by federal government funds.

Hemet, California

Hemet, California

Hemet is a city in the San Jacinto Valley in Riverside County, California. It covers a total area of 27.8 square miles (72 km2), about half of the valley, which it shares with the neighboring city of San Jacinto. The population was 89,833 at the 2020 census.

Search warrant

Search warrant

A search warrant is a court order that a magistrate or judge issues to authorize law enforcement officers to conduct a search of a person, location, or vehicle for evidence of a crime and to confiscate any evidence they find. In most countries, a search warrant cannot be issued in aid of civil process.

Savage Arms

Savage Arms

Savage Arms is an American gunmaker based in Westfield, Massachusetts, with operations in Canada. Savage makes a variety of rimfire and centerfire rifles, as well as Stevens single-shot rifles and shotguns. The company is best known for the Model 99 lever-action rifle, no longer in production, and the .300 Savage. Savage was a subsidiary of Vista Outdoor until 2019 when it was spun off.

Silencer (firearms)

Silencer (firearms)

A silencer, also known as a sound suppressor, suppressor, or sound moderator, is a muzzle device that reduces the acoustic intensity of the muzzle report and muzzle rise when a gun is discharged, by modulating the speed and pressure of the propellant gas from the muzzle and hence suppressing the muzzle blast. Like other muzzle devices, a silencer can be a detachable accessory mounted to the muzzle, or an integral part of the barrel.

Yuma, Arizona

Yuma, Arizona

Yuma is a city in and the county seat of Yuma County, Arizona, United States. The city's population was 93,064 at the 2010 census, up from the 2000 census population of 77,515.

Reactions

The makeshift memorial outside Star Ballroom Dance Studio in Monterey Park on January 23, 2023.
The makeshift memorial outside Star Ballroom Dance Studio in Monterey Park on January 23, 2023.

During the manhunt for the gunman, President Joe Biden instructed the Federal Bureau of Investigation to provide full support to the local authorities.[5] He later offered condolences and ordered flags at the White House to be flown at half-staff.[52] Los Angeles Mayor Karen Bass called the shooting "absolutely devastating", and Governor Gavin Newsom said that he was "monitoring the situation closely".[53] In the days after the shooting, Newsom visited Tsay to congratulate him for his heroism,[54] and attended a meeting between the victims in hospital.[55][56]

The second day of Monterey Park's Lunar New Year festival was canceled.[6] Security preparations were stepped up ahead of Lunar New Year celebrations in New York City, Miami, and Los Angeles.[57]

Moments of silence across the country were held at Lunar New Year festivities as well as sporting events involving teams from Los Angeles.[58][59]

It became the deadliest mass shooting in the history of Los Angeles County, exceeding the death toll of a massacre in Covina in 2008.[60][61] The Monterey Park shooting was the second of three mass shootings in California in almost a week, preceded by a house shooting in Goshen and followed by another shooting in Half Moon Bay, killing a total of 24 people.[62][63]

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Joe Biden

Joe Biden

Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. is an American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States. A member of the Democratic Party, he previously served as the 47th vice president from 2009 to 2017 under President Barack Obama, and represented Delaware in the United States Senate from 1973 to 2009.

Federal Bureau of Investigation

Federal Bureau of Investigation

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the domestic intelligence and security service of the United States and its principal federal law enforcement agency. Operating under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Justice, the FBI is also a member of the U.S. Intelligence Community and reports to both the Attorney General and the Director of National Intelligence. A leading U.S. counterterrorism, counterintelligence, and criminal investigative organization, the FBI has jurisdiction over violations of more than 200 categories of federal crimes.

Karen Bass

Karen Bass

Karen Ruth Bass is an American politician, social worker and former physician assistant who is serving as the 43rd mayor of Los Angeles since 2022. A member of the Democratic Party, Bass had previously served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 2011 to 2022, representing California's 33rd congressional district from 2011 to 2013 and California's 37th congressional district from 2013 to 2022. She also served in the California State Assembly from 2004 to 2010 and spent her final term serving as speaker.

Governor of California

Governor of California

The governor of California is the head of government of the U.S. state of California. The governor is the commander-in-chief of the California National Guard and the California State Guard.

Gavin Newsom

Gavin Newsom

Gavin Christopher Newsom is an American politician and businessman who has been the 40th governor of California since 2019. A member of the Democratic Party, he served as the 49th lieutenant governor of California from 2011 to 2019 and the 42nd mayor of San Francisco from 2004 to 2011.

