Get Our Extension

1984–85 Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C. Season

From Wikipedia, in a visual modern way
Wolverhampton Wanderers
1984–85 season
ChairmanDerek Dougan
ManagerTommy Docherty
Second Division22nd
FA Cup3rd Round
League Cup3rd Round
Top goalscorerLeague:
Ainscow, Buckland & Evans (5)

All:
Ainscow & Evans (6)
Highest home attendance16,698 (vs Birmingham City, 22 September 1984)
Lowest home attendance4,422 (vs Huddersfield Town,
6 May 1985)
Average home league attendance8,353 (league only)

The 1984–85 season was the 86th season of competitive league football in the history of English football club Wolverhampton Wanderers. They played in the second tier of the English football system, the Football League Second Division.

This season would start under the ownership of the Bhatti Brothers "Allied Properties" with 1970's club legend Derek Dougan in role of Chairman, whilst Tommy Docherty was hired to lead the team as manager, succeeding Graham Hawkins who had been dismissed at the end of the previous season following relegation the top tier.[1]

The team would suffer a further relegation finishing the 84/85 season in 22nd place during what was a difficult period from the club due to financial difficulties.[2]

Discover more about 1984–85 Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C. Season related topics

Association football

Association football

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played between two teams of 11 players who primarily use their feet to propel a ball around a rectangular field called a pitch. The objective of the game is to score more goals than the opposite team by moving the ball beyond the goal line into a rectangular-framed goal defended by the opposing side. Traditionally, the game has been played over two 45 minute halves, for a total match time of 90 minutes. With an estimated 250 million players active in over 200 countries and territories, it is considered the world's most popular sport.

Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C.

Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C.

Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club, commonly known as Wolves, is a professional football club based in Wolverhampton, England, which compete in the Premier League. The club has played at Molineux Stadium since moving from Dudley Road in 1889. The club's traditional kit consists of old gold shirts and socks with black shorts. Since 1979, the kit has also featured the club's "wolf's head" logo. Long-standing rivalries exist with other clubs from the West Midlands, the main one being the Black Country derby contested with West Bromwich Albion.

English football league system

English football league system

The English football league system, also known as the football pyramid, is a series of interconnected leagues for men's association football clubs in England, with five teams from Wales, one from Guernsey, one from Jersey and one from the Isle of Man also competing. The system has a hierarchical format with promotion and relegation between leagues at different levels, allowing even the smallest club the theoretical possibility of ultimately rising to the very top of the system, the Premier League. Below that are levels 2–4 organised by the English Football League, then the National League System from levels 5–10 administered by the FA, and thereafter feeder leagues run by relevant county FAs on an ad hoc basis.

Football League Second Division

Football League Second Division

The Football League Second Division was the second level division in the English football league system between 1892 and 1992. Following the foundation of the FA Premier League, the Football League divisions were renumbered and the third tier became known as the Football League Second Division. After the rebranding of the Football League in 2003–04, it became known as Football League One.

Derek Dougan

Derek Dougan

Alexander Derek Dougan was a Northern Ireland international footballer, football manager, football chairman, pundit, and writer. He was also known by his nickname, "The Doog". He was capped by Northern Ireland at schoolboy, youth, Amateur, and 'B' team level, before he won 43 caps in a 15-year career for the senior team from 1958 to 1973, scoring eight international goals and featuring in the 1958 FIFA World Cup. He also played in the Shamrock Rovers XI v Brazil exhibition match in July 1973, which he also helped to organise.

Tommy Docherty

Tommy Docherty

Thomas Henderson Docherty, commonly known as The Doc, was a Scottish football player and manager. Docherty played for several clubs, most notably Preston North End, and represented Scotland 25 times between 1951 and 1959. He then managed a total of 13 clubs between 1961 and 1988, as well as the Scottish national team. Docherty was manager of Manchester United between 1972 and 1977, during which time they were relegated to the Second Division, but promoted back to the First Division as champions at the first attempt.

Graham Hawkins

Graham Hawkins

Graham Norman Hawkins was an English football player and manager. During a sixteen year playing career in the English Football League he made a total of 502 league and cup appearances, scoring eleven goals. He spent fourteen years coaching and eight years in management, and spent the later years of his life working as a football administrator.

Background

Appointment of new Manager.

Scotsman, Docherty, often affectionately referred to as "The Doc" had been appointed as Manager at the Molineux based club in June 1984 following the clubs relegation from Division 1.

Docherty was a well travelled player and manager, having taken charge of six different teams during the previous seven years before his appointment at the Molineux and had already spent time in the Midlands at Wolves local rivals Aston Villa where he had been sacked in 1970 with the club bottom of Division Two. By the time he had been appointed Manager at the Wolves, Docherty had already quite an eclectic Managerial experience.[3]

In his first managerial role in 1967/68, he famously vowed to take Rotherham United up out of Division 2, but instead performed the opposite, taking them down to Division 3. His next big spell was at Villa before moving overseas to Porto and had also enjoyed time as an international manager with his native Scotland, guiding them towards the 1974 World Cup but he was to quit this role before qualification was secured to take over as manager at Manchester United.[4]

Docherty experienced relegation and promotion from/to the Division 1 with 'United' and his Red Devils also defeated Liverpool to win the 1977 FA Cup, only for Docherty to be sacked days later due to having an affair with the club physiotherapists wife.[5]

Docherty nomadic path saw him manage several British based clubs following this for short periods and he would also spend time working in Australia at Sydney Olympic on two occasions. The later would be his last role prior to his appointment at Wolves.[6]

Financial Constraints.

