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2022 Victorian state election

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2022 Victorian state election

← 2018 26 November 2022[a] 2026 →

All 88 seats in the Victorian Legislative Assembly
All 40 seats in the Victorian Legislative Council
45 Assembly seats are needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Reporting
81.1%
as of 4 December 2022, 12:00 am AEDT (UTC+11)
  First party Second party Third party
  Daniel Andrews 2018.jpg Hon Matthew Guy (cropped).jpg Samantha Ratnam (cropped).jpg
Leader Daniel Andrews Matthew Guy Samantha Ratnam
Party Labor Liberal/National coalition Greens
Leader since 3 December 2010 7 September 2021 12 October 2017
Leader's seat Mulgrave Bulleen MLC for Northern
Metropolitan
Last election 55 seats 27 seats 3 seats
Seats before 55 seats 27 seats 3 seats
Seats won 56 seats 27 seats 4 seats
Seat change Increase 1 Steady Increase1
First preference vote 1,249,731 1,168,734 380,986
Percentage 37.09% 34.69% 11.31%
Swing Decrease5.70% Decrease0.84% Increase0.28%
TPP 54.20% 45.80%
TPP swing Decrease3.40 Increase3.40

2022 Victoria State Election (Assembly).svg
2022 Victoria State Election (Council).svg

Premier before election

Daniel Andrews
Labor

Premier after election

Daniel Andrews
Labor

The 2022 Victorian state election was held on 26 November 2022 to elect the 60th Parliament of Victoria. All 88 seats in the Legislative Assembly (lower house) and all 40 seats in the Legislative Council (upper house) were up for election.

The incumbent Labor government, led by Premier Daniel Andrews won a third successive four-year term, defeating the Liberal/National Coalition, led by Opposition Leader Matthew Guy.[1] The Greens, other minor parties and several independents also contested the election.

Labor has thus far won 53 seats, enough for a eight-seat majority government, while the Coalition have claimed 27. The Greens have increased their representation by one to 4 seats. A further 3 seats remain in doubt according to ABC News. One seat, the Electoral district of Narracan, was deferred to a supplemental election following the death of candidate Shaun Gilchrist days before the election.[2]

On the night of the election, Liberal leader Matthew Guy conceded defeat after it was clear that Labor had won an outright majority of seats. He announced his resignation as party leader the morning after the election.[3]

The election was administered by the Victorian Electoral Commission.

Discover more about 2022 Victorian state election related topics

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

The Australian Labor Party , commonly known as Victorian Labor, is the semi-autonomous Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). The Victorian branch comprises two major wings: the parliamentary wing and the organisational wing. The parliamentary wing comprising all elected party members in the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council, which when they meet collectively constitute the party caucus. The parliamentary leader is elected from and by the caucus, and party factions have a strong influence in the election of the leader. The leader's position is dependent on the continuing support of the caucus and the leader may be deposed by failing to win a vote of confidence of parliamentary members. By convention, the premier sits in the Legislative Assembly, and is the leader of the party controlling a majority in that house. The party leader also typically is a member of the Assembly, though this is not a strict party constitutional requirement.

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Michael Andrews is an Australian politician serving as the 48th and current premier of Victoria since December 2014. He has been the leader of the Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) since December 2010 and a member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) for the division of Mulgrave since 2002.

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia , branded as Liberal Victoria, and commonly known as the Victorian Liberals, is the state division of the Liberal Party of Australia in Victoria. It was formed in 1949 as the Liberal and Country Party (LCP), and simplified its name to the Liberal Party in 1965.

National Party of Australia – Victoria

National Party of Australia – Victoria

The National Party of Australia – Victoria is a political party in Victoria, which forms the state branch of the federal Nationals. Historically, it represented graziers, farmers and rural voters. However, the modern National Party no longer represents these traditional interests; shifting its focus to support the mining industry and as a result, ignoring the challenges faced by rural communities and farmers struggling with the effects of climate change and mining practices such as fracking.

Coalition (Australia)

Coalition (Australia)

The Liberal–National Coalition, commonly known simply as "the Coalition" or informally as the LNP, is an alliance of centre-right political parties that forms one of the two major groupings in Australian federal politics. The two partners in the Coalition are the Liberal Party of Australia and the National Party of Australia. Its main opponent is the Australian Labor Party (ALP); the two forces are often regarded as operating in a two-party system. The Coalition was last in government from the 2013 federal election, before being unsuccessful at re-election in the 2022 Australian federal election. The group is led by Peter Dutton, who succeeded Scott Morrison after the 2022 Australian federal election.

Leader of the Opposition (Victoria)

Leader of the Opposition (Victoria)

The Leader of His Majesty's Opposition in Victoria is the leader of the largest political party in parliament but not in government. They are always a member of the Legislative Assembly. The current Opposition Leader is Peter Griffin, after the resignation of Matthew Guy as the leader of the Liberal Party. He was elected Liberal leader on 29 November 2022, replacing Matthew Guy.

Matthew Guy

Matthew Guy

Matthew Jason Guy is an Australian politician. He has been a Liberal Party of Australia Member of the Parliament of Victoria since 2006, representing Northern Metropolitan Region in the Legislative Council (2006–2014) and Bulleen in the Legislative Assembly (2014–present). He was Leader of the Opposition in Victoria and state leader of the Liberal Party from 2014 to 2018, when he resigned the leadership after the Liberal Party's landslide defeat in the 2018 Victorian election. From 7 September 2021, Guy again served as Leader of the Opposition and Leader of the Liberal Party in Victoria, but he again resigned after the defeat in 2022 Victorian state election.

Australian Greens Victoria

Australian Greens Victoria

The Australian Greens Victoria, commonly known as the Victorian Greens or just as The Greens, is the Victorian state member party of the Australian Greens, a green political party in Australia.

Independent politician

Independent politician

An independent or non-partisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party or bureaucratic association. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent.

Majority government

Majority government

A majority government is a government by one or more governing parties that hold an absolute majority of seats in a legislature. This is as opposed to a minority government, where the largest party in a legislature only has a plurality of seats. A government majority determines the balance of power.

ABC News (Australia)

ABC News (Australia)

ABC News, or ABC News and Current Affairs, is a public news service produced by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Broadcasting within Australia and the rest of the world, the service covers both local and world affairs.

Electoral district of Narracan

Electoral district of Narracan

The electoral district of Narracan is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly in Australia. It was first proclaimed in 1967 and has usually been held by the Liberal Party.

Background

Previous election and parliament

The Daniel Andrews-led Labor government was returned to power after one term in opposition by winning a majority of seats in the Legislative Assembly at the 2014 state election. The Labor party was decisively re-elected at the 2018 state election with a 5.3% two-party preferred swing, winning 55 seats in the Assembly. This was equal to Victorian Labor's second-best seat count ever at a state election. The Liberal/National Coalition dropped to 27 seats, the Greens won 3 seats and independents won the remaining 3 seats. There were no by-elections for the Assembly in the 59th parliament and the Assembly’s composition was otherwise unchanged.

In the Legislative Council, the Labor party won 18 of the 40 seats, the Coalition 11 and the remaining seats were won by an array of minor parties. During the term, two Labor MLC's left the party to sit as independents; (Adem Somyurek in June 2020 and Kaushaliya Vaghela in March 2022) while one Liberal MLC (Bernie Finn) was expelled from the party and joined the Democratic Labour Party in June 2022. This left the government with 16 seats in the Legislative Council, and opposition with 10, by the time of the election.

Daniel Andrews and the Labor government was seeking a third four-year term, something only John Cain Jr and Steve Bracks have previously achieved for Labor. Opposition Leader Matthew Guy stood down as Liberal leader several days after the party's poor result at the 2018 election and was replaced by Michael O'Brien. O'Brien’s leadership was challenged twice in 2021, the second time resulting in O'Brien being replaced by Guy in a party-room vote and Guy returning to the position.[4]

Discover more about Background related topics

Members of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, 2018–2022

Members of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, 2018–2022

This is a list of members of the Victorian Legislative Assembly from 2018 to 2022.

Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 2018–2022

Members of the Victorian Legislative Council, 2018–2022

This is a list of members of the Victorian Legislative Council, as elected at the 2018 state election. It includes members who were appointed to replace members who left office during this period.

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Michael Andrews is an Australian politician serving as the 48th and current premier of Victoria since December 2014. He has been the leader of the Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) since December 2010 and a member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) for the division of Mulgrave since 2002.

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

The Australian Labor Party , commonly known as Victorian Labor, is the semi-autonomous Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). The Victorian branch comprises two major wings: the parliamentary wing and the organisational wing. The parliamentary wing comprising all elected party members in the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council, which when they meet collectively constitute the party caucus. The parliamentary leader is elected from and by the caucus, and party factions have a strong influence in the election of the leader. The leader's position is dependent on the continuing support of the caucus and the leader may be deposed by failing to win a vote of confidence of parliamentary members. By convention, the premier sits in the Legislative Assembly, and is the leader of the party controlling a majority in that house. The party leader also typically is a member of the Assembly, though this is not a strict party constitutional requirement.

2014 Victorian state election

2014 Victorian state election

The 2014 Victorian state election, held on Saturday, 29 November 2014, was for the 58th Parliament of Victoria. All 88 seats in the Victorian Legislative Assembly and 40 seats in the Victorian Legislative Council were up for election. The incumbent centre-right Coalition minority government, led by Liberal Party leader and Premier Denis Napthine and National Party leader and Deputy Premier Peter Ryan, was defeated by the centre-left Labor Party opposition, led by Daniel Andrews. The Greens won two lower house seats, their first Legislative Assembly seats in a Victorian state election, whilst increasing their share of upper house seats. The new Andrews Ministry was sworn in on 4 December 2014.

