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2022 Moscow rally

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For a world without Nazism
Native name «Zа мир без нацизма»
English name"For a world without Nazism"
Date18 March 2022 (2022-03-18)
VenueLuzhniki Stadium
LocationMoscow, Russia
Coordinates55°42′56″N 37°33′13″E / 55.71556°N 37.55361°E / 55.71556; 37.55361Coordinates: 55°42′56″N 37°33′13″E / 55.71556°N 37.55361°E / 55.71556; 37.55361
TypePolitical rally and concert
Organised byVladimir Putin
Participants200,000+ (according to police)

The 2022 Moscow rally, officially known in Russia as "For a world without Nazism" (Russian: «Zа мир без нацизма»), was a political rally and concert at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow on 18 March 2022, which marked the eighth anniversary of the annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation. President Vladimir Putin spoke at the event, justifying the Russian invasion of Ukraine and praising Russian troops,[1] to a crowd of 200,000 people, per Moscow City Police.[2] Outlets including the BBC and the Moscow Times reported that state employees were transported to the venue, and other attendees were paid or forced to attend.[3]

Discover more about 2022 Moscow rally related topics

Russian language

Russian language

Russian Russian [ˈruskʲɪj jɪˈzɨk] is an East Slavic language mainly spoken across Russia. It is the native language of the Russians, and belongs to the Indo-European language family. It is one of four living East Slavic languages, and is also a part of the larger Balto-Slavic languages. Besides Russia itself, Russian is an official language in Belarus, Kazakhstan, and Kyrgyzstan, and is used widely as a lingua franca throughout Ukraine, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and to some extent in the Baltic states. It was the de facto language of the former Soviet Union, and continues to be used in public life with varying proficiency in all of the post-Soviet states.

Concert

Concert

A concert is a live music performance in front of an audience. The performance may be by a single musician, sometimes then called a recital, or by a musical ensemble, such as an orchestra, choir, or band. Concerts are held in a wide variety and size of settings, from private houses and small nightclubs, dedicated concert halls, amphitheatres and parks, to large multipurpose buildings, such as arenas and stadiums. Indoor concerts held in the largest venues are sometimes called arena concerts or amphitheatre concerts. Informal names for a concert include show and gig.

Luzhniki Stadium

Luzhniki Stadium

Luzhniki Stadium is the national stadium of Russia, located in its capital city, Moscow. The full name of the stadium is Grand Sports Arena of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex. Its total seating capacity of 81,000 makes it the largest football stadium in Russia and the ninth-largest stadium in Europe. The stadium is a part of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex, and is located in Khamovniki District of the Central Administrative Okrug of Moscow city. The name Luzhniki derives from the flood meadows in the bend of Moskva River where the stadium was built, translating roughly as "The Meadows". The stadium is located at Luzhniki Street, 24, Moscow.

Moscow

Moscow

Moscow is the capital and largest city of Russia. The city stands on the Moskva River in Central Russia, with a population estimated at 13.0 million residents within the city limits, over 17 million residents in the urban area, and over 20 million residents in the metropolitan area. The city covers an area of 2,511 square kilometers (970 sq mi), while the urban area covers 5,891 square kilometers (2,275 sq mi), and the metropolitan area covers over 26,000 square kilometers (10,000 sq mi). Moscow is among the world's largest cities; being the most populous city entirely in Europe, the largest urban and metropolitan area in Europe, and the largest city by land area on the European continent.

Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation

Annexation of Crimea by the Russian Federation

In February and March 2014, Russia invaded and subsequently annexed the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine. This event took place in the aftermath of the Revolution of Dignity and is part of the wider Russo-Ukrainian War.

Vladimir Putin

Vladimir Putin

Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin is a Russian politician and former intelligence officer who has served as the president of Russia since 2012, having previously served between 2000 and 2008. He was the prime minister of Russia from 1999 to 2000 and again from 2008 to 2012, thus having served continuously as either president or prime minister from 1999 onwards.