Docherty's task at Wolves was not to be an easy one. Wolves had been spending big during the late 1970's with a showbiz fervour. An example of this was on 8 September 1979, prior to Wolverhampton Wanderers kick off at home to Crystal Palace, the Molineux crowd were treated to the pre match celebration of new player Andy Gray being presented to them and signing a contract in front of the fans and media for a new British Transfer record of 1.5 Million Pounds.[7] Gray would later score the winning goal for Wolves in the 1980 League Cup Final.[8]

By the late 70's, Wolves stadium was starting to look and feel rather dated and had deteriorated from the once great stadium that had been at the forefront of modern football. The stadium where Wolves would win three league titles and would host Hungarian champions Honved under the floodlights in front of 55,00 fans in 1954, pioneering modern European Club Football.[9]

In 1978 The Safety of Sports Grounds Act legislature had been introduced. The Act would require all sports arena to modernise their facilities in order to host events, setting a minimum legal requirement to ensure a safe environment for staff and spectators. The Molineux Street Stand that was witnes to that great night in 1954 was now a "50 year old wooden relic". It was tired and deemed not fit for purpose under the new legislature. If Wolves intended to use the stand, it needed to be rebuilt but the Chairman Harry Marshall had bigger plans than this.[10]

After the Molineux Street Stand had been declared unsafe, Marshall began planning for a whole new stadium, at an estimated cost of £10 Million Pounds, to be part funded by incoming attendance monies, It would be the first brand new permanent football stadium in the U.K. to be constructed since the Second World War and the forward thinking design was rumoured to include the possibility of installing an enclosed roof by 1984.

"It is a bold move on our part and the design is revolutionary but we want to start something future generations will be proud of as we move into our second 100 years," Marshall stated in 1978.[11]

The construction began with the demolition of 71 terraced houses the club had purchased to create space for the new "John Ireland Stand" and despite its completion, progress on the other stands had not begun. The project so far cost more than £2,000,000 and by 2 July 1982, the writing was on the wall with the local newspaper leading with the front page headline "Wolves have gone bust".[12]

With the building of the new infrastructure, Wolves had surmounted debts of £2,600,000 by 1982 and new investors were needed to save the club. Fortunately three suitors put their names forward for the acquisition of the club. Local businessman Sir Jack Hayward was one interested party putting forwards a proposal and Doug Ellis, chairman of local rival Aston Villa was a second, considering purchasing the club on the cheap monopoly style but, with Wolves less than an hour of away from going out of business, a consortium lead by Saudi Arabian brothers Mahmud and Mohammad Bhatti were selected.[13]

Fronting the bid on behalf of the Bhatti Brothers "Allied Properties" banner was Wolves 1970's legend Derek Dougan who had played for the club during the 1972 European Cup Final. Northern Irishman Dougan would be placed in charge of the football side of operations in the role of Chairman adding more gravitas and credibility to the brothers proposal.[14]

The Bhatti Brothers "Allied Properties" project had pinned its hopes on the redevelopment of the Molineux site and immediate surrounding area, but with more interest in the land than on the pitch, their tenure would show a genuine lack of interest and involvement in the football from the brother and sentiment towards the club soured when they failed to secure a deal and planning permissions with the local council for an area immediately behind the Molineux stadium which they had planned to develop. With little finance and a lack of enthusiasm to secure the day-to-day funding required to run the club, the rest of the stadium fell further into disrepair and with attendances dwindling.[15][16]

Build up to the season.

By the time Docherty arrived to take over for the 1984/85 season players like record signing Andy Gray had long left the club, and during the summer of '84, following relegation from the top flight, more players were to also leave.

Two such player were prominent attackers Mel Eves and Wayne Clarke. 27 year old Eves had made 180 Wolves starts and scored 44 goals for the club, leaving Wolves to train with Mancherster City following a ruptured achilles tendon injury which he picked up in his final Wolves match in 84, (eventually joining Sheffield United for an undisclosed fee) whilst Clarke, who had started 148 starts in the Old Gold and scored 30 goals also left for an initial £80,000 local rivals Birmingham Citywith a clause entitling Wolves to 50% of any future sale[17][18]

Winger Tony Towner also departed that summer having been signed from Rotherham United only 12 months earlier becoming a first team regular, for £100,000. Towner famously had been on then manager Graham Hawkins pre-season shopping list, presented to Dougan, but Hawkins was made furious to find that Dougan had spent so much of the budget on him whilst he and head coach Jim Barron were out of the country. Towner would move to Charlton Athletic for just £15,000.[19][20]

Perhaps most significantly was the loss of Wolves legend Kenny Hibbitt. The Midfielder, the club's second highest appearances holder (574) and tenth top scorer (114) also calling time on his Molineux career, opting for a move to Coventry City for an undisclosed fee. Asked for his thoughts on leaving the club, club legend Kenny said "Tommy Docherty came in as manager and he knew I didn't want to be around to see the club in such dire straits".[21][22][23]

As the start of the season approached, there was yet more selection issues. John Burridge, who been first choice goalkeeper for the last two season was out of contract and making demands of the club. With the season kicking off with a home game against Sheffield United, Docherty was to make a bold decision. Rather than meet Burridge's demands, the club would bring in 17 year-old academy keeper Tim Flowers for his league debut.[24][25]

Discover more about Background related topics

Molineux Stadium

Molineux Stadium

Molineux Stadium in Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England, has been the home ground of Premier League club Wolverhampton Wanderers since 1889. The first stadium built for use by a Football League club, it was one of the first British grounds to have floodlights installed and hosted some of the earliest European club games in the 1950s.

Aston Villa F.C.

Aston Villa F.C.

Aston Villa Football Club is a professional football club based in Aston, Birmingham, England. The club competes in the Premier League, the top tier of the English football league system. Founded in 1874, they have played at their home ground, Villa Park, since 1897. Aston Villa is one of the oldest and most successful clubs in England, having won the Football League First Division seven times, the FA Cup seven times, the League Cup five times, and the European Cup and European (UEFA) Super Cup once.

1969–70 Aston Villa F.C. season

1969–70 Aston Villa F.C. season

The 1969–70 English football season was Aston Villa's 70th season in the Football League, this season playing in the Football League Second Division. On 19 January 1970, with Villa bottom of the Second Division, manager Tommy Docherty was sacked. Vic Crowe was subsequently appointed manager.