2018 Victorian state election

2018 Victorian state election

The 2018 Victorian state election was held on Saturday, 24 November 2018 to elect the 59th Parliament of Victoria. All 88 seats in the Legislative Assembly and all 40 seats in the Legislative Council were up for election. The first-term incumbent Labor government, led by Premier Daniel Andrews, won a second four-year term, defeating the Liberal/National Coalition opposition, led by Opposition Leader Matthew Guy in a landslide victory. Minor party the Greens led by Samantha Ratnam also contested the election.

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia , branded as Liberal Victoria, and commonly known as the Victorian Liberals, is the state division of the Liberal Party of Australia in Victoria. It was formed in 1949 as the Liberal and Country Party (LCP), and simplified its name to the Liberal Party in 1965.

Coalition (Australia)

Coalition (Australia)

The Liberal–National Coalition, commonly known simply as "the Coalition" or informally as the LNP, is an alliance of centre-right political parties that forms one of the two major groupings in Australian federal politics. The two partners in the Coalition are the Liberal Party of Australia and the National Party of Australia. Its main opponent is the Australian Labor Party (ALP); the two forces are often regarded as operating in a two-party system. The Coalition was last in government from the 2013 federal election, before being unsuccessful at re-election in the 2022 Australian federal election. The group is led by Peter Dutton, who succeeded Scott Morrison after the 2022 Australian federal election.

Australian Greens Victoria

Australian Greens Victoria

The Australian Greens Victoria, commonly known as the Victorian Greens or just as The Greens, is the Victorian state member party of the Australian Greens, a green political party in Australia.

Independent politician

Independent politician

An independent or non-partisan politician is a politician not affiliated with any political party or bureaucratic association. There are numerous reasons why someone may stand for office as an independent.

By-election

By-election

A by-election, also known as a special election in the United States and the Philippines, a bye-election in Ireland, a bypoll in India, or a Zimni election in Pakistan, is an election used to fill an office that has become vacant between general elections.

Adem Somyurek

Adem Somyurek

Adem Kubilay Somyurek is an Australian politician. He has served as a member of the Victorian Legislative Council representing South Eastern Metropolitan Region since 2002.

Electoral system

Victorian state elections are conducted by the Victorian Electoral Commission (VEC). Though Victoria has compulsory voting, at the 2018 election the voter turnout was just over 90%. Victoria uses instant-runoff voting in single-member seats for the Legislative Assembly, and single transferable vote in multi-member seats for the partially proportionally represented Legislative Council. The Legislative Council presently has 40 members serving four-year terms, elected from eight electoral regions each with five members. With each region electing 5 members, the quota in each region for election, after distribution of preferences, is 16.7% (one-sixth plus 1). Victoria is the only jurisdiction in Australia, at a state or federal level, that retains group voting tickets for the election of its upper house, resulting in preferences of voters voting “above-the-line” being transferred by inter-party agreements. Western Australia, the only other state to employ the system, abolished group voting tickets after the 2021 state election.[5]

Redistribution

New electoral district boundaries, compared to those created in the 2014 redistribution, coloured by party vote in the 2018 state election. Lighter shades indicate a notional change in party hold as a result of redistribution, using electoral pendulum by the VEC.[6]
New electoral district boundaries, compared to those created in the 2014 redistribution, coloured by party vote in the 2018 state election. Lighter shades indicate a notional change in party hold as a result of redistribution, using electoral pendulum by the VEC.[6]

The Electoral Boundaries Commission (EBC) of the Victorian Electoral Commission conducted a redistribution of electoral boundaries as there had been two general elections since the last redistribution. The previous redistribution took place prior to the 2014 election, and the new one was conducted in October 2021. According to commentators, Victoria's "booming population" would see new districts created in outer-suburban and inner-city areas, at the expense of middle-suburban areas.[7] At the 2018 election the voter enrollment in individual districts ranged from 61,814 in Cranbourne[8] to 38,937 in Mount Waverley.[9]

On 30 June 2021, the EBC released draft boundaries for the Victorian Legislative Assembly for the 2022 election. The draft boundaries saw the creation of new electorates and the abolition of current ones. The EBC's final report was released on 28 October 2021.

Changes to electorates of the Legislative Assembly
Electorates abolished Electorates created
Altona Point Cook
Buninyong Eureka
Burwood Ashwood
Ferntree Gully abolished
Forest Hill Glen Waverley
Mount Waverley
Gembrook Berwick
Pakenham
Keysborough abolished
new seat Laverton
Yuroke Greenvale
Kalkallo

Discover more about Electoral system related topics

Compulsory voting

Compulsory voting

Compulsory voting, also called mandatory voting, is the requirement in some countries that eligible citizens register and vote in elections. Penalties might be imposed on those who fail to do so without a valid reason. According to the CIA World Factbook, 21 countries, including 10 Latin American countries, officially had compulsory voting as of December 2021, with a number of those countries not enforcing it. Choosing a party to vote for is not obligatory, as blank votes can be cast, and are counted.

Group voting ticket

Group voting ticket

A group voting ticket (GVT) is a shortcut for voters in a preferential voting system, where a voter can indicate support for a list of candidates instead of marking preferences for individual candidates. For multi-member electoral divisions with single transferable voting, a group or party registers a GVT before an election with the electoral commission. When a voter selects a group or party "above the line" on a ballot paper, their vote is distributed according to the registered GVT for that group.

2021 Western Australian state election

2021 Western Australian state election

The 2021 Western Australian state election was conducted on Saturday 13 March 2021 to elect members to the Parliament of Western Australia, where all 59 seats in the Legislative Assembly and all 36 seats in the Legislative Council were up for election.

Electoral district of Cranbourne

Electoral district of Cranbourne

Cranbourne is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It is located south-east of Melbourne and includes the suburbs of Botanic Ridge, Cranbourne, Cranbourne East, Cranbourne North, Cranbourne West, Junction Village, as well as parts of Clyde, Clyde North, Cranbourne South, Devon Meadows, Lynbrook and Lyndhurst. It was created prior to the 1992 state election.

Electoral district of Mount Waverley

Electoral district of Mount Waverley

The electoral district of Mount Waverley was an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It was located in the south-eastern suburbs of Melbourne and contained the suburbs of Glen Waverley and Mount Waverley.

Electoral district of Altona

Electoral district of Altona

The electoral district of Altona was one of the electoral districts of Victoria, Australia, for the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It covered an area of 79 square kilometres (31 sq mi) in western Melbourne, and included the suburbs of Altona, Altona Meadows, Laverton, Point Cook, Seabrook and Seaholme. It also included the RAAF Williams airbase and the Point Cook Coastal Park. It lay within the Western Metropolitan Region of the upper house, the Legislative Council.

Electoral district of Point Cook

Electoral district of Point Cook

The Electoral district of Point Cook is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly in Australia. It was created in the redistribution of electoral boundaries in 2021, and will come into effect at the 2022 Victorian state election.

Electoral district of Buninyong

Electoral district of Buninyong

The electoral district of Buninyong was an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly in Australia. It was created in the redistribution of electoral boundaries in 2013, and came into effect at the 2014 state election.

Electoral district of Eureka

Electoral district of Eureka

The Electoral district of Eureka is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly in Australia. It was created in the redistribution of electoral boundaries in 2021, and came into effect at the 2022 Victorian state election.

Electoral district of Burwood

Electoral district of Burwood

The electoral district of Burwood was an electorate for the Victorian Legislative Assembly in Australia. It was located approximately 13 kilometres east of Melbourne, and covered an area of 25 km2. The seat included the suburbs of Ashburton, Ashwood, Box Hill South, Burwood, Chadstone, and parts of Camberwell, Canterbury, Glen Iris, and Surrey Hills. It was created in 1955 as part of the expansion of the Legislative Assembly, and abolished in 1967, replaced by Glen Iris. Burwood was recreated in 1976, replacing Glen Iris.

Electoral district of Ashwood

Electoral district of Ashwood

The electoral district of Ashwood is an electorate of the Victorian Legislative Assembly in Melbourne, Australia. It was created in the redistribution of electoral boundaries in 2021, and came into effect at the 2022 Victorian state election.

Electoral district of Ferntree Gully

Electoral district of Ferntree Gully

The electoral district of Ferntree Gully was an electorate of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It was created in 2002 as a replacement for the abolished electorate of Knox.

Results

Legislative Assembly

Legislative Assembly (IRV) – (CV)[10]
Party Votes % Swing Seats Change
  Labor 1,205,421 37.20 −5.70 53 Decrease 2
    Liberal 969,165 29.90 −0.50 18 Decrease 3
  National 159,373 5.0 +0.30 9 Increase 3
Coalition total 1,031,477 34.90 −0.20 27 Steady
  Greens 322,535 10.89 +0.18 4 Increase 1
  Family First 95,476 2.90 +2.90 0 Steady
  Animal Justice 68,238 2.30 +0.48 0 Steady
  Freedom 54,753 1.66 +1.66 0 Steady
  Victorian Socialists 43,026 1.38 +0.94 0 Steady
  Democratic Labour 36,334 1.07 +0.39 0 Steady
  Liberal Democratic 11,346 0.34 +0.23 0 Steady
  Shooters, Fishers and Farmers 10,131 0.30 −0.39 0 Steady
  Reason 9,310 0.30 −0.06 0 Steady
  Pauline Hanson's One Nation 6,937 0.23 +0.23 0 Steady
  Justice 6,678 0.20 −0.06 0 Steady
  Legalise Cannabis 4,791 0.15 +0.15 0 Steady
  New Democrats 4,111 0.12 +0.12 0 Steady
  Angry Victorians 2,717 0.09 +0.09 0 Steady
  Health Australia 594 0.02 +0.02 0 Steady
  Transport Matters 421 0.02 −0.28 0 Steady
  Companions and Pets 454 0.01 +0.01 0 Steady
  Independents 173,078 5.94 −0.13 0 Decrease 3
  In doubt 4
Total valid votes 2,859,298 95.04
Invalid/blank votes 149,324 4.96
Total 3,008,622 100 88 Steady
Registered voters / Turnout 4,394,465 68.46

Results are not final. Last updated on 30 November 2022 at 5:40pm AEDT (UTC+11).