2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine

2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine

On 24 February 2022, Russia invaded Ukraine in a major escalation of the Russo-Ukrainian War, which began in 2014. The invasion has likely resulted in tens of thousands of deaths on both sides and caused Europe's largest refugee crisis since World War II, with an estimated 8 million people being displaced within the country by late May as well as 7.8 million Ukrainians fleeing the country as of 8 November 2022. Within five weeks of the invasion, Russia experienced its greatest emigration since the 1917 October Revolution. The invasion has also caused global food shortages.

Moscow City Police

Moscow City Police

The Moscow Police, officially the Main Directorate of Internal Affairs of the City of Moscow, is the police force for Moscow, Russia.

BBC

BBC

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national broadcaster of the United Kingdom, based at Broadcasting House in London, England. It is the world's oldest national broadcaster, and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees, employing over 22,000 staff in total, of whom approximately 19,000 are in public-sector broadcasting.

Event

The arena and stage featured slogans reading "For a world without Nazism",[a] "For our president",[b] and "For Russia",[c] but featuring the Latin Z character in place of the usual Cyrillic З.[4] Some signs also featured Saint George's ribbon-styled Z's with the hashtag #СвоихНеБросаем,[5] meaning "we don't abandon our own".[6]

Luzhniki Stadium hosted the event
Luzhniki Stadium hosted the event

The rally's content, described by Agence France-Presse as "heavily anti-Western and filled with Soviet nostalgia," emphasized patriotism, heroism, and support for the military.[7] Polina Gagarina, who represented Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2015, performed her cover of "Kukushka" from the 2015 film Battle for Sevastopol.[8] Russian band Lyube played patriotic songs about wartime,[9][10] Oleg Gazmanov performed the song "Born in the U.S.S.R.",[d][12][13] and Fyodor Tyutchev's May 1867 poem "Напрасный труд — нет, их не вразумишь..."[e][16] was read by Russian actor Vladimir Mashkov.[4] Other speakers at the event included RT editor-in-chief Margarita Simonyan, who said, "This is for our boys who are fighting scum right now";[17] Moscow mayor Sergey Sobyanin, who thanked "the guys who with weapons in their hands defend Russian citizens in the Donbas ... Half the world has united against us, but Russia is a strong country";[18] and Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesperson Maria Zakharova, who called Russia "a country and nation that safeguards peace and fights evil".[17][19] Many of the speakers wore Z-shaped Saint George's ribbons,[3] which also appeared on signs in the crowd.[17]

Numerous Russian Olympic athletes were featured during the rally, including several who had recently returned from the 2022 Beijing Olympics. The Russian national anthem was played while they were on stage, a reference to the anthem being banned at the previous three Olympics due to state-sponsored doping.[20] Athletes in attendance included cross-country skier Alexander Bolshunov; figure skaters Nikita Katsalapov, Vladimir Morozov, Victoria Sinitsina, and Evgenia Tarasova; rhythmic gymnasts Dina Averina and Arina Averina; and swimmer Evgeny Rylov.[20] Russian gymnast Ivan Kuliak, who was undergoing International Gymnastics Federation disciplinary proceedings for wearing a "Z" sticker at the 2022 Doha World Cup, wore an Olympic medal at the rally, though he had not competed in any Olympics.[21]

The rally marked Russian President Vladimir Putin's first public appearance since the start of the invasion of Ukraine.[2] In his speech, which he opened by quoting the Constitution of Russia, Putin congratulated the "people of Crimea and Sevastopol" and wished them a "happy anniversary" of the annexation of Crimea. He went on to discuss those areas' finances and infrastructure, claiming that instead of Ukraine's "leftover financing" provided, Russia "needed to drag Crimea out of that humiliating position". Putin further alleged a "genocide" by Ukraine against the people of Donbas, before quoting the Bible's "no greater love" passage from John 15. Finally, Putin noted that Fyodor Ushakov's birthday was 24 February, the same date that the invasion of Ukraine was launched in 2022.[22] Part of his televised speech on Russia-24 was interrupted by a technical problem.[23][24]

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Hashtag

Hashtag

A hashtag is a metadata tag that is prefaced by the hash sign, #. On social media, hashtags are used on microblogging and photo-sharing services such as Twitter or Instagram as a form of user-generated tagging that enables cross-referencing of content by topic or theme. For example, a search within Instagram for the hashtag #bluesky returns all posts that have been tagged with that term. After the initial hash symbol, a hashtag may include letters, numerals, or underscores.