Los Angeles County, California

Los Angeles County, California

Los Angeles County, officially the County of Los Angeles, and sometimes abbreviated as L.A. County, is the most populous county in both the United States and its state of California, with 9,861,224 residents estimated as of 2022. It is the most populous non–state-level government entity in the United States. Its population is greater than that of 40 individual U.S. states. At 4,083 square miles (10,570 km2) and with 88 incorporated cities and many unincorporated areas, it is home to more than one-quarter of California residents and is one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the United States. Its county seat, Los Angeles, is also California's largest city and the second-most populous city in the United States, with about 3.9 million residents. In recent times, statewide droughts in California have placed great strain on the county’s water security.

Covina massacre

Covina massacre

The Covina massacre was a mass murder carried out on Christmas Eve by a disgruntled ex-husband in Los Angeles County, California, United States, in 2008. Bruce Jeffrey Pardo, who was wearing a Santa costume, entered a property belonging to his former in-laws in Covina and killed nine people either by shooting or arson from the fire he started. Three people, including Pardo's ex-wife and his former in-laws, were declared missing pending identification of their bodies. The 45-year-old local resident killed himself with a self-inflicted gunshot to the head at his brother's residence in the early hours of Christmas Day. At the time, the incident was the deadliest mass shooting in Los Angeles County history, being surpassed 14 years later by the 2023 Monterey Park shooting.

Covina, California

Covina, California

Covina is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States, about 22 miles (35 km) east of downtown Los Angeles, in the San Gabriel Valley. The population was 51,268 according to the 2020 census, up from 47,796 at the 2010 census. The city's slogan, "One Mile Square and All There", was coined when the incorporated area of the city was only one square mile (2.6 km2).

Goshen shooting

Goshen shooting

On January 16, 2023, six people, including a ten-month-old baby, were killed execution-style in a house in Goshen, California in the United States by alleged cartel gang members. Three others survived the shooting.

Goshen, California

Goshen, California

Goshen is a census-designated place (CDP) near Visalia, in Tulare County, California, United States. The population was 3,006 at the 2010 census, up from 2,394 at the 2000 census. Until the twentieth century, Goshen was an island in a marsh at the edge of Tulare Lake, formerly the largest freshwater lake west of the Great Lakes until drained.

2023 Half Moon Bay shootings

2023 Half Moon Bay shootings

On January 23, 2023, a shooting spree occurred at two nearby farms in Half Moon Bay, California. Seven people were killed, and an eighth person was critically injured. The suspect was taken into custody after he parked outside the downtown Sheriff's substation. The suspect lived and worked at the first shooting scene, and he previously worked at the second shooting scene.

Half Moon Bay, California

Half Moon Bay, California

Half Moon Bay is a coastal city in San Mateo County, California, United States, approximately 25 miles south of San Francisco. Its population was 11,795 as of the 2020 census. Immediately north of Half Moon Bay is Pillar Point Harbor and the unincorporated community of Princeton-by-the-Sea. Half Moon Bay is known for Mavericks, a big-wave surf location. It is called Half Moon Bay because of its crescent shape.

Source: "2023 Monterey Park shooting", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 29th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2023_Monterey_Park_shooting.

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References
  1. ^ a b c d Gonzales, Ruby; Holshouser, Emily (January 22, 2023). "10 killed in Monterey Park shooting as Lunar New Year is celebrated". Pasadena Star-News. Archived from the original on January 22, 2023. Retrieved January 22, 2023.
  2. ^ a b "Live updates: Suspect in shooting at dance hall near Los Angeles is dead, sheriff says". NBC News. Archived from the original on January 23, 2023. Retrieved January 23, 2023.
  3. ^ White, Jeremy; Lai, K.K. Rebecca (January 26, 2023). "What We Know About the Gun Used in the Monterey Park Shooting". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 27, 2023. Retrieved January 27, 2023.
  4. ^ Haworth, Jon (January 26, 2023). "Monterey Park shooting suspect had no known connection to victims, police say". Retrieved January 27, 2023.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g Winton, Richard; Park, Jeong; Jany, Libor; Lin, Summer; Ellis, Summer (January 22, 2023). "10 people killed, 10 injured in mass shooting at Monterey Park dance studio". The Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 22, 2023. Retrieved January 22, 2023.
  6. ^ a b c Allen, Keith; Burnside, Tina; Yan, Holly (January 22, 2023). "10 people were killed and 10 more are hospitalized in mass shooting in Monterey Park, California". CNN. Archived from the original on January 22, 2023. Retrieved January 22, 2023.
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