Seats changing hands

Members in italics did not re-contest their Legislative Assembly seats at this election.

Seat Pre-election Swing Post-election
Party Member Margin Margin Member Party
Bayswater Liberal Notional 0.6 3.8 Jackson Taylor Labor
Glen Waverley Liberal Neil Angus 0.9 3.7 John Mullahy Labor
Hastings Liberal Neale Burgess 0.0 –1.0 1.0 Paul Mercurio Labor
Hawthorn Labor John Kennedy 0.6 (v LIB) N/A 0.69 v IND John Pesutto Liberal
Mildura Independent Ali Cupper 0.0 3.9 Jade Benham National
Morwell Labor Notional 4.0 10.6 Martin Cameron National
Nepean Labor Chris Brayne 0.7 7.9 Sam Groth Liberal
Richmond Labor Richard Wynne 5.8 15.1 Gabrielle de Vietri Greens
Shepparton Independent Suzanna Sheed 5.3 10.4 Kim O'Keeffe National

Seats in doubt

Members in italics did not re-contest their Legislative Assembly seats at this election.

Seat Pre-election Swing Leading
Party Member Margin Margin Member Party
Bass Liberal Notional[b] 0.7 -0.8 0.1 Jordan Crugnale Labor
Pakenham Labor Notional 2.2 -2.6 0.3 David Farrelly Liberal
Preston Labor Robin Scott 21.3 (v GRN) -19.0 (v IND) 0.9 (v IND) Nathan Lambert Labor
Narracan Liberal Gary Blackwood 10.0 TBD Deferred[11]

District of Narracan supplementary election

On 21 November, it was reported that the Nationals candidate for the district of Narracan, Shaun Gilchrist, died suddenly. Under electoral law, this means that the lower house election for Narracan has been declared as "failed" by the Victorian Electoral Commission, and a supplementary election will be held for that seat at a later date.[12] The upper house election for that district, (within the Eastern Victoria Region) was held on 26 November.

Legislative Council

Legislative Council (STV/GVT) – (CV)[10][13]
Party Votes % Swing Seats Change
  Labor 736,219 32.67 –6.57 15 Decrease 3
    Liberal (metropolitan) 373,346 16.57 −0.60 8 Increase 1
  Liberal/National joint ticket 322,754 14.32 +2.05
  Liberal (regional) 4 Increase 1
  National 2 Increase 1
Coalition total 696,100 30.89 +1.45 14 Increase 3
  Greens 224,544 9.96 +0.71 4 Increase 3
  Legalise Cannabis 110,010 3.86 +3.86 2 Increase 2
  Democratic Labour 95,724 3.36 +1.17 1 Increase 1
  Liberal Democratic 72,958 2.56 +0.08 0 Decrease 2
  One Nation 58,250 2.05 +2.05 1 Increase 1
  Shooters, Fishers and Farmers 57,987 2.04 −0.86 1 Steady
  Family First 55,076 1.93 +1.93 0 Steady
  Justice 43,364 1.52 –2.50 0 Decrease 3
  Animal Justice 41,317 1.45 –0.95 1 Steady
  Victorian Socialists 37,208 1.31 +0.56 0 Steady
  Reason 35,869 1.26 –0.12 1 Steady
  Freedom 29,654 1.04 +1.04 0 Steady
  Restore Democracy 22,546 0.79 +0.79 0 Steady
  United Australia 22,145 0.78 +0.78 0 Steady
  Health Australia 15,624 0.55 –0.24 0 Steady
  Sustainable Australia 12,811 0.45 –0.37 0 Decrease 1
  Companions and Pets 11,889 0.42 +0.42 0 Steady
  Angry Victorians 11,136 0.39 +0.39 0 Steady
  Transport Matters 7,977 0.28 –0.34 0 Decrease 1
  New Democrats 6,083 0.21 +0.21 0 Steady
  Independents and ungrouped 1,775 0.08 +0.01 0 Steady
Total valid votes 2,253,365 96.50
Invalid/blank votes 81,727 3.50
Total 2,335,092 100 40 Steady
Registered voters / Turnout 4,394,465 53.14

Results are not final. Last updated at 11:10pm on 29 November 2022. Seat totals as noted by the ABC.[14]

Discover more about Results related topics

Instant-runoff voting

Instant-runoff voting

Instant-runoff voting (IRV) is a type of ranked preferential voting method. It uses a majority voting rule in single-winner elections where there are more than two candidates. It is commonly referred to as ranked-choice voting (RCV) in the United States, preferential voting in Australia, where it has seen the widest adoption; in the United Kingdom, it is generally called alternative vote (AV), whereas in some other countries it is referred to as the single transferable vote, which usually means only its multi-winner variant. All these names are often used inconsistently.

Compulsory voting

Compulsory voting

Compulsory voting, also called mandatory voting, is the requirement in some countries that eligible citizens register and vote in elections. Penalties might be imposed on those who fail to do so without a valid reason. According to the CIA World Factbook, 21 countries, including 10 Latin American countries, officially had compulsory voting as of December 2021, with a number of those countries not enforcing it. Choosing a party to vote for is not obligatory, as blank votes can be cast, and are counted.

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

The Australian Labor Party , commonly known as Victorian Labor, is the semi-autonomous Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). The Victorian branch comprises two major wings: the parliamentary wing and the organisational wing. The parliamentary wing comprising all elected party members in the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council, which when they meet collectively constitute the party caucus. The parliamentary leader is elected from and by the caucus, and party factions have a strong influence in the election of the leader. The leader's position is dependent on the continuing support of the caucus and the leader may be deposed by failing to win a vote of confidence of parliamentary members. By convention, the premier sits in the Legislative Assembly, and is the leader of the party controlling a majority in that house. The party leader also typically is a member of the Assembly, though this is not a strict party constitutional requirement.

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia , branded as Liberal Victoria, and commonly known as the Victorian Liberals, is the state division of the Liberal Party of Australia in Victoria. It was formed in 1949 as the Liberal and Country Party (LCP), and simplified its name to the Liberal Party in 1965.

Coalition (Australia)

Coalition (Australia)

The Liberal–National Coalition, commonly known simply as "the Coalition" or informally as the LNP, is an alliance of centre-right political parties that forms one of the two major groupings in Australian federal politics. The two partners in the Coalition are the Liberal Party of Australia and the National Party of Australia. Its main opponent is the Australian Labor Party (ALP); the two forces are often regarded as operating in a two-party system. The Coalition was last in government from the 2013 federal election, before being unsuccessful at re-election in the 2022 Australian federal election. The group is led by Peter Dutton, who succeeded Scott Morrison after the 2022 Australian federal election.

Australian Greens Victoria

Australian Greens Victoria

The Australian Greens Victoria, commonly known as the Victorian Greens or just as The Greens, is the Victorian state member party of the Australian Greens, a green political party in Australia.

Family First Party (2021)

Family First Party (2021)

The Family First Party is an Australian political party based in South Australia, founded on 28 July 2021 by former state Labor ministers Jack Snelling and Tom Kenyon. As of March 2022, Lyle Shelton is the party's National Director.

Animal Justice Party

Animal Justice Party

Animal Justice Party (AJP) is a political party in Australia founded in 2009. The party was registered by the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) on 3 May 2011. The party is also registered in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia, Tasmania, Northern Territory, and the Australian Capital Territory. The AJP is the first political party in Australia formed solely to advance animal welfare issues.

Freedom Party of Victoria

Freedom Party of Victoria

The Freedom Party of Victoria is a minor party registered in the Australian state of Victoria. Founded and registered in 2022, the parties stated vision is: “A state whereby personal freedom is central, government power is limited, the rule of law applies equally to everyone and individual potential is limited only by ones' imagination. This will be delivered by a secure leadership who are focused on serving and governing, not managing and controlling.”

Democratic Labour Party (Australia)

Democratic Labour Party (Australia)

The Democratic Labour Party (DLP), formerly the Democratic Labor Party, is an Australian political party. It broke off from the Australian Labor Party (ALP) as a result of the 1955 ALP split, originally under the name Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist), and was renamed the Democratic Labor Party in 1957. In 1962, the Queensland Labor Party, a breakaway party of the Queensland branch of the Australian Labor Party, became the Queensland branch of the DLP.

Liberal Democratic Party (Australia)

Liberal Democratic Party (Australia)

The Liberal Democratic Party, shortened as LDP, Liberal Democrats, or Lib Dems, is an Australian political party founded in Canberra in 2001. The party espouses smaller government and supports policies that are based on classical liberal, libertarian principles, such as lower taxes, opposing restrictions on civil liberties, decentralisation, utilising nuclear energy, and the relaxation of smoking laws.

Derryn Hinch's Justice Party

Derryn Hinch's Justice Party

Derryn Hinch's Justice Party, also known as the Justice Party, is a political party in Australia, registered for federal elections since 14 April 2016. The party is named after its founder, Derryn Hinch, an Australian media personality.

Date

Pursuant to the Electoral Act 2002, Victoria has fixed terms, with all elections since the 2006 election held every four years on the last Saturday of November. This means that the date for the election was set for 26 November 2022. This could change only if Parliament had been dissolved unexpectedly beforehand.[15][16]

Electoral pendulum

The state underwent a periodic review of its electoral boundaries which was completed in October 2021.[17]

In August 2022, the Victorian Electoral Commission published a report with its own estimates of the results on the new electoral boundary margins.[6] In September 2022, Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) election analyst Antony Green released the seat classifications and new electoral pendulum used by the ABC, which are listed below.[18]

Pre-election pendulum

Members in italics did not contest the election as a candidate for the seat they held or its replacement. However, some members did contest a different seat to the one they held or its replacement, or contested the Legislative Council. Will Fowles, the Member for Burwood which has been replaced by Ashwood, contested instead Ringwood. Brad Battin, the Member for Gembrook which has been replaced by Pakenham, instead contestested Berwick. Sarah Connolly, the Member for Tarneit, contested Laverton. Lizzie Blandthorn, the Member for Pascoe Vale, will contested in the Legislative Council for the Western Metropolitan Region.