Luzhniki Stadium

Luzhniki Stadium

Luzhniki Stadium is the national stadium of Russia, located in its capital city, Moscow. The full name of the stadium is Grand Sports Arena of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex. Its total seating capacity of 81,000 makes it the largest football stadium in Russia and the ninth-largest stadium in Europe. The stadium is a part of the Luzhniki Olympic Complex, and is located in Khamovniki District of the Central Administrative Okrug of Moscow city. The name Luzhniki derives from the flood meadows in the bend of Moskva River where the stadium was built, translating roughly as "The Meadows". The stadium is located at Luzhniki Street, 24, Moscow.

Agence France-Presse

Agence France-Presse

Agence France-Presse (AFP) is a French international news agency headquartered in Paris, France. Founded in 1835 as Havas, it is the world's oldest news agency.

Polina Gagarina

Polina Gagarina

Polina Sergeyevna Gagarina is a Russian singer and songwriter. She represented Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2015 with "A Million Voices" where she finished second with 303 points. In doing so, she became the first second placed finisher to exceed 300 points. Gagarina also participated in the Chinese reality-competition Singer in 2019, where she was one of the finalists.

Eurovision Song Contest 2015

Eurovision Song Contest 2015

The Eurovision Song Contest 2015 was the 60th edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Vienna, Austria, following the country's victory at the 2014 contest with the song "Rise Like a Phoenix" by Conchita Wurst. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF), the contest was held at the Hall D of the Wiener Stadthalle and consisted of two semi-finals on 19 and 21 May, and a final on 23 May 2015. The three live shows were presented by Austrian television presenters Mirjam Weichselbraun, Alice Tumler and Arabella Kiesbauer, while the previous edition's winner Conchita Wurst acted as the green room host.

Battle for Sevastopol

Battle for Sevastopol

Battle for Sevastopol is a 2015 biographical war film about Lyudmila Pavlichenko, a young Soviet woman who joined the Red Army to fight the German invasion of the USSR and became one of the deadliest snipers in World War II. The film, a joint Russian-Ukrainian production, was released in both countries on 2 April 2015, and its international premiere took place two weeks later at the Beijing International Film Festival.

Lyube

Lyube

Lyube is a Russian rock band from Lyubertsy, a city in Moscow Oblast. Lyube's music is a mixture of several genres, with influences from both Russian folk music, rock, Russian chanson, and Soviet military songs. The band was founded in 1989, and since then have released sixteen albums. Lyube's producer and main songwriter is Igor Matviyenko.

Oleg Gazmanov

Oleg Gazmanov

Oleg Mikhaylovich Gazmanov is a Soviet and Russian singer, composer and poet, specializing in patriotic and nationalist songs, as well as songs which cover more conventional pop themes. Gazmanov is leader of pop group "Эскадрон" (Squadron). His songs have been covered by others in the Russian chanson style, such as Mikhail Shufutinsky. He is also a Candidate for Master of Sport of the USSR in gymnastics and is well known for his acrobatics performed during live shows, especially at the beginning of his musical career in the early 1990s.

Fyodor Tyutchev

Fyodor Tyutchev

Fyodor Ivanovich Tyutchev was a Russian poet and diplomat.

RT (TV network)

RT (TV network)

RT is a Russian state-controlled international news television network funded by the Russian government. It operates pay television and free-to-air channels directed to audiences outside of Russia, as well as providing Internet content in Russian, English, Spanish, French, German and Arabic.