1967–68 in English football

1967–68 in English football

The 1967–68 season was the 88th season of competitive football in England. Defending First Division champions, Manchester United, became the first English team to win the European Cup, while the First Division title went to their cross city rivals City. West Bromwich Albion lifted the FA Cup this season, for the fifth time in their history. Leeds United won their first two major trophies when they lifted the Inter-Cities Fairs Cup and Football League Cup at the expense of an Arsenal side who had not played at Wembley for 16 years.

1974 FIFA World Cup

1974 FIFA World Cup

The 1974 FIFA World Cup was the tenth FIFA World Cup, a quadrennial football tournament for men's senior national teams, and was played in West Germany between 13 June and 7 July. The tournament marked the first time that the current trophy, the FIFA World Cup Trophy, created by the Italian sculptor Silvio Gazzaniga, was awarded. The previous trophy, the Jules Rimet Trophy, had been won for the third time by Brazil in 1970 and awarded permanently to the Brazilians. This was the first out of three World Cups to feature two rounds of group stages.

Manchester United F.C.

Manchester United F.C.

Manchester United Football Club, commonly referred to as Man United, or simply United, is a professional football club based in Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, England. The club competes in the Premier League, the top division in the English football league system. Nicknamed the Red Devils, it was founded as Newton Heath LYR Football Club in 1878, but changed its name to Manchester United in 1902. The club moved from Newton Heath to its current stadium, Old Trafford, in 1910.

1977 FA Cup final

1977 FA Cup final

The 1977 FA Cup final was the final match of the 1976–77 FA Cup, the 96th season of England's premier cup football competition. The match was played on 21 May 1977 at Wembley Stadium, London, and it was contested by Manchester United and Liverpool. United won the game 2–1. All three goals came in a five-minute period early in the second half. Stuart Pearson opened the scoring when he latched onto a long ball forward and drove a hard shot past Ray Clemence. Liverpool equalised through Jimmy Case soon after, as he turned and hooked a right foot half-volley into the top corner, giving Stepney no chance. However, just three minutes later, United regained the lead when Lou Macari's shot deflected off teammate Jimmy Greenhoff's chest and looped into the net past Clemence and Phil Neal on the line. Jimmy Greenhoff's brother Brian was also in the United line-up, making them the first pair of brothers to play in a winning FA Cup final team since George and Ted Robledo played for Newcastle United in 1952.

Australia

Australia

Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. With an area of 7,617,930 square kilometres (2,941,300 sq mi), Australia is the largest country by area in Oceania and the world's sixth-largest country. Australia is the oldest, flattest, and driest inhabited continent, with the least fertile soils. It is a megadiverse country, and its size gives it a wide variety of landscapes and climates, with deserts in the centre, tropical rainforests in the north-east, and mountain ranges in the south-east.

Crystal Palace F.C.

Crystal Palace F.C.

Crystal Palace Football Club is a professional football club based in Selhurst in the Borough of Croydon, South London, England, who compete in the Premier League, the highest level of English football. Although formally created as a professional outfit in 1905, the club's origins can be traced as far back as 1861, when an amateur Crystal Palace football team was established at the Crystal Palace Exhibition building. This has led to claims by the club that Crystal Palace should be recognised as the oldest professional football club in the world, after historians discovered a lineage through the Crystal Palace Company. Both the amateur and professional clubs played inside the grounds of the Palace, with the professional club using the FA Cup Final stadium for its home games until 1915, when they were forced to leave due to the outbreak of the First World War. In 1924, they moved to their current home at Selhurst Park.

Andy Gray (footballer, born 1955)

Andy Gray (footballer, born 1955)

Andrew Mullen Gray is a Scottish football broadcaster and former player.

Budapest Honvéd FC

Budapest Honvéd FC

Budapest Honvéd Football Club, commonly known as Budapest Honvéd or simply Honvéd, is a Hungarian sports club based in Kispest, Budapest, with the colours of red and black. The club is best known for its football team. Honvéd means the Homeland Defence. Originally formed as Kispest AC, they became Kispest FC in 1926 before reverting to their original name in 1944.

Floodlight

Floodlight

A floodlight is a broad-beamed, high-intensity artificial light. They are often used to illuminate outdoor playing fields while an outdoor sports event is being held during low-light conditions. More focused kinds are often used as a stage lighting instrument in live performances such as concerts and plays.

The Season

Wolves season would start the season at Molineux stadium with the club hosting newly promoted Sheffield United who had finished 3rd in Division 3 the year before. Academy players Tim Flowers and Derek Ryan would make their league debuts for the club alongside new signings Alan Ainscow, Tony Evans and Tommy Langley. They were joined by an experienced defence of John Humphrey, Geoff Palmer and John Pender alongside experienced wingers/utility players Paul Butler, Ian Cartwright and Alan Dodd. The game finishing Wolves 2-2 Sheffield United with Langley and Dodd scoring in front of almost 15,000 fans.[26]

After 5 matches Wolves were placed 10th in the table having taken two home victories against Manchester City and Charlton Athletic, a further draw at Middlesbrough and one defeat at Leeds. The players who started in opening day fixture had continued to feature across this early period of the season and would be joined by goalscorers Mark Buckland and Paul Dougherty (who had both been signed in the back end of 1984). Wolves also brought in some experience with Celtic loan signing Jim Melrose adding to the nucleus of the squad.[27][28][29][30]

During the next four games however Wolves would start to slip down the table to 15th place due to a series of back to back league defeats, including a 5-1 televised thumping at Barnsley, live on ITV, with Palmer and Flowers both giving away penalties in the match.[31]

With the early progress looking respectable, Wolves approved the sale of goalkeeper John Burridge to Sheffield United (who had been out on loan to Derby County since the start of the season)[32] and added additions to their ranks with defender David Barnes signing from Ipswich Town for £44,000 and Kiwi midfielder Ricki Herbert joining from Docherty's old club Sydney Olympic for free.[33]

A period of three wins in succession would see Wolves climb a couple of positions to 13th in the table before Wolves travelled to Grimsby for their second 5-1 thumping of the season, once again televised live on ITV for the nation to see.[34]