Labor seats (56)
Seat Member Party Margin
Marginal
Hawthorn John Kennedy ALP 0.6%
Nepean Chris Brayne ALP 0.7%
Northcote Kat Theophanous ALP 1.7% v GRN
Ashwood Will Fowles ALP 2.0%
Pakenham Brad Battin (Lib) ALP 2.2%
Ripon Louise Staley (Lib) ALP 2.8%
South Barwon Darren Cheeseman ALP 3.0%
Box Hill Paul Hamer ALP 3.1%
Ringwood Dustin Halse ALP 3.2%
Morwell Russell Northe (IND) ALP 4.0%
Melton Steve McGhie ALP 5.0%
Richmond Richard Wynne ALP 5.8% v GRN
Fairly safe
Monbulk James Merlino ALP 7.1%
Eltham Vicki Ward ALP 8.8%
Werribee Tim Pallas ALP 9.1% v IND
Cranbourne Pauline Richards ALP 9.3%
Eureka Michaela Settle ALP 9.6%
Safe
Frankston Paul Edbrooke ALP 10.2%
Geelong Christine Couzens ALP 10.3%
Narre Warren South Gary Maas ALP 10.4%
Narre Warren North Luke Donnellan ALP 10.4%
Wendouree Juliana Addison ALP 11.0%
Bellarine Lisa Neville ALP 11.4%
Bentleigh Nick Staikos ALP 11.4%
Carrum Sonya Kilkenny ALP 12.0%
Bendigo East Jacinta Allan ALP 12.1%
Ivanhoe Anthony Carbines ALP 12.3%
Niddrie Ben Carroll ALP 12.5%
Point Cook Jill Hennessy ALP 12.8%
Albert Park Martin Foley ALP 13.1%
Macedon Mary-Anne Thomas ALP 13.4%
Mordialloc Tim Richardson ALP 13.4%
Sunbury Josh Bull ALP 14.5%
Clarinda Meng Heang Tak ALP 14.9%
Mulgrave Daniel Andrews ALP 15.8%
Essendon Danny Pearson ALP 15.8%
Oakleigh Steve Dimopoulos ALP 16.0%
Bundoora Colin Brooks ALP 16.2%
Yan Yean Danielle Green ALP 16.9%
Tarneit Sarah Connolly ALP 17.9%
Sydenham Natalie Hutchins ALP 18.3%
Bendigo West Maree Edwards ALP 18.6%
Lara John Eren ALP 19.1%
Williamstown Melissa Horne ALP 19.9%
Very safe
Kalkallo Ros Spence ALP 20.9%
Preston Robin Scott ALP 21.3% v GRN
St Albans Natalie Suleyman ALP 22.0%
Greenvale New seat ALP 22.0%
Pascoe Vale Lizzie Blandthorn ALP 22.3%
Dandenong Gabrielle Williams ALP 23.1%
Laverton New seat ALP 23.4%
Mill Park Lily D'Ambrosio ALP 24.9%
Broadmeadows Frank McGuire ALP 25.2%
Kororoit Marlene Kairouz ALP 25.3%
Thomastown Bronwyn Halfpenny ALP 27.4%
Footscray Katie Hall ALP 27.6%
Liberal/National seats (27)
Seat Member Party Margin
Marginal
Hastings Neale Burgess LIB 0.00%
Caulfield David Southwick LIB 0.04%
Sandringham Brad Rowswell LIB 0.4%
Brighton James Newbury LIB 0.5%
Bayswater Jackson Taylor (ALP) LIB 0.6%
Bass Jordan Crugnale (ALP) LIB 0.7%
Glen Waverley Neil Angus LIB 0.9%
Croydon David Hodgett LIB 1.0%
Eildon Cindy McLeish LIB 1.0%
Berwick New seat LIB 1.3%
Evelyn Bridget Vallence LIB 1.8%
Polwarth Richard Riordan LIB 2.0%
Benambra Bill Tilley LIB 2.6% v IND
South-West Coast Roma Britnell LIB 3.2%
Warrandyte Ryan Smith LIB 3.8%
Kew Tim Smith LIB 4.7%
Mornington David Morris LIB 5.0%
Rowville Kim Wells LIB 5.5%
Bulleen Matthew Guy LIB 5.5%
Fairly safe
Malvern Michael O'Brien LIB 6.0%
Safe
Narracan Gary Blackwood LIB 10.0%
Ovens Valley Tim McCurdy NAT 12.1%
Gippsland South Danny O'Brien NAT 14.2%
Euroa Steph Ryan NAT 15.8%
Gippsland East Tim Bull NAT 17.6%
Very safe
Lowan Emma Kealy NAT 21.1%
Murray Plains Peter Walsh NAT 24.0%
Crossbench seats (5)
Seat Member Party Margin
Mildura Ali Cupper IND 0.00% v NAT
Melbourne Ellen Sandell GRN 1.7% v ALP
Brunswick Tim Read GRN 2.0% v ALP
Shepparton Suzanna Sheed IND 5.3% v LIB
Prahran Sam Hibbins GRN 8.2% v LIB

Post-election pendulum

Labor seats (57)
Seat Member Party Margin
Marginal
Bass Jordan Crugnale ALP 0.3%
Preston Nathan Lambert ALP 0.9% v IND
Hastings Paul Mercurio ALP 0.9%
Northcote Kat Theophanous ALP 1.2% v GRN
Ripon Martha Haylett ALP 2.3%
Glen Waverley John Mullahy ALP 2.7%
Pascoe Vale Anthony Cianflone ALP 2.8% v GRN
Yan Yean Lauren Kathage ALP 4.0%
Bayswater Jackson Taylor ALP 4.1%
Melton Steve McGhie ALP 4.2%
Footscray Katie Hall ALP 4.4% v GRN
Fairly safe
Eureka Michaela Settle ALP 6.0%
Ashwood Matt Fregon ALP 6.3%
Sunbury Josh Bull ALP 6.6%
Box Hill Paul Hamer ALP 6.8%
Greenvale Iwan Walters ALP 7.0%
Niddrie Ben Carroll ALP 7.4%
Mordialloc Tim Richardson ALP 7.5%
Bentleigh Nick Staikos ALP 8.0%
Narre Warren South Gary Maas ALP 8.3%
Frankston Paul Edbrooke ALP 8.4%
Monbulk Daniela De Martino ALP 8.4%
Ringwood Will Fowles ALP 8.4%
Sydenham Natalie Hutchins ALP 8.4%
Bellarine Alison Marchant ALP 8.5%
Point Cook Mathew Hilakari ALP 8.8%
Cranbourne Pauline Richards ALP 8.9%
Macedon Mary-Anne Thomas ALP 9.3%
Narre Warren North Belinda Wilson ALP 9.4%
Eltham Vicki Ward ALP 9.6%
South Barwon Darren Cheeseman ALP 9.7%
St Albans Natalie Suleyman ALP 9.8%
Werribee Tim Pallas ALP 9.8%
Bendigo East Jacinta Allan ALP 9.9%
Safe
Carrum Sonya Kilkenny ALP 10.2%
Mulgrave Daniel Andrews ALP 10.4%
Mill Park Lily D'Ambrosio ALP 10.8%
Clarinda Meng Heang Tak ALP 11.2%
Albert Park Nina Taylor ALP 11.5%
Tarneit Dylan Wight ALP 12.3%
Williamstown Melissa Horne ALP 12.5%
Bundoora Colin Brooks ALP 12.6%
Ivanhoe Anthony Carbines ALP 12.9%
Oakleigh Steve Dimopoulos ALP 13.4%
Wendouree Juliana Addison ALP 13.7%
Kororoit Luba Grigorovitch ALP 14.7%
Geelong Christine Couzens ALP 15.0%
Bendigo West Maree Edwards ALP 15.4%
Essendon Danny Pearson ALP 15.4%
Broadmeadows Kathleen Matthews-Ward ALP 16.2%
Thomastown Bronwyn Halfpenny ALP 16.6%
Lara Ella George ALP 16.7%
Kalkallo Ros Spence ALP 16.9%
Laverton Sarah Connolly ALP 18.1%
Dandenong Gabrielle Williams ALP 19.7%
Liberal/National seats (26)
Seat Member Party Margin
Marginal
Pakenham David Farrelly LIB 0.0%
Mornington Chris Crewther LIB 0.5% v IND
Benambra Bill Tilley LIB 1.1% v IND
Hawthorn John Pesutto LIB 1.2% v IND
Mildura Jade Benham NAT 1.3% v IND
Croydon David Hodgett LIB 1.5%
Polwarth Richard Riordan LIB 2.6%
Caulfield David Southwick LIB 2.9%
Rowville Kim Wells LIB 4.2%
Warrandyte Ryan Smith LIB 4.4%
Morwell Martin Cameron NAT 5.1%
Shepparton Kim O'Keeffe NAT 5.2% v IND
Sandringham Brad Rowswell LIB 5.9%
Fairly safe
Evelyn Bridget Vallence LIB 6.0%
Berwick Brad Battin LIB 6.3%
Nepean Sam Groth LIB 6.3%
Brighton James Newbury LIB 6.8%
Bulleen Matthew Guy LIB 7.1%
Eildon Cindy McLeish LIB 7.7%
South-West Coast Roma Britnell LIB 8.2%
Safe
Euroa Annabelle Cleeland NAT 11.9%
Gippsland South Danny O'Brien NAT 16.7%
Ovens Valley Tim McCurdy NAT 18.7%
Very safe
Lowan Emma Kealy NAT 22.6%
Murray Plains Peter Walsh NAT 23.7%
Gippsland East Tim Bull NAT 24.2%
Crossbench seats (4)
Seat Member Party Margin
Richmond Gabrielle de Vietri GRN 7.0% v ALP
Melbourne Ellen Sandell GRN 10.4% v ALP
Prahran Sam Hibbins GRN 13.1% v LIB
Brunswick Tim Read GRN 13.2% v ALP
Deferred (1)
Seat Member Party Margin
Narracan Gary Blackwood LIB 10.0%

Discover more about Electoral pendulum related topics

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

The Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) is the national broadcaster of Australia. It is principally funded by direct grants from the Australian Government and is administered by a government-appointed board. The ABC is a publicly-owned body that is politically independent and fully accountable, with its charter enshrined in legislation, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation Act 1983. ABC Commercial, a profit-making division of the corporation, also helps to generate funding for content provision.