Margarita Simonyan

Margarita Simonyan

Margarita Simonovna Simonyan is a Russian journalist. She is the editor-in-chief of the Russian state-controlled propaganda media organisations RT and Rossiya Segodnya. In 2022, Simonyan was sanctioned by the European Union as "a central figure of the Russian Government propaganda" responsible for "actions and policies which undermine the territorial integrity, sovereignty and independence of Ukraine".

Maria Zakharova

Maria Zakharova

Maria Vladimirovna Zakharova is the Director of the Information and Press Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation since 2015.

Reaction

Ukrainian president Volodymyr Zelenskyy, in a video message released on 19 March, mentioned the rally:[25]

Many words were heard in Moscow today in connection with the anniversary of the seizure of Crimea. A big rally took place. And I want to pay attention to one detail. It is reported that a total of about 200,000 people were involved in the rally in the Russian capital. 100,000 on the streets, about 95,000 at the stadium. Approximately the same number of Russian troops were involved in the invasion of Ukraine. Just imagine 14,000 corpses and tens of thousands of wounded and maimed people at that stadium in Moscow. There are already so many Russian losses as a result of this invasion. This is the price of war. In a little more than three weeks. The war must end.[25]

Putin's remarks made references to Bible passages and Russian military history, which was seen as reflecting a broader pattern of the leader using religion and history to help form a Russian nationalist identity.[26] Conservative U.S. political commentator Sean Hannity, a supporter of former U.S. president Donald Trump, said that the rally appeared to be used by Putin for "channeling his inner Donald Trump," while the liberal HuffPost described the rally as "terrifying" and "ominous" and said that Putin was "in full dictator mode."[27][28] Putin also received criticism for wearing what appeared to be a US$13,000 Loro Piana parka.[3]

The athletes were criticized in media outside of Russia for their participation in the rally.[20][29][30][31] The Times described the athletes as "being paraded ... at the Luzhniki Stadium as the Russian president's warm-up act" at a "pro-war propaganda rally."[32] Photographs posted to social media by some athletes blurred the "Z" symbols they had worn, which was interpreted as recognition of the war's lack of popularity amongst younger Russians.[29] While some analysts believed athletes who wore the symbol could have been forced to participate, Washington Post sports columnist Sally Jenkins contended that for the figure skaters in particular, "there's no extricating individual Russian skaters from [their participation], no matter how blameless some of them may be or how subject to coercion or censorship."[33][34]

Rylov's appearance resulted in a FINA investigation on the grounds of "bringing aquatic sports into disrepute" and the loss of his sponsorship contract with Speedo, which said it would donate the remainder of his funding to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.[35][32] The investigation resulted in Rylov receiving a personal nine-month ban from all FINA competitions and activities effective 20 April 2022, making his ban 20 days longer than the general ban on Russian and Belarusian swimmers through the end of 2022.[33][36] Kremlin spokesperson Dmitry Peskov, Russian Olympic Committee president Stanislav Pozdnyakov, and Russian sports minister Oleg Matytsin each denounced the ban, calling it discriminatory, politicized, and "contrary to the ideas of sport."[37]

Ukrainian athletes directly criticized Russian athletes for their participation. Ukrainian gymnast and Olympic medallist Oleg Vernyayev criticized Kuliak for attending and for wearing an Olympic medal he had not earned himself.[21] Ukrainian world-record swimmer Andriy Govorov described seeing his friend Rylov attending the rally and wearing a "Z" symbol as "heartbreaking."[30] Ukrainian ice dancers Oleksandra Nazarova and Maksym Nikitin criticized the figure skaters for their participation, saying that "Not so long ago we supported them in this difficult Olympic season, now they support the war against us and our country."[31][34]

The Latvian government banned performers who participated in the rally from entering the country.[38]

Historian Niall Ferguson described the rally as "fascistic".[39]

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Russian nationalism

Russian nationalism

Russian nationalism is a form of nationalism that promotes Russian cultural identity and unity. Russian nationalism first rose to prominence in the early 19th century, and from its origin in the Russian Empire, to its repression during early Bolshevik rule, and its revival in the Soviet Union, it was closely related to pan-Slavism.