Hoping the heavy defeats were behind them, by the end of November Wolves had picked up a further four points with a 3-3 draw at home to Wimbledon and a 2-1 victory at Craven Cottage. As December approached, Wolves sat 14th in the table, with top scorers Tony Evans (5), Tommy Langley (4) and Mark Buckland (4) having a modest total of 13 goals between them.[35][36]

Wolves were misfiring but must have been confident enough with progress, allowing Geoff Palmer to move to Burnley at the end of November. Palmer, having been capped 394 times for the club, was a very experienced defender and with this departure, Wolves were allowing more experience to walk out the door. Palmer left believing he had fallen out if favour with Docherty and cited that "the club just wasn’t a nice place to be at the time, it wasn’t being run properly, and was on its knees."[37]

From December onwards, Wolves hit an awful period of form, failing to win any of the next 19 league games including a 4-1 defeat to Notts County who were relegated along with Wolves in 83-84 and would go on to finish 21st in the league.[38]

Pressure was mounting in January 1985 and former fan favourite and now Chairman Derek Dougan eventually resigned from his position on the board.[16]

During January Wolves continued to haemorrhage on field experience with Alan Dodd, capped 99 times for the club, 24 of them under Docherty and having scored 3 vital goals would be released, moving on to Stoke City whilst Paul Butler who had also been a prominent feature for Docherty with 22 appearances and 2 goals was loaned to Hereford United who later made the move permanent.[39]

Before the season ended, top scorers and first team wingers Tony Evans (5), Tommy Langley (4), Paul Dougherty (2) and Danny Crainie would also be sent out on temporary loan spells, to be replaced by two new signings (Ray Hankin and Andy King) and two incoming loanee's (Peter Eastoe and Steve Biggins). The incoming quartet would score just one goal between them that season in what seems like a bizarre decision with the only good bit of business coming with the signing of defender Peter Zelem from Chester City and the promotion of young academy player Campbell Chapman, son of head coach Sammy Chapman[40]

On 4th May 1985, Wolves travelled to Brighton & Hove Albion and received their third 5-1 thumping of the season, this time, unfortunately for West Bromwich Albion fans was not to be televised live. During the game, goalkeeper Tim Flowers received a head injury whilst stopping a 27th minute penalty at 2-0 down. Flowers was not allowed treatment for the injury and the referee had the spot kick was retaken. Whilst this was a controversial moment. There was nothing controversial about the result with Wolves officially being relegated to the third division that day.[41]

The following game would be the penultimate of the season and would also be Docherty final home match at Molineux. The match would be a rare success with Wolves recording their 8th win of the season in a 2-1 victory over Huddersfield Town with a diminished crowd of 4,422. Down 10,400 from the crowd that had witnessed Docherty's first game in charge just eight months previous. Scott Barrett was selected in goal for the match, replacing the injured Flowers and on the scoresheet were Alan Ainscow and Derek Ryan, two players who had made their debuts for Wolves on the opening day. The decreased attendance had been a reflection on what had been a beleaguering and battering season that the club had experienced.[42][43]

The final day of the season, 11 May 1985, is a date etched in the memory of many football fans as whilst Wolves were losing 3-0 to promotion hopefuls Blackburn Rovers at Ewood Park (they would miss out on promotion by 1 point), 41.6 miles East, Bradford City were drawing 0-0 with Lincoln Town when a small fire started in Block G of Valley Parade, killing 56 spectators in what was a dark and tragic day for football.[44]

Docherty's torrid season, which included a run of 21 games without a win had finally come to an end and he left the club in July 1985. When asked about his time at Wolves Docherty said, "I could hardly say ‘no’ when a club as famous as that came in for me..... But it was a hopeless task really. There was no money. I wasn’t sure I’d be able to work with Derek Dougan but I accepted the challenge anyway. As for the Bhattis, I only met them twice – once when they hired me and once when they fired me."

The season was full of low points for the club with several heavy defeats, strings of losses and fan favourites departing the club but Docherty giving a club debut to a young 17 year old local lad Tim Flowers, from Kenilworth (who would be named player of the year 1985) and sticking by him all season would be remembered as a high.[45]

But the darker side of Docherty will also be remembered, removing Assistant Manager Jim Barron and Coach Frank Upton from their roles to make way for family members. A decision which was challenged at a Employment Tribunal in favour of Barron/Upton.[46]

Wolves would now prepare for a season in Division 3 and a search for a new manager.

Discover more about The Season related topics

1983–84 Football League

1983–84 Football League

The 1983–84 season was the 85th completed season of the English Football League.

Alan Ainscow

Alan Ainscow

Alan Ainscow is an English former professional footballer who made more than 450 appearances in the Football League.

John Humphrey (footballer)

John Humphrey (footballer)

John Humphrey is an English former professional footballer who played as a defender from 1979 until 1997.

Geoff Palmer (footballer)

Geoff Palmer (footballer)

Geoff Palmer is a former professional footballer, who spent almost his entire career with Wolverhampton Wanderers.

John Pender (footballer)

John Pender (footballer)

John Patrick Pender is an Irish retired professional footballer who played as a central defender. He is one of only two Burnley captains to have led the side to two promotions, the other being Martin Dobson.

Ian Cartwright

Ian Cartwright

Ian J. Cartwright was an English footballer, who played in the Football League for Wolverhampton Wanderers.

Alan Dodd

Alan Dodd

Alan Dodd is an English former professional footballer who played in England for Stoke City, Wolverhampton Wanderers and Port Vale; he also played in Sweden and the Republic of Ireland.

Manchester City F.C.

Manchester City F.C.

Manchester City Football Club are an English football club based in Manchester that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. Founded in 1880 as St. Mark's , they became Ardwick Association Football Club in 1887 and Manchester City in 1894. The club's home ground is the Etihad Stadium in east Manchester, to which they moved in 2003, having played at Maine Road since 1923. Manchester City adopted their sky blue home shirts in 1894, in the first season with the current name. Over the course of its history, the club has won eight league titles, six FA Cups, eight League Cups, six FA Community Shields, and one European Cup Winners' Cup.

Charlton Athletic F.C.

Charlton Athletic F.C.