Antony Green

Antony Green

Antony John Green is an Australian psephologist and commentator. He is the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's election analyst.

Electoral district of Hawthorn

Electoral district of Hawthorn

The electoral district of Hawthorn is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It was first proclaimed in 1888 taking effect at the 1889 elections.

Electoral district of Nepean

Electoral district of Nepean

The electoral district of Nepean is an electorate of the Victorian Legislative Assembly covering the southernmost part of the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, Australia. It is named after Point Nepean which is contained within the electorate.

Chris Brayne

Chris Brayne

Chris Jon Brayne is an Australian politician. He has been a Labor Party member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly since November 2018, representing the seat of Nepean.

Electoral district of Northcote

Electoral district of Northcote

The electoral district of Northcote is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It covers the suburbs of Alphington, Fairfield, Northcote, Thornbury, and part of Preston. It lies on the northern bank of the Yarra River between the Merri and Darebin creeks.

Electoral district of Ashwood

Electoral district of Ashwood

The electoral district of Ashwood is an electorate of the Victorian Legislative Assembly in Melbourne, Australia. It was created in the redistribution of electoral boundaries in 2021, and came into effect at the 2022 Victorian state election.

Electoral district of Pakenham

Electoral district of Pakenham

Electoral district of Pakenham is an electoral district of the Legislative Assembly in the Australian state of Victoria. It was recreated in the redistribution of electoral boundaries in 2021, and will be re-contested at the 2022 Victorian state election.

Brad Battin

Brad Battin

Bradley William Battin is an Australian politician who currently serves as the Liberal Party member for Berwick in the Victorian Legislative Assembly since 2022. he was previously the member for Gembrook from 2010 until the seat was abolished in 2022 following the 2021 Redistribution. He was formerly a police officer and owned a bakery in Wheelers Hill.

Darren Cheeseman

Darren Cheeseman

Darren Leicester Cheeseman is an Australian politician. He has been a Labor Party member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly since November 2018, representing the seat of South Barwon. He previously held the federal seat of Corangamite from 2007 to 2013.

Electoral district of Box Hill

Electoral district of Box Hill

The electoral district of Box Hill is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, covering an area of 29 square kilometres (11 sq mi) in eastern Melbourne. It contains the suburbs of Box Hill, Box Hill North, Box Hill South, Mont Albert, Mont Albert North, most of Blackburn, Blackburn North, and Blackburn South, and parts of Balwyn North, Burwood, Burwood East, and Surrey Hills.

Electoral district of Ringwood (Victoria)

Electoral district of Ringwood (Victoria)

The electoral district of Ringwood is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, located in the east of Melbourne. It was first proclaimed in 1958 and was abolished in 1992. Some of Ringwood was included in the new electoral district of Bayswater that year. Kay Setches, the last member for Ringwood, contested and lost Bayswater at the 1992 election.

Registered parties

As of 31 October 2022, there are 23 parties registered with the Victorian Electoral Commission (VEC):[19]

A further 5 applications to register were rejected by the VEC by parties that failed to meet the statutory threshold of 500 registered members: the Australian Democrats,[23] Australian Federation, Fusion, Independence and Indigenous-Aboriginal parties. The application for one party, Family Matters Australia, remains pending.[24]

In addition, three parties sought to register but later withdrew. Family First Victoria, unrelated to the party of the same name that contested the 2022 South Australian state election, announced it would withdraw its registration on 12 August.[25] On 13 August, the Victorians Party―which had been formally registered by the VEC and had announced a series of candidates―announced it would not contest the election and was later deregistered by the VEC.[26] On 29 September, the Legalise Marijuana Party confirmed it would withdraw after its application was challenged by the Legalise Cannabis party.[27]

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Animal Justice Party

Animal Justice Party

Animal Justice Party (AJP) is a political party in Australia founded in 2009. The party was registered by the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) on 3 May 2011. The party is also registered in New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia, Tasmania, Northern Territory, and the Australian Capital Territory. The AJP is the first political party in Australia formed solely to advance animal welfare issues.

Australian Values Party

Australian Values Party

The Australian Values Party is a minor political party founded on 19 January 2022 by ADF veteran Heston Russell. The party's main focus is veterans' rights, although it has policy positions on other subjects as well.

Australian Greens Victoria

Australian Greens Victoria

The Australian Greens Victoria, commonly known as the Victorian Greens or just as The Greens, is the Victorian state member party of the Australian Greens, a green political party in Australia.

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

Australian Labor Party (Victorian Branch)

The Australian Labor Party , commonly known as Victorian Labor, is the semi-autonomous Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP). The Victorian branch comprises two major wings: the parliamentary wing and the organisational wing. The parliamentary wing comprising all elected party members in the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council, which when they meet collectively constitute the party caucus. The parliamentary leader is elected from and by the caucus, and party factions have a strong influence in the election of the leader. The leader's position is dependent on the continuing support of the caucus and the leader may be deposed by failing to win a vote of confidence of parliamentary members. By convention, the premier sits in the Legislative Assembly, and is the leader of the party controlling a majority in that house. The party leader also typically is a member of the Assembly, though this is not a strict party constitutional requirement.

Democratic Labour Party (Australia)

Democratic Labour Party (Australia)

The Democratic Labour Party (DLP), formerly the Democratic Labor Party, is an Australian political party. It broke off from the Australian Labor Party (ALP) as a result of the 1955 ALP split, originally under the name Australian Labor Party (Anti-Communist), and was renamed the Democratic Labor Party in 1957. In 1962, the Queensland Labor Party, a breakaway party of the Queensland branch of the Australian Labor Party, became the Queensland branch of the DLP.

Derryn Hinch's Justice Party

Derryn Hinch's Justice Party

Derryn Hinch's Justice Party, also known as the Justice Party, is a political party in Australia, registered for federal elections since 14 April 2016. The party is named after its founder, Derryn Hinch, an Australian media personality.

Family First Party (2021)

Family First Party (2021)

The Family First Party is an Australian political party based in South Australia, founded on 28 July 2021 by former state Labor ministers Jack Snelling and Tom Kenyon. As of March 2022, Lyle Shelton is the party's National Director.

Freedom Party of Victoria

Freedom Party of Victoria

The Freedom Party of Victoria is a minor party registered in the Australian state of Victoria. Founded and registered in 2022, the parties stated vision is: “A state whereby personal freedom is central, government power is limited, the rule of law applies equally to everyone and individual potential is limited only by ones' imagination. This will be delivered by a secure leadership who are focused on serving and governing, not managing and controlling.”

Health Australia Party

Health Australia Party

The Health Australia Party (HAP) is a political party in Australia, founded in 2013 as the Natural Medicine Party. It adopted its current name in 2015.

Legalise Cannabis Australia

Legalise Cannabis Australia

Legalise Cannabis Australia, formerly the Help End Marijuana Prohibition (HEMP) Party, is an Australian political party. It has a number of policies that centre around the re-legalisation of cannabis for personal, medicinal and industrial uses in Australia.

Liberal Democratic Party (Australia)

Liberal Democratic Party (Australia)

The Liberal Democratic Party, shortened as LDP, Liberal Democrats, or Lib Dems, is an Australian political party founded in Canberra in 2001. The party espouses smaller government and supports policies that are based on classical liberal, libertarian principles, such as lower taxes, opposing restrictions on civil liberties, decentralisation, utilising nuclear energy, and the relaxation of smoking laws.

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

Liberal Party of Australia (Victorian Division)

The Liberal Party of Australia , branded as Liberal Victoria, and commonly known as the Victorian Liberals, is the state division of the Liberal Party of Australia in Victoria. It was formed in 1949 as the Liberal and Country Party (LCP), and simplified its name to the Liberal Party in 1965.

Candidates and retiring MPs

The following members have announced they are not contesting the 2022 election:

A record 740 candidates will contest the 88 Legislative Assembly seats at the Victorian election on 26 November, well up on the previous record of 543 candidates in 2014 and the 507 in 2018. The 454 candidates for the Legislative Council is the highest number of upper house candidates in a Victorian election, up from 380 in 2018.[28]

Labor

Liberal

National

Independent

Discover more about Candidates and retiring MPs related topics

Candidates of the 2022 Victorian state election

Candidates of the 2022 Victorian state election

This is a list of the candidates of the 2022 Victorian state election.

Electoral district of Narre Warren North

Electoral district of Narre Warren North

The electoral district of Narre Warren North is an electorate of the Victorian Legislative Assembly and includes the suburbs of Hallam, Narre Warren, Narre Warren North and parts of Berwick, Endeavour Hills and Harkaway.