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

Donald John Trump is an American politician, media personality, and businessman who served as the 45th president of the United States from 2017 to 2021.

HuffPost

HuffPost

HuffPost is an American liberal news portal, with localized and international editions. The site offers news, satire, blogs, and original content, and covers politics, business, entertainment, environment, technology, popular media, lifestyle, culture, comedy, healthy living, women's interests, and local news featuring columnists. It was created to provide a liberal alternative to the conservative news websites such as the Drudge Report. The site offers content posted directly on the site as well as user-generated content via video blogging, audio, and photo. In 2012, the website became the first commercially run United States digital media enterprise to win a Pulitzer Prize.

Loro Piana

Loro Piana

Loro Piana is an Italian company specialized in clothing and textile products. It is considered the largest cashmere manufacturer and the world's leading artisan company processing luxury fibers.

Parka

Parka

A parka or anorak is a type of coat with a hood, often lined with fur or faux fur. This kind of garment is a staple of Inuit clothing, traditionally made from caribou or seal skin, for hunting and kayaking in the frigid Arctic. Some Inuit anoraks require regular coating with fish oil to retain their water resistance.

FINA

FINA

FINA is the international federation recognised by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) for administering international competitions in water sports. It is one of several international federations which administer a given sport or discipline for both the IOC and the international community. It is based in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Dmitry Peskov

Dmitry Peskov

Dmitry Sergeyevich Peskov is a Russian diplomat and the press secretary for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Russian Olympic Committee

Russian Olympic Committee

The Russian Olympic Committee is the National Olympic Committee representing Russia.

Oleg Matytsin

Oleg Matytsin

Oleg Vasilyevich Matytsin is a Russian professor and doctor of Pedagogical Sciences, Corresponding Member of Russian Academy of Education and Honoured Doctor of Beijing Sport University. He is currently Minister of Sport of Russia since 2020 and President of the International University Sports Federation (FISU) since 2015. He is also a member of the Presidential Council of the Russian Federation for the Development of Physical Culture and Sport, a member of the International Fair Play Committee and Honorary President of the Russian Students Sport Union (RSSU). Prior to becoming President of FISU, Matytsin played a crucial role in the development of the European University Sports Federation (EUSA), serving as Vice-President from 2007 to 2015.

Oleg Vernyayev

Oleg Vernyayev

Oleg Yuriyovych Vernyayev is a Ukrainian artistic gymnast. He is the 2016 Olympic parallel bars champion and individual all-around silver medalist. Vernyayev is also the 2014 World parallel bars champion, the 2015 European individual all-around champion and the 2017 European individual all-around champion.

Andriy Govorov

Andriy Govorov

Andriy Andriyovych Govorov is a Ukrainian competitive swimmer who holds the world record, European champion and bronze medalist in world championship in 50 meters butterfly.

Oleksandra Nazarova

Oleksandra Nazarova

Oleksandra (Alexandra) Yevhenivna Nazarova is a Ukrainian retired ice dancer. With her skating partner, Maksym Nikitin, she is the 2015 World Junior bronze medalist and 2012 Youth Olympic silver medalist. On the senior level, they are the 2017 Winter Universiade champions, 2014 CS Warsaw Cup silver medalists, 2016 Cup of Nice bronze medalists, six-time Ukrainian national champions. Nazorova/Nikitin have represented Ukraine at the 2018 and 2022 Winter Olympics.

Source: "2022 Moscow rally", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2022_Moscow_rally.