Charlton Athletic Football Club is an English professional football club based in Charlton, south-east London, which compete in EFL League One. Their home ground is The Valley, where the club have played since 1919. They have also played at The Mount in Catford during the 1923–24 season, and spent seven years at Selhurst Park and the Boleyn Ground between 1985 and 1992, due to financial issues, and then safety concerns raised by the local council. The club's traditional kit consists of red shirts, white shorts and red socks, and their most commonly used nickname is The Addicks. Charlton share local rivalries with fellow South London clubs Crystal Palace and Millwall.

Leeds United F.C.

Leeds United F.C.

Leeds United Football Club is a professional football club based in Leeds, West Yorkshire in England. The club competes in the Premier League, the highest level of the English football league system, and plays its home matches at Elland Road.

Celtic F.C.

Celtic F.C.

The Celtic Football Club, commonly known as Celtic, is a Scottish professional football club based in Glasgow, which plays in the Scottish Premiership. The club was founded in 1887 with the purpose of alleviating poverty in the immigrant Irish population in the East End of Glasgow. They played their first match in May 1888, a friendly match against Rangers which Celtic won 5–2. Celtic established themselves within Scottish football, winning six successive league titles during the first decade of the 20th century. The club enjoyed their greatest successes during the 1960s and 70s under Jock Stein, when they won nine consecutive league titles and the 1967 European Cup. Celtic have played in green and white throughout their history, adopting hoops in 1903, which have been used ever since.

Jim Melrose

Jim Melrose

James Millsopp Melrose is a Scottish retired professional footballer who played as a striker. Melrose made nearly 400 appearances in the Scottish and English Football Leagues between 1975 and 1990, scoring nearly 100 goals.

Results

Football League Second Division

A total of 22 teams competed in the Football League Second Division in the 1984–85 season. Each team played every other team twice: once at their stadium, and once at the opposition's. Three points were awarded to teams for each win, one point per draw, and none for defeats.

25 August 1984 1 Wolves 2–2 Sheffield United Molineux
Dodd 17'
Langley 18'
Edwards 50'
Arnott 80'
Attendance: 14,908
1 September 1984 2 Leeds United 3-2 Wolves Elland Road
Wright 40'
Lorimer 63'
Wright 70'
Ainscow 23'
Dougherty 52'
Attendance: 17,843
4 September 1984 3 Wolves 2-0 Manchester City Molineux
Dougherty 11'
McCarthy 28' (og)
Attendance: 13,255
8 September 1984 4 Wolves 1-0 Charlton Athletic Molineux
Langley 53' Attendance: 10,587
15 September 1984 5 Middlesbrough 1-1 Wolves Ayresome Park
Mowbray 34' Buckland 34' Attendance: 4677
19 September 1984 6 Oxford United 3-1 Wolves Manor Ground
Aldridge 15'
Biggins 74'
Aldridge 75'
Langan 55' (og) Attendance: 11,930
22 September 1984 7 Wolves 0-2 Birmingham Molineux
Kuhl 79'
Hopkins 84'
Attendance: 16,698
29 September 1984 8 Barnsley 5-1 Wolves Oakwell
Geddis 29'
Agnew 57'
Geddis 59'
Geddis 62' (Pen)
Owen 85'
Dodd 21' Attendance: 5,566
6 October 1984 9 Wolves 2-3 Notts County Molineux
Buckland 9'
Langley 21'
O'Neill 25'
Harkouk 33'
Pender 58' (og)
Attendance: 7,676
13 October 1984 10 Oldham Athletic 3-2 Wolves Boundary Park
Parker 10'
Palmer 39'
Henry 63'
Tony Evans 27'
Tony Evans 90'
Attendance: 3,856
20 October 1984 11 Wolves 2-1 Crystal Palace Molineux
Tony Evans 8'
Melrose 58'
Cummins 78' (Pen) Attendance: 6,665
27 October 1984 12 Portsmouth 0-1 Wolves Fratton Park
Melrose 58' Attendance: 15,291
3 November 1984 13 Wolves 3-0 Cardiff Molineux
Pender 59'
Buckland 66'
Tony Evans 86'
Attendance: 7,537
10 November 1984 14 Grimsby Town 5-1 Wolves Blundell Park
Wilkinson 10'
Barnes 42' (og)
Bonnyman 51' (Pen)
Drinkell 75'
Ford 85'
Langley 52' Attendance: 7,220
17 November 1984 15 Wolves 3-3 Wimbledon Molineux
Barnes 14'
Ainscow 36'
Butler 38'
Cork 31'
Winterburn 74'
Morris 84'
Attendance: 7,134
24 November 1984 16 Fulham 1-2 Wolves Craven Cottage
Houghton 17' Buckland 56'
Cartwright 68'
Attendance: 7,049
1 December 1984 17 Wolves 0-1 Brighton & Hove Albion Molineux
Young 44' Attendance: 7,463
8 December 1984 18 Huddersfield Town 3-1 Wolves Leeds Road
Cooper 40'
Cooper 41'
Burke 61'
Buckland 31' Attendance: 8,216
15 December 1984 19 Wolves 0-3 Blackburn Rovers Molineux
Randall 46'
Quinn 80'
Quinn 82'
Attendance: 7,598
22 December 1984 20 Wolves 0-2 Leeds United Molineux
Gray 35'
McCluskey 59'
Attendance: 9,259
26 December 1984 21 Shrewsbury Town 2-1 Wolves Gay Meadow
Robinson 44'
McNally 78'
Ainscow 56' Attendance: 9,183
29 December 1984 22 Manchester City 4-0 Wolves Maine Road
Barker 9'
Phillips 42'
Smith 69'
Wilson 88'
Attendance: 22,022
1 January 1985 23 Wolves 0-2 Carlisle United Molineux
O'Riordan 22'
Poskett 29'
Attendance: 6,246
12 January 1985 24 Wolves 0-0 Middlesbrough Molineux
Attendance: 6,152
26 January 1985 25 Sheffield United 2-2 Wolves Bramall Lane
Cockerill 46'
Pender 57' (og)
Campbell Chapman 51'
Butler 88'
Attendance: 9,141
2 February 1985 26 Wolves 0-1 Barnsley Molineux
Futcher 54' Attendance: 6,348
23 February 1985 27 Cardiff City 0-0 Wolves Ninian Park
Attendance: 4,694
2 March 1985 28 Wolves 0-0 Portsmouth Molineux
Attendance: 7,985
5 March 1985 29 Wolves 0-1 Grimsby Town Molineux
Ford 55' Attendance: 6,127
9 March 1985 30 Crystal Palace 0-0 Wolves Selhurst Park
Attendance: 5,413
12 March 1985 31 Charlton Athletic 1-0 Wolves The Valley
Flannagan 24' Attendance: 3,905
16 March 1985 32 Wolves 0-3 Oldham Athletic Molineux
Quinn 10' (Pen)
Ward 62'
Palmer 89'
Attendance: 5,273
23 March 1985 33 Notts County 4-1 Wolves Meadow Lane
Young 59'
Harkouk 66'
Harkouk 77'
Fashanu 87'
Hankin 85' Attendance: 5,561
30 March 1985 34 Birmingham City 1-0 Wolves St. Andrew's (stadium)
Geddis 80' Attendance: 10,230
6 April 1985 35 Wolves 0-1 Shrewsbury Town Molineux
Herbert 22' (og) Attendance: 7,258
8 April 1985 36 Carlisle United 0-1 Wolves Brunton Park
Evans 62' Attendance: 4021
13 April 1985 37 Wolves 1-2 Oxford United Molineux
Campbell Chapman 60' Briggs 58'
Brock 62'
Attendance: 7,258
20 April 1985 38 Wimbledon 1-1 Wolves Brunton Park
Sayer 36' Ainscow 51' Attendance: 3,277
27 April 1985 39 Wolves 0-4 Fulham Molineux
Houghton 51'
Sealy 13'
Sealy 40'
Sealy 54'
Attendance: 6,172
4 May 1985 40 Brighton & Hove Albion 5-1 Wolves Goldstone Ground
Worthington 10'
Penney 24'
Worthington (Pen) 27'
Biley 54'
Connor 79'
O'Reilly 41' (og) Attendance: 8,581
6 May 1985 41 Wolves 2-1 Huddersfield Molineux
Ainscow 37'
Derek Ryan 49'
Lillis 55' (Pen) Attendance: 4,422
11 May 1985 42 Blackburn Rovers 3-0 Wolves Ewood Park
Fazackerley 40' (Pen)
Keeley 63'
Lowey 64'
Attendance: 9,543