Electoral district of Lara

Electoral district of Lara

Lara is a seat in the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It covers much of the area between the western suburbs of Melbourne and the regional city of Geelong. Most of the voters come from the very northern suburbs of Geelong, including Lara, Bell Post Hill and Corio. The district also includes the country towns of Anakie, Balliang and Little River but these add very few voters to the district.

Electoral district of Albert Park

Electoral district of Albert Park

The electoral district of Albert Park is one of the electoral districts of Victoria, Australia, for the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It covers an area of 21 square kilometres (8.1 sq mi) in inner suburban Melbourne, and includes the suburbs of Albert Park, Middle Park, Port Melbourne, St Kilda West, Southbank, South Melbourne, South Wharf, and parts of St Kilda. It lies within the Southern Metropolitan Region of the upper house, the Legislative Council.

Danielle Green

Danielle Green

Danielle Louise Green is an Australian politician, currently serving as the member for Yan Yean in the Victorian Legislative Assembly. She represents the Labor Party

Electoral district of Yan Yean

Electoral district of Yan Yean

The electoral district of Yan Yean is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It is located on the fringes of Melbourne's northern suburbs and contains the towns of Hurstbridge, Plenty, Whittlesea and Yan Yean.

Dustin Halse

Dustin Halse

Dustin Raffaele Halse is an Australian politician. He has been a Labor Party member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly since November 2018, representing the seat of Ringwood. On 24 November 2021, Halse shared publicly that he would not be recontesting his seat in the 2022 Victorian state election.

Electoral district of Ringwood (Victoria)

Electoral district of Ringwood (Victoria)

The electoral district of Ringwood is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly, located in the east of Melbourne. It was first proclaimed in 1958 and was abolished in 1992. Some of Ringwood was included in the new electoral district of Bayswater that year. Kay Setches, the last member for Ringwood, contested and lost Bayswater at the 1992 election.

Electoral district of Altona

Electoral district of Altona

The electoral district of Altona was one of the electoral districts of Victoria, Australia, for the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It covered an area of 79 square kilometres (31 sq mi) in western Melbourne, and included the suburbs of Altona, Altona Meadows, Laverton, Point Cook, Seabrook and Seaholme. It also included the RAAF Williams airbase and the Point Cook Coastal Park. It lay within the Western Metropolitan Region of the upper house, the Legislative Council.

Electoral district of Kororoit

Electoral district of Kororoit

The electoral district of Kororoit is an electorate of the Victorian Legislative Assembly covering Albanvale, Caroline Springs as well as some parts of Deer Park and St Albans in the western suburbs of Melbourne.

Electoral district of Monbulk

Electoral district of Monbulk

The electoral district of Monbulk is an electoral district of the Victorian Legislative Assembly. It is situated in the Dandenong Ranges on the outskirts of Melbourne. It includes the towns of Monbulk, Olinda and Silvan as well as some outer suburbs such as Belgrave and Tecoma.

Frank McGuire (politician)

Frank McGuire (politician)

Frank McGuire is an Australian politician representing the Victorian Legislative Assembly seat of Broadmeadows for the Labor Party since the 2011 Broadmeadows by-election. McGuire was a journalist, political adviser, and business consultant prior to entering politics.

Campaign and controversies

In the lead-up to the state election, Labor Premier Daniel Andrews committed to reviving the State Electricity Commission if re-elected.[49][50][51] The government would have a 51% shareholding in the new State Electricity Commission.[52] Andrews committed to amending the state’s constitution to protect public ownership of the revived State Electricity Commission if re-elected, to make it harder, although not impossible, for it to be privatised again in the future.[53][54] Re-privatising the commission after such legislation would require a "special majority" of 60% of both the Legislative Assembly and Legislative Council,[55] a situation which already exists for any potential privitisation of water services in Victoria under the Constitution of Victoria.[56]

Matthew Guy and the Liberal Party began their election campaign on 2 November with a press conference that saw Guy unveil their "Ditch Dan" vehicle, a 1970s era ambulance emblazoned with anti-Andrews slogans & graphics. The vehicle having the "Ambulance" designation above the drivers area caused the head of the Victorian Ambulance Union, Danny Hill, to question the legality of the vehicle as the state’s Ambulance Services Act makes it an offence to use the word “ambulance” on any vehicle that is not owned or operated by an ambulance service without written authority of the Department of Health. The ambulance was used to tie into Guy's promised regarding the building of new hospitals and recruiting 40,000 new medical staff. [57] Guy also promised to axe stamp duty for first home buyers on properties up to $1 million for 12 months.

On 8 November, Guy defended his party advertising attacking Dan Andrews for being a "prick", and the use of footage from antivax protests in Melbourne where protestors urinated on the Shrine of Remembrance and attacked police.[58][59]

On 10 November, Guy downplayed his deputy David Southwick using two staffers employed by Southwick as actors in campaign ads without disclosing they are members of his campaign staff. When Guy was asked if the use of paid staffers in campaign ads was misleading, Guy replied by endorsing Southwick and stating that "it was not misleading" regardless of the lack of a disclaimer.[60][61]

On 16 November, Australian Values Party leader Heston Russell leaked a video to the Herald Sun of him to talking to Glenn Druery about a potential preference deal, declaring that the AVP felt the co-ordination of the group voting ticket system used by Druery was immoral and needed to be exposed.[62] This led to calls for the abolition of the group voting ticket, which Matthew Guy has said he would support and asked Andrews to commit to scrapping it, regardless of the election result. Andrews said he would wait until after the previously scheduled electoral reform review, due after the election, before making any changes.[63]

On 17 November, the Victorian Electoral Commission announced that it had referred Guy and his former chief of staff to the Independent Broad-based Anti-corruption Commission after it had exhausted attempts to investigate an alleged violation of political donation disclosure laws.[64] The investigation followed a leak of documents showing a proposed contract requiring a Liberal donor to pay a total of $125,000 to the chief of staff's private marketing firm, potentially in breach of the $4,210 limit on donations from individuals or organisations.[65] In a statement outlining the referral, the Victorian electoral commissioner stressed that the VEC had not "received full co-operation from those connected to its investigation". However, Guy denied allegations of wrongdoing and insisted that he had provided material to the VEC.[66] The following day, the Liberals accused the VEC of deliberate electoral interference and an "intent to damage the Liberal Party in the State Election" in a cease and desist letter by the party's lawyers.[67]

On 19 November, the Liberal Party dumped Renee Heath, the first ranked candidate for the Liberal ticket in the Eastern Victoria Region of the upper house Victorian Legislative Council, from the party after her conservative religious views, including support for Conversion therapy, were bought to light by a newspaper investigation. The decision came too late for Heath to be disendorsed by the party, and her position on the ticket makes it an effective certainty that she will win a position in Parliament. Questions were raised over how much Guy and the Liberal Party knew of her views, and the accusations of Entryism made regarding Heath and her family by Liberal party member Cathrine Burnett-Wake in her final address to Parliament after Heath defeated her for pre-selection.[68][69]

Also on 19 November, Australian Values candidate and state MP Catherine Cumming declared at an anti-lockdown rally that she wished for Premier of Victoria Daniel Andrews to be turned into a "red mist". These comments were denounced by both Andrews and leader of the Victorian opposition Matthew Guy, and led to the Victoria Police opening an investigation into Cumming for alleged promotion of violence.[70][71]

Narre Warren North Liberal candidate Timothy Dragan had some controversies relating to Aboriginal recognition, climate change, abortion and a fellow Liberal candidate in a neighbouring seat.[72]

Richmond Labor candidate Lauren O'Dwyer had some controversies relating to her Aboriginal heritage claim disputed by some.[73]

On 21 November, Daniel Andrews claimed that there were neo-Nazi candidates running in the election.[74]

The only state leaders debate between Andrews and Guy was held on 22 November on Sky News Australia and Sky News Regional. Andrews was declared the winner, with 38% of the vote.[75]

Labor accused a 'Greens-dominated' Darebin council of removing Labor billboards in the seat of Northcote.[76][77]

Discover more about Campaign and controversies related topics

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Michael Andrews is an Australian politician serving as the 48th and current premier of Victoria since December 2014. He has been the leader of the Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) since December 2010 and a member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) for the division of Mulgrave since 2002.

State Electricity Commission of Victoria

State Electricity Commission of Victoria

The State Electricity Commission of Victoria is a government-owned electricity supplier in Victoria, Australia. It was set up in 1918, and by 1972 it was the sole agency in the state for electricity generation, transmission, distribution and supply. Control of the SECV was by a Board of Commissioners appointed by the Victorian Government. After 1993, the SECV was disaggregated into generation, transmission and distribution companies, which were further split and then privatised in the mid to late 1990s. However, electricity supply agreements with the Portland and Point Henry aluminium smelters were retained by SECV, which continued as their electricity supplier.

Constitution of Victoria

Constitution of Victoria

The Constitution of Victoria is the constitution of the state of Victoria, Australia. The current constitution, the Constitution Act 1975 was enacted in 1975, and has been amended several times.

Privatization

Privatization

Privatization can mean several different things, most commonly referring to moving something from the public sector into the private sector. It is also sometimes used as a synonym for deregulation when a heavily regulated private company or industry becomes less regulated. Government functions and services may also be privatised ; in this case, private entities are tasked with the implementation of government programs or performance of government services that had previously been the purview of state-run agencies. Some examples include revenue collection, law enforcement, water supply, and prison management.

Matthew Guy

Matthew Guy

Matthew Jason Guy is an Australian politician. He has been a Liberal Party of Australia Member of the Parliament of Victoria since 2006, representing Northern Metropolitan Region in the Legislative Council (2006–2014) and Bulleen in the Legislative Assembly (2014–present). He was Leader of the Opposition in Victoria and state leader of the Liberal Party from 2014 to 2018, when he resigned the leadership after the Liberal Party's landslide defeat in the 2018 Victorian election. From 7 September 2021, Guy again served as Leader of the Opposition and Leader of the Liberal Party in Victoria, but he again resigned after the defeat in 2022 Victorian state election.