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See also
Notes
  1. ^ "Zа мир без нацизма"; usually written "За мир без нацизма".
  2. ^ "Zа Президента"; usually written "За Президента".
  3. ^ "Zа Россию"; usually written "За Россию".
  4. ^ The opening of the song reads: "The Ukraine and the Crimea, Belarus and Moldova, this is my country! ... Kazakhstan and the Caucasus, and the Baltics too."[11]
  5. ^ Напрасный труд — нет, их не вразумишь,—
    Чем либеральней, тем они пошлее,
    Цивилизация — для них фетиш,
    Но недоступна им ее идея.

    Как перед ней ни гнитесь, господа,
    Вам не снискать признанья от Европы:
    В ее глазах вы будете всегда
    Не слуги просвещенья, а холопы.[14]

    It's no use — you will not understand them —
    The more liberal the more base and cruel.
    Civilization for them is a fetish,
    But inaccessible to them is its ideal.

    Though you may bow before it, citizens,
    You will never win Europe's recognition:
    In its eyes you will always be not servants
    Of Enlightenment but slaves without rights.[15]
References
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  2. ^ a b Nechepurenko, Ivan (18 March 2022). "Putin makes his first public appearance since the invasion of Ukraine". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  3. ^ a b c "Putin Marks Crimea Anniversary, Defends 'Special Operation' in Ukraine in Stadium Rally". The Moscow Times. 18 March 2022. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  4. ^ a b "Putin Tells Mass Rally That Russia Will Prevail in Ukraine". VOA News. Reuters. 18 March 2022. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  5. ^ Patel-Carstairs, Sunita (19 March 2022). "Putin hails 'special operation' in Ukraine at massive celebration party for 'reunification' of Crimea". Sky News. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  6. ^ MacFarquhar, Nick (7 March 2022). "The letter 'Z' has become a symbol for Russians who support the invasion of Ukraine". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 8 March 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  7. ^ Agence France Presse (18 March 2022). "Moscow marks Crimea annexation with patriotic rally". France24. Paris, France. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 8 April 2022.
  8. ^ Chibowska, Karolina (19 March 2022). "Polina Gagarina w ogniu krytyki. Po tym, jak zaśpiewała dla Putina, nie zostawiono na niej suchej nitki" (in Polish). Onet Kobieta. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  9. ^ "Putin tries to rally Russia behind invasion but TV glitch hinders address". The Irish Times. Reuters. 18 March 2022. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  10. ^ John, Tara; Pavlova, Uliana; Graham-Yooll, Anastasia (18 March 2022). "Putin celebrates anniversary of Crimea annexation at stadium rally amid Russia's onslaught of Ukraine". CNN.com. CNN. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  11. ^ Pomerantsev, Peter (19 December 2013). "Born in the USSR". London Review of Books. Archived from the original on 20 March 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  12. ^ Reimann, Nicholas. "Putin Holds Massive Pro-War Rally In Moscow". Forbes. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  13. ^ Anna, Cara (18 March 2022). "Putin appears at big rally as troops press attack in Ukraine". ABC News. Associated Press. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  14. ^ "Напрасный труд — нет, их не вразумишь..." Русская поэзия. Monster. Archived from the original on 18 April 2021. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  15. ^ Cigale, Alex. "Anthology of Russian Minimalist and Miniature Poems; Part I, The Silver Age". Off Course: A Literary Journey. Archived from the original on 27 February 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  16. ^ Tuytchev, Fyodor (1996). Избранное (in Russian). Rostov-on-Don: Феникс. ISBN 5-85880-081-5.
  17. ^ a b c AFP (18 March 2022). "Moscow marks Crimea annexation with patriotic rally". France24. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  18. ^ "Putin praises unity at Moscow rally to support Ukraine invasion". Le Prensa Latina. 18 March 2022. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 20 March 2022.