[21]

Final table

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
17 Charlton Athletic 42 11 12 19 47 63 0-13 45
18 Sheffield United 42 10 14 18 54 66 0-12 44
19 Middlesbrough 42 10 10 22 41 57 0-16 40
20 Notts County (R) 42 10 7 25 40 73 0–33 37
21 Cardiff City (R) 42 9 8 25 47 79 0-32 35
22 Wolverhampton Wanderers 42 8 9 25 37 79 0-42 33

Source: Footballstatisticsresults.co.uk

Results by round

Round123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627282930313233343536373839404142
ResultDLWWDLLLLLWWWLDWLLLLLLLDDLDDLDLLLLLWLDLLWL
Position9161181011141415191716131716141315151518202020202020202020202021212120202122222222
Source: Statto.com
W = Win; D = Draw; L = Loss

FA Cup

5 January 1985 R3 Wolverhampton Wanderers 1–1 Huddersfield Town Molineux
Pender 40' Tempest 32' Attendance: 8,593
23 January 1985 R3 Replay Huddersfield Town 3–1 Wolverhampton Wanderers Leeds Road
Lillis 39' (Pen)
Lillis 46'
Pugh 87'
Ainscow 56' Attendance: 7,055

League Cup

Round 2

24 September 1984 Round 2.1 Port Vale 1–2 Wolverhampton Wanderers Vale Park
Brown 30' Evans 49'
Dodd 83'
Attendance: 6.949
9 October 1984 Round 2.2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 0–0 Port Vale Molineux
Pender 40' Tempest 32' Attendance: 5,964

Wolves Progress on Aggregate Results

Round 3

30 October 1984 Round 3.1 Southampton 2–2 Wolverhampton Wanderers The Dell
Wright 35'
Wallace 89'
Melrose 22'
Melrose 47'
Attendance: 14,164
6 November 1984 Round 3.2 Wolverhampton Wanderers 0–2 Southampton Molineux Stadium
Wallace 13'
Jordan 89'
Attendance: 13,064

Wolves Lost on Aggregate Results

Discover more about Results related topics

1984–85 Football League

1984–85 Football League

The 1984–85 season was the 86th completed season of The Football League.

Football League Second Division

Football League Second Division

The Football League Second Division was the second level division in the English football league system between 1892 and 1992. Following the foundation of the FA Premier League, the Football League divisions were renumbered and the third tier became known as the Football League Second Division. After the rebranding of the Football League in 2003–04, it became known as Football League One.

Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C.

Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C.

Wolverhampton Wanderers Football Club, commonly known as Wolves, is a professional football club based in Wolverhampton, England, which compete in the Premier League. The club has played at Molineux Stadium since moving from Dudley Road in 1889. The club's traditional kit consists of old gold shirts and socks with black shorts. Since 1979, the kit has also featured the club's "wolf's head" logo. Long-standing rivalries exist with other clubs from the West Midlands, the main one being the Black Country derby contested with West Bromwich Albion.

Sheffield United F.C.

Sheffield United F.C.

Sheffield United Football Club is a professional football club in Sheffield, South Yorkshire, England, which compete in the EFL Championship. They are nicknamed "the Blades" due to Sheffield's history of cutlery production. The team have played home games at Bramall Lane since their formation. For most of the club's history, United have played in red and white striped shirts with black shorts. Their main rivals are Sheffield Wednesday, with whom they contest the Steel City derby.