Prick (slang)

Prick (slang)

Prick is a vulgar word for penis as well as a pejorative term used to refer to a despicable or contemptible individual. It is generally considered offensive, though in the past it has been used as a term of endearment. Its history as a euphemism for penis goes back to the 1500s and has been used in wordplay by Shakespeare and other writers who have combined the vulgarism with the standard meaning of the noun, which means the act of piercing or puncturing. Most linguists believe it has only been used as a direct insult since 1929.

COVID-19 protests in Australia

COVID-19 protests in Australia

Protests over responses to the COVID-19 pandemic have occurred around the world. There have been several protests against lockdowns and other restrictions introduced by the Commonwealth and state governments in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia since 2020. Some joining protests have also been against vaccinations, while others have also subscribed to various conspiracy theories or misinformation about COVID-19. Protests have been held in several state capitals, with most occurring in including Sydney and Melbourne. While some protests were peaceful, others ended in clashes between protesters and police. Australian police have issued fines against protesters for breaching lockdown restrictions.

Shrine of Remembrance

Shrine of Remembrance

The Shrine of Remembrance is a war memorial in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, located in Kings Domain on St Kilda Road. It was built to honour the men and women of Victoria who served in World War I, but now functions as a memorial to all Australians who have served in any war. It is a site of annual observances for Anzac Day and Remembrance Day, and is one of the largest war memorials in Australia.

David Southwick

David Southwick

David James Southwick is a Liberal Australian politician, and has been the member for Caulfield in the Victorian Legislative Assembly since 2010. Southwick has been the Parliamentary Secretary for Police and Emergency Services and is currently Shadow Minister for Jobs and Employment, Shadow Minister for Events Industry, Shadow Minister for Business Recovery, Shadow Minister for CBD Recovery, Shadow Minister for Small Business and Shadow Minister for Business Precincts. As of 7 September 2021, Southwick is the Deputy Leader of the Liberal Party in Victoria.

Australian Values Party

Australian Values Party

The Australian Values Party is a minor political party founded on 19 January 2022 by ADF veteran Heston Russell. The party's main focus is veterans' rights, although it has policy positions on other subjects as well.

Heston Russell

Heston Russell

Heston Russell is an Australian retired Special Forces major. He founded and is the leader of the Australian Values Party.

Herald Sun

Herald Sun

The Herald Sun is a conservative daily tabloid newspaper based in Melbourne, Australia, published by The Herald and Weekly Times, a subsidiary of News Corp Australia, itself a subsidiary of the Murdoch owned News Corp. The Herald Sun primarily serves Melbourne and the state of Victoria and shares many articles with other News Corporation daily newspapers, especially those from Australia.

Polling

Graphical summary

Primary vote (2022)
Two-party-preferred
Preferred Premier
Andrews approval rating
Opposition Leaders approval rating

Voting intention

Legislative Assembly (lower house) polling
Date Firm Primary vote TPP vote
ALP LIB NAT GRN OTH ALP L/NP
21 – 24 November 2022 Newspoll[78] 38% 35%* 12% 15% 54.5% 45.5%
22 – 23 November 2022 Roy Morgan[79] 38% 32.5%* 12.5% 17%[c] 55% 45%
16 – 21 November 2022 Resolve Strategic[80][d] 36.2% 35.8%* 10.1% 17.9% 52.7% 47.3%
9 – 10 November 2022 Roy Morgan[81] 40% 25.5% 3.5% 11.5% 19.5%[e] 57% 43%
3 – 6 November 2022 Freshwater Strategy[82] 37% 34%* 14% 15% 56% 44%
31 October – 6 November 2022 RedBridge[83] 38% 38%* 14% 11% 53.5% 46.5%
28 October – 6 November 2022 Lonergan Research [84] 42% 29%* 19% 11%
31 October – 3 November 2022 Newspoll[85] 37% 37%* 13% 13% 54% 46%
23 October 2022 Resolve Strategic[86][f] 38% 31%* 12% 18%
18 October 2022 Roy Morgan[87] 42% 26% 2% 14.5% 15.5%[g] 60.5% 39.5%
18 September 2022 Resolve Strategic[88][f] 42% 28%* 12% 18%
11 – 13 September 2022 Roy Morgan[89] 36.5% 29.5%* 14% 20.5%[h] 58% 42%
31 August – 7 September 2022 Essential[90] 35.3% 32.2%* 10.2% 56%[91] 44%[91]
22 – 25 August 2022 Newspoll[92] 41% 36%* 13% 10% 56% 44%
11 – 13 August 2022 Roy Morgan[93] 40.5% 27.5%* 14% 18%[i] 60.5% 39.5%
30 June – 2 July 2022 Roy Morgan[94] 43.5% 29.5% 2.5% 12% 15%[j] 59.5% 40.5%
3 April 2022 Resolve Strategic[95][f] 37% 33%* 10% 19%
15 January 2022 Resolve Strategic[96][f] 41% 31%* 11% 17%
24 November 2021 Roy Morgan[97] 45% 27% 2% 10.5% 15.5%[k] 59.5% 40.5%
11–17 November 2021 Newspoll[98] 44% 36%* 11% 9% 58% 42%
12 November 2021 Roy Morgan[99] 43% 28% 3% 11% 15%[l] 58% 42%
24 October 2021 Resolve Strategic[100][f] 38% 34%* 10% 18%
7 September 2021 Matthew Guy becomes Liberal leader and leader of the opposition
22 August 2021 Resolve Strategic[101][f] 40% 35%* 10% 15%
12–15 June 2021 RedBridge[102][103] 37% 38% 3% 12% 10% 52.4% 47.6%
13 June 2021 Resolve Strategic[104][f] 37% 36%* 9% 17%
9–10 November 2020 Roy Morgan[105] 45% 30.5% 4% 11% 9.5% 58.5% 41.5%
29 October – 4 November 2020 YouGov[106] 44% 40%* 11% 5% 55% 45%
12–13 October 2020 Roy Morgan[107] 40% 36% 4% 9% 6% 51.5% 48.5%
28–29 September 2020 Roy Morgan[108] 39% 37% 2.5% 10% 6% 51.5% 48.5%
15–17 September 2020 Roy Morgan[109] 37% 35% 3.5% 12% 8.5% 51.5% 48.5%
6 December 2018 Michael O'Brien becomes Liberal leader and leader of the opposition
24 November 2018 election 42.9% 30.4% 4.8% 10.7% 11.2% 57.3% 42.7%
23 November 2018 Newspoll[110] 41% 40%* 11% 8% 53.5% 46.5%
* Indicates a combined Liberal/National primary vote.
Newspoll polling is published in The Australian.[111]

Preferred Premier and satisfaction

Better Premier and satisfaction polling*
Date Firm Better Premier Andrews Guy
Andrews Guy Satisfied Dissatisfied Satisfied Dissatisfied
21 – 24 November 2022 Newspoll[78] 51% 35% 46% 48% 31% 56%
16 – 21 November 2022 Resolve Strategic[80] 48% 34% N/A
9–10 November 2022 Roy Morgan[93] 65.5% 34.5% 58.5% 41.5% N/A
3–6 November 2022 Freshwater Strategic[82] 40% 28% 39% 48% 32% 48%
31 October – 3 November 2022 Newspoll[85] 52% 33% 51% 44% 32% 52%
28 October 2022 Resolve Strategic[86] 49% 29% N/A
18 September 2022 Resolve Strategic[88] 46% 28% N/A
22–25 August 2022 Newspoll[92] 51% 34% 54% 41% 32% 49%
11–13 August 2022 Roy Morgan[93] 66% 34% 62.5% 37.5% N/A
30 June – 2 July 2022 Roy Morgan[94] 64.5% 35.5% 63.5% 36.5% N/A
3 April 2022 Resolve Strategic[95] 48% 31% N/A
15 January 2022 Resolve Strategic[96] 47% 30% N/A
24 November 2021 Roy Morgan[97] N/A 63.5% 36.5% N/A
17 November 2021 Newspoll[98] 54% 33% 56% 42% 34% 42%
11 November 2021 Roy Morgan[99] N/A 60.5% 39.5% N/A
24 October 2021 Resolve Strategic[100] 45% 32% N/A
20–24 October 2021 Essential[112] not asked 52% 40% not asked
15–18 September 2021 Newspoll[113] not asked 64% 35% not asked
7 September 2021 Guy replaces O'Brien Andrews O'Brien Andrews O'Brien
22 August 2021 Resolve Strategic[101] 50% 24% N/A
12–15 June 2021 RedBridge[102][103] 42.4% 23.1% 49.7% 46.5% 36.1% 44%
13 June 2021 Resolve Strategic[104] 49% 23% 42% 32% 14% 22%
11–16 November 2020 Essential[114] not asked 65% 28% not asked
9–10 November 2020 Roy Morgan[105] not asked 71% 29% not asked
29 October – 4 November 2020 YouGov[106] not asked 65% 32% 26% 53%
28 October – 2 November 2020 Essential[115] not asked 61% 33% not asked
19–21 October 2020 Ipsos[116] 53% 18% 52% 33% 15% 39%
14–19 October 2020 Essential[117] not asked 54% 40% not asked
12–13 October 2020 Roy Morgan[107] not asked 59% 41% not asked
29–30 September 2020 Roy Morgan[108] not asked 61% 39% not asked
16–19 September 2020 Newspoll[118] not asked 62% 35% not asked
8–9 September 2020 Roy Morgan[119] not asked 70% 30% not asked
15–18 July 2020 Newspoll[120] not asked 57% 37% not asked
24–28 June 2020 Newspoll[121] not asked 67% 27% not asked
21–26 April 2020 Newspoll[122] not asked 75% 17% not asked
6 December 2018 O'Brien replaces Guy Andrews Guy Andrews Guy
24 November 2018 election
24–28 October 2018 Newspoll[123] 45% 29% 45% 40% 31% 46%
22–24 October 2018 YouGov not asked 44% 35% 24% 42%
7 October 2018 ReachTEL[124] 51.3% 48.7% not asked
11–13 September 2018 YouGov[125] not asked 40% 42% 25% 44%
* Remainder were "uncommitted" or "other/neither".
† Participants were forced to choose.
Newspoll polling is published in The Australian.[111]

Discover more about Polling related topics

Two-party-preferred vote

Two-party-preferred vote

In Australian politics, the two-party-preferred vote is the result of an election or opinion poll after preferences have been distributed to the highest two candidates, who in some cases can be independents. For the purposes of TPP, the Liberal/National Coalition is usually considered a single party, with Labor being the other major party. Typically the TPP is expressed as the percentages of votes attracted by each of the two major parties, e.g. "Coalition 50%, Labor 50%", where the values include both primary votes and preferences. The TPP is an indicator of how much swing has been attained/is required to change the result, taking into consideration preferences, which may have a significant effect on the result.