  19. ^ Vernon, Will (18 March 2022). "Putin hails Crimea annexation and war with lessons on heroism". BBC News. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  20. ^ a b c McCarriston, Shanna (23 March 2022). "Russian Olympic athletes facing backlash after attending rally to support Vladimir Putin". CBS Sports. Archived from the original on 31 March 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  21. ^ a b Bondar, Gregory (23 March 2022). "Олімпійський чемпіон Верняєв висміяв спортсмена з РФ, який вийшов на мітинг на підтримку війни з чужою медаллю". The UNIAN. Kyiv, Ukraine. Archived from the original on 14 April 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  22. ^ "Concert marking the anniversary of Crimea's reunification with Russia". Kremlin. 18 March 2022. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  23. ^ "Putin vows Russia will prevail in Ukraine but glitch hinders TV". Reuters. 18 March 2022. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  24. ^ Vasilyeva, Nataliya (18 March 2022). "Russian TV cuts off Vladimir Putin mid-speech during major Moscow rally". The Telegraph. ISSN 0307-1235. Archived from the original on 18 March 2022. Retrieved 18 March 2022.
  25. ^ a b Zelenskyy, Volodymyr (19 March 2022). "Meaningful talks on peace and security for Ukraine are the only chance for Russia to reduce the damage from its own mistakes". President of Ukraine. Archived from the original on 19 March 2022. Retrieved 19 March 2022.
  26. ^ Cara, Anna (18 March 2022). "Putin praises troops at Moscow rally as Russia continues attack in Ukraine". PBS. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 8 April 2022.
  27. ^ Pengelly, Martin (19 March 2022). "Putin 'channeling his inner Trump' at Moscow rally, says Sean Hannity". The Guardian. London, United Kingdom. Archived from the original on 13 April 2022. Retrieved 8 April 2022.
  28. ^ Nicholson, Kate (18 March 2022). "Putin In Full Dictator Mode During Terrifying Rally In Moscow". HuffPost. Archived from the original on 8 April 2022. Retrieved 8 April 2022.
  29. ^ a b Pavitt, Michael (20 March 2022). "Kuliak set to face one-year ban over "Z" symbol podium display". Inside the Games. London, United Kingdom. Archived from the original on 10 April 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  30. ^ a b Keith, Braden (19 March 2022). "Russian Olympic Swimmer Rylov Appears At Large Pro-War Rally In Moscow". SwimSwam. Austin, Texas. Archived from the original on 9 April 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  31. ^ a b "Russian Olympians face backlash after Vladimir Putin rally". ABC News. 23 March 2022. Archived from the original on 31 March 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  32. ^ a b Lord, Craig (23 March 2022). "Russian Olympic champion Evgeny Rylov faces ban after appearance at Putin rally". The Times. London, United Kingdom. Archived from the original on 2 April 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  33. ^ a b "Russian Olympic gold medallist banned for supporting Ukraine invasion". news.com.au. Sydney, Australia. 22 April 2022. Archived from the original on 23 April 2022. Retrieved 22 April 2022.
  34. ^ a b Jenkins, Sally (24 March 2022). "Russians make figure skating better, but Putin has turned the sport into a battleground". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on 24 March 2022. Retrieved 22 April 2022.
  35. ^ "Russian Olympians face backlash after attending Vladimir Putin rally". ESPN. Bristol, Connecticut. 23 March 2022. Archived from the original on 13 April 2022. Retrieved 26 March 2022.
  36. ^ Martin, Will (22 April 2022). "Russian Olympic winner who claimed to be swimming's biggest star is banned from the sport for attending pro-war rally". Yahoo! Sports. New York, New York. Archived from the original on 22 April 2022. Retrieved 22 April 2022.
  37. ^ "FINA suspends Olympic champion Rylov for nine months over Putin rally". Reuters. London, United Kingdom. 22 April 2022. Archived from the original on 22 April 2022. Retrieved 22 April 2022.
  38. ^ "25 Russian citizens blacklisted in Latvia for war propaganda". Baltic News Network. LETA. 24 March 2022. Archived from the original on 9 April 2022. Retrieved 16 April 2022.
  39. ^ Ferguson, Niall (22 March 2022). "Putin Misunderstands History. So, Unfortunately, Does the U.S." Bloomberg. Retrieved 31 July 2022.

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