Molineux Stadium

Molineux Stadium

Molineux Stadium in Wolverhampton, West Midlands, England, has been the home ground of Premier League club Wolverhampton Wanderers since 1889. The first stadium built for use by a Football League club, it was one of the first British grounds to have floodlights installed and hosted some of the earliest European club games in the 1950s.

Alan Dodd

Alan Dodd

Alan Dodd is an English former professional footballer who played in England for Stoke City, Wolverhampton Wanderers and Port Vale; he also played in Sweden and the Republic of Ireland.

Tommy Langley

Tommy Langley

Thomas William Langley is an English retired footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s as a striker. He is currently one of the hosts of Matchnight Live on Chelsea TV.

Leeds United F.C.

Leeds United F.C.

Leeds United Football Club is a professional football club based in Leeds, West Yorkshire in England. The club competes in the Premier League, the highest level of the English football league system, and plays its home matches at Elland Road.

Elland Road

Elland Road

Elland Road is a football stadium in Beeston, Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, which has been the home of Premier League club Leeds United since the club's formation in 1919. The stadium is the 14th largest football stadium in England.

Alan Ainscow

Alan Ainscow

Alan Ainscow is an English former professional footballer who made more than 450 appearances in the Football League.

Paul Dougherty

Paul Dougherty

Paul Dougherty is an English former professional soccer player and soccer coach who began his career with Wolverhampton Wanderers in England. He then moved to the United States where he became a journeyman player, bouncing through sixteen teams in multiple indoor and outdoor leagues.

Manchester City F.C.

Manchester City F.C.

Manchester City Football Club are an English football club based in Manchester that competes in the Premier League, the top flight of English football. Founded in 1880 as St. Mark's , they became Ardwick Association Football Club in 1887 and Manchester City in 1894. The club's home ground is the Etihad Stadium in east Manchester, to which they moved in 2003, having played at Maine Road since 1923. Manchester City adopted their sky blue home shirts in 1894, in the first season with the current name. Over the course of its history, the club has won eight league titles, six FA Cups, eight League Cups, six FA Community Shields, and one European Cup Winners' Cup.

Players

Key:
  ‡ On loan from another club   * First appearance(s) for the club

Correct as of end of season. Starting appearances are listed first, followed by substitute appearances in parentheses where applicable.

PosNamePGPGPGPGPG A yellow card A red card Notes
League FA CupLeague CupOtherTotalDiscipline
GK England Tim Flowers 38 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 44 0 0 0
GK England Scott Barrett 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0
GK England John Burridge 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0
DF England John Humphrey 42 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 48 0 2 0
DF Republic of Ireland John Pender 34(2) 1 2 1 3 0 0 0 39(2) 2 9 0
DF England David Barnes 23 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 28 1 1 0
DF England Alan Dodd 20 2 0 0 4 1 0 0 24 3 2 0
DF England Peter Zelem 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 0 1 0
DF England Geoff Palmer 8 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0 1 0
DF England David Heywood 7 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0
DF England Mick Coady 6(1) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6(1) 0 0 0
DF England Nicky Sinclair 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
MF England Alan Ainscow 40(2) 5 2 1 2(1) 0 0 0 44(3) 6 5 0
MF England Ian Cartwright 23 1 1 0 4 0 0 0 28 1 0 0
MF New Zealand Ricki Herbert 25 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 27 0 0 0
MF England Paul Dougherty 10 (11) 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 12 (11) 2 0 0
MF England Paul Butler 17 (1) 2 0 (1) 0 3 0 0 0 20 (2) 2 0 0
MF Scotland Danny Crainie 13 0 0 0 1(1) 0 0 0 14 (1) 0 2 0
MF Republic of Ireland Derek Ryan 6(4) 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 8 (4) 1 0 0
MF Republic of Ireland Martin Bayly 2(1) 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 (1) 0 0 0
FW England Mark Buckland 31(4) 5 2 0 4 0 0 0 37(4) 5 1 0
FW England Tommy Langley 22(1) 4 2 0 2(1) 0 0 0 26(2) 4 0 0
FW England Tony Evans 20(3) 5 1 0 3 1 0 0 24(3) 6 0 0
FW England Campbell Chapman 18(2) 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 24(3) 2 1 0
FW England Ray Hankin 9(1) 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9(1) 1 0 0
FW Scotland Jim Melrose 6(1) 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 8(1) 4 0 0
FW England Peter Eastoe 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 0
FW England Andy King 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 2 0
FW England Steve Biggins 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0
FW England Cavern Campbell 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
FW England Steve Blackwell 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0
FW England Graham Rodger 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Source: Wolverhampton Wanderers: The Complete Record[22][23]

Discover more about Players related topics

Goalkeeper (association football)

Goalkeeper (association football)

The goal-keeper is a position in association football. It is the most specialised position in the sport. The goalkeeper's main role is to stop the opposing team from scoring. This is accomplished by having the goalkeeper move into the trajectory of the ball to either catch it or direct it further from the vicinity of the goal line. Within the penalty area goalkeepers are allowed to use their hands, giving them the sole rights on the field to handle the ball. The goalkeeper is indicated by wearing a different coloured kit from their teammates and opposition.

Defender (association football)

Defender (association football)

In the sport of association football, a defender is an outfield position whose primary role is to stop attacks during the game and prevent the opposition from scoring.

Midfielder

Midfielder

A midfielder is an outfield position in association football. Midfielders may play an exclusively defensive role, breaking up attacks, and are in that case known as defensive midfielders. As central midfielders often go across boundaries, with mobility and passing ability, they are often referred to as deep-lying midfielders, play-makers, box-to-box midfielders, or holding midfielders. There are also attacking midfielders with limited defensive assignments.

Forward (association football)

Forward (association football)

Forwards are outfield positions in an association football team who play the furthest up the pitch and are therefore most responsible for scoring goals as well as assisting them. As with any attacking player, the role of the forward relies heavily on being able to create space for attack.