2018 Victorian state election

2018 Victorian state election

The 2018 Victorian state election was held on Saturday, 24 November 2018 to elect the 59th Parliament of Victoria. All 88 seats in the Legislative Assembly and all 40 seats in the Legislative Council were up for election. The first-term incumbent Labor government, led by Premier Daniel Andrews, won a second four-year term, defeating the Liberal/National Coalition opposition, led by Opposition Leader Matthew Guy in a landslide victory. Minor party the Greens led by Samantha Ratnam also contested the election.

Newspoll

Newspoll

Newspoll is an Australian opinion polling brand, published by The Australian and administered by international market research and data analytics group, YouGov. Newspoll has a long tradition of predicting Australian Federal Election results, both federal and state.

The Australian

The Australian

The Australian, with its Saturday edition, The Weekend Australian, is a broadsheet newspaper published by News Corp Australia since 14 July 1964. As the only Australian daily newspaper distributed nationally, its readership as of September 2019 of both print and online editions was 2,394,000. Its editorial line has been self-described over time as centre-right.

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Andrews

Daniel Michael Andrews is an Australian politician serving as the 48th and current premier of Victoria since December 2014. He has been the leader of the Victorian branch of the Australian Labor Party (ALP) since December 2010 and a member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) for the division of Mulgrave since 2002.

Matthew Guy

Matthew Guy

Matthew Jason Guy is an Australian politician. He has been a Liberal Party of Australia Member of the Parliament of Victoria since 2006, representing Northern Metropolitan Region in the Legislative Council (2006–2014) and Bulleen in the Legislative Assembly (2014–present). He was Leader of the Opposition in Victoria and state leader of the Liberal Party from 2014 to 2018, when he resigned the leadership after the Liberal Party's landslide defeat in the 2018 Victorian election. From 7 September 2021, Guy again served as Leader of the Opposition and Leader of the Liberal Party in Victoria, but he again resigned after the defeat in 2022 Victorian state election.

Michael O'Brien (Victorian politician)

Michael O'Brien (Victorian politician)

Michael Anthony O'Brien is an Australian politician. He has been a Liberal Party member of the Victorian Legislative Assembly since 2006, representing the electorate of Malvern and served as the leader of the party and opposition leader from December 2018 to September 2021.

Newspaper endorsements

Prior to the election, several newspapers around the country have published editorials endorsing the party they believe should win. News Corp's Melbourne tabloid the Herald Sun, and its Sunday edition the Sunday Herald Sun endorsed the Coalition. News Corp's national masthead The Australian would also give an endorsement to the Coalition. The company has been accused by several other media outlets of biased coverage against the Labor Party and Premier Daniel Andrews, with former Australian prime minister Kevin Rudd dismissing their electoral coverage as "dog-whistling to conspiracy theorists".[126][127]

Nine Entertainment's national masthead the Australian Financial Review endorsed the Coalition, while Nine's Melbourne-based The Age endorsed Labor. Although the paper conceded that Andrews had become "arrogant", his party offered the better plan for the state.

Weekend editions

Newspaper Owner Endorsement
Sunday Herald-Sun News Corp Coalition[128]
The Sunday Age Nine Entertainment No Endorsement given

Metropolitan dailies

Newspaper Owner Endorsement
The Age Nine Entertainment Labor[129]
The Australian News Corp Coalition[130]
Australian Financial Review Nine Entertainment Coalition[131]
Herald Sun News Corp Coalition[132]

Online publications

Newspaper Owner Endorsement
Guardian Australia Guardian Media Group No Endorsement given
Green Left Weekly Green Left Weekly No Endorsement given

Discover more about Newspaper endorsements related topics

News Corp Australia

News Corp Australia

News Corp Australia is one of Australia's largest media conglomerates, employing more than 8,000 staff nationwide and approximately 3,000 journalists. The group's interests span newspaper and magazine publishing, Internet, subscription television, market research, DVD and film distribution, and film and television production trading assets. News Pty Limited is the holding company of the group.

Herald Sun

Herald Sun

The Herald Sun is a conservative daily tabloid newspaper based in Melbourne, Australia, published by The Herald and Weekly Times, a subsidiary of News Corp Australia, itself a subsidiary of the Murdoch owned News Corp. The Herald Sun primarily serves Melbourne and the state of Victoria and shares many articles with other News Corporation daily newspapers, especially those from Australia.

The Australian

The Australian

The Australian, with its Saturday edition, The Weekend Australian, is a broadsheet newspaper published by News Corp Australia since 14 July 1964. As the only Australian daily newspaper distributed nationally, its readership as of September 2019 of both print and online editions was 2,394,000. Its editorial line has been self-described over time as centre-right.

Kevin Rudd

Kevin Rudd

Kevin Michael Rudd is an Australian former politician and diplomat who served as the 26th prime minister of Australia from 2007 to 2010 and again from June 2013 to September 2013. He held office as the leader of the Australian Labor Party.

Dog whistle (politics)

Dog whistle (politics)

In politics, a dog whistle is the use of coded or suggestive language in political messaging to garner support from a particular group without provoking opposition. The concept is named after ultrasonic dog whistles, which are audible to dogs but not humans. Dog whistles use language that appears normal to the majority but communicates specific things to intended audiences. They are generally used to convey messages on issues likely to provoke controversy without attracting negative attention.

Nine Entertainment

Nine Entertainment

Nine Entertainment is an Australian publicly listed media company with holdings in radio and television broadcasting, newspaper publications and digital media. It uses Nine as its corporate branding and also prefers this usage to be used for the parent company.

Australian Financial Review

Australian Financial Review

The Australian Financial Review is an Australian business-focused, compact daily newspaper covering the current business and economic affairs of Australia and the world. The newspaper is based in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; owned by Nine Entertainment and has been published continuously since its founding in 1951. The AFR, along with the rest of Fairfax Media, was sold to Nine Entertainment for more than A$2.3 billion. The AFR is published in tabloid format six times a week, whilst providing 24/7 online coverage through its website. In November 2019, the AFR reached 2.647 million Australians through both print and digital mediums (Mumbrella).

The Age

The Age

The Age is a daily newspaper in Melbourne, Australia, that has been published since 1854. Owned and published by Nine Entertainment, The Age primarily serves Victoria, but copies also sell in Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory and border regions of South Australia and southern New South Wales. It is delivered both in print and digital formats. The newspaper shares some articles with its sister newspaper The Sydney Morning Herald.

Guardian Australia

Guardian Australia

Guardian Australia is the Australian website of the British global online and print newspaper, The Guardian.

Guardian Media Group

Guardian Media Group

Guardian Media Group plc (GMG) is a British-based mass media company owning various media operations including The Guardian and The Observer. The group is wholly owned by the Scott Trust Limited, which exists to secure the financial and editorial independence of The Guardian in perpetuity.

Green Left (Australian newspaper)

Green Left (Australian newspaper)

Green Left, previously known as Green Left Weekly, is an Australian socialist newspaper, written by progressive activists to "present the views excluded by the big business media". The newspaper was founded in 1990. Green Left is the de facto newspaper of the Socialist Alliance.

Source: "2022 Victorian state election", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, December 3rd), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2022_Victorian_state_election.

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Notes
  1. ^ The election in the seat of Narracan has been deferred to a later date.
  2. ^ Jordan Crugnale was elected as the MP for Bass at the 2018 Victorian state election for the Australian Labor Party. However, redistribution by the Victorian Electoral Commission has resulted in the district notionally Liberal.
  3. ^ UAP 0.5%, Justice 1%, "teal independents" 4.5%, Other parties 11.0%
  4. ^ TPP calculated from respondent nominated preferences and results to one decimal place provided pre-election by Resolve Strategic
  5. ^ UAP 0.5%, Justice 1%, "teal independents" 4.5%, Other parties 13.5%
  6. ^ a b c d e f g TPP vote not calculated
  7. ^ One Nation 2%, UAP 1%, Liberal Democrats 1%, AJP 1%, SFF 0.5%, Justice 0.5%, Legalise Cannabis Australia 0.5%, "teal independents" 1%, other Independent 7%, Other parties 1%
  8. ^ One Nation 2%, Liberal Democrats 1.5%, AJP 1%, Justice 0.5%, SFF 0.5%, UAP 0.5%, Legalise Cannabis Australia 0.5%, Independent 6.5%, Other 7.5%
  9. ^ UAP 2%, Justice 1.5%, "teal independents" 5%, Other 9.5%
  10. ^ UAP 2%, Justice 1%, "teal independents" 3%, Other 9%
  11. ^ UAP 4%, Justice 2%, Other 9.5%
  12. ^ UAP 3%, Justice 2%, Other 10%
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