FA Cup

FA Cup

The Football Association Challenge Cup, more commonly known as the FA Cup, is an annual knockout football competition in men's domestic English football. First played during the 1871–72 season, it is the oldest national football competition in the world. It is organised by and named after The Football Association. Since 2015, it has been known as The Emirates FA Cup after its headline sponsor. A concurrent women's tournament is also held, the Women's FA Cup.

EFL Cup

EFL Cup

The EFL Cup, currently known as the Carabao Cup for sponsorship reasons, is an annual knockout competition and major trophy in men's domestic football in England. Organised by the English Football League (EFL), it is open to any club within the top four levels of the English football league system – 92 clubs in total – comprising the top-level Premier League, and the three divisions of the English Football League's own league competition.

England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

John Burridge

John Burridge

John Burridge, nicknamed Budgie, is an English former goalkeeper who is now working with Indian Super League club Kerala Blasters as their goalkeeping consultant and senior goalkeeping coach for their goalkeeping academy. In his senior career he played for 29 clubs, 18 of them in the Football League, in a career that lasted nearly 30 years. Overall, Burridge played 768 league games in the English and Scottish leagues, and several more at non-league level.

John Humphrey (footballer)

John Humphrey (footballer)

John Humphrey is an English former professional footballer who played as a defender from 1979 until 1997.

Republic of Ireland

Republic of Ireland

Ireland, also known as the Republic of Ireland, is a country in north-western Europe consisting of 26 of the 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, on the eastern side of the island. Around 2.1 million of the country's population of 5.13 million people resides in the Greater Dublin Area. The sovereign state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, St George's Channel to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east. It is a unitary, parliamentary republic. The legislature, the Oireachtas, consists of a lower house, Dáil Éireann; an upper house, Seanad Éireann; and an elected President who serves as the largely ceremonial head of state, but with some important powers and duties. The head of government is the Taoiseach, who is elected by the Dáil and appointed by the President; the Taoiseach in turn appoints other government ministers.

John Pender (footballer)

John Pender (footballer)

John Patrick Pender is an Irish retired professional footballer who played as a central defender. He is one of only two Burnley captains to have led the side to two promotions, the other being Martin Dobson.

David Barnes (footballer)

David Barnes (footballer)

David Barnes is an English former footballer who played as a left-back in the Football League for Coventry City, Ipswich Town, Wolverhampton Wanderers, Aldershot, Sheffield United, Watford and Colchester United. He was forced to retire in 1997 following a succession of injuries. Barnes represented England at under-19 level.

Transfers

In

Date Player From Fee
26 June 1984 England Tony Evans Crystal Palace Free
6 July 1984 England Tommy Langley Coventry City Free
22 August 1984 England Alan Ainscow Eastern Honk Kong Undisclosed
25 August 1984 England Tim Flowers Wolves Under 18 Free
25 August 1984 England Derek Ryan (footballer) Wolves Under 18 Free
27 September 1984 England Scott Barrett Ilkeston Town Undisclosed
3 October 1984 England David Barnes Ipswich Town £44,000
30 October 1984 New Zealand Ricki Herbert Sydney Olympic Free
29 December 1984 England Dayid Heywood Wolves Under 18 Free
23 February 1984 England Campbell Chapman Wolves Under 18 Free
10 January 1985 England Mick Coady Sydney Olympic Undisclosed
31 January 1985 England Andy King SC Cambuur Undisclosed
23 February 1985 England Cavern Chapman Wolves Under 18 Free
8 March 1985 England Peter Zelem Chester City £15,000
9 March 1985 England Ryan Hankin Peterborough United Free
20 April 1985 England Steve Blackwell Wolves Under 18 Free

Source: Wolves Complete History: Transfers A-Z[47]

Out

Date Player To Fee
4 July 1984 England Melvyn Eves Sheffield United Free
13 August 1984 England Kenny Hibbitt Coventry City Undisclosed
24 August 1984 England Steve Mardenborough Swansea City Free
24 August 1984 England Wayne Clarke Birmingham City £80,000
12 September 1984 England Tony Towner Charlton Athletic £15,000
26 October 1984 England John Burridge Sheffield United Undisclosed
22 November 1984 England Geoff Palmer Burnley Undisclosed
19 January 1985 England Alan Dodd Stoke City Released
May 1985 England Cavern Chapman - Released
May 1985 England Steve Blackwell - Released

Source: Wolves Complete History: Transfers A-Z[47]

Loans in

Start date Player From End date
13 September 1984 Scotland Jim Melrose Celtic Unknown
22 September 1984 England Nicky Sinclair Oldham Athletic Unknown
18 January 1985 England Peter Zelem Chester City 8 March 1985 (Made Permanent)
8 February 1985 England Peter Eastoe West Bromwich Albion Unknown
9 March 1985 England Steve Biggins Derby County Unknown

Source: Wolves Complete History: Transfers A-Z[47]

Loans out

Start date Player From End date
21 September 1984 England John Burridge Derby County 26 October 1984
21 January 1985 Republic of Ireland Martin Bayly Coventry City Made Permanent
7 February 1985 England Paul Dougherty Torquay United
18 January 1985 England Paul Butler Hereford Made Permanent
27 February 1985 England Tony Evans Bolton Wanderers
8 March 1985 England Tommy Langley Aldershot
13 March 1985 Scotland Danny Crainie Blackpool

Source: Wolves Complete History: Transfers A-Z[47]

Discover more about Transfers related topics

England

England

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to its west and Scotland to its north. The Irish Sea lies northwest and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. It is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Crystal Palace F.C.

Crystal Palace F.C.

Crystal Palace Football Club is a professional football club based in Selhurst in the Borough of Croydon, South London, England, who compete in the Premier League, the highest level of English football. Although formally created as a professional outfit in 1905, the club's origins can be traced as far back as 1861, when an amateur Crystal Palace football team was established at the Crystal Palace Exhibition building. This has led to claims by the club that Crystal Palace should be recognised as the oldest professional football club in the world, after historians discovered a lineage through the Crystal Palace Company. Both the amateur and professional clubs played inside the grounds of the Palace, with the professional club using the FA Cup Final stadium for its home games until 1915, when they were forced to leave due to the outbreak of the First World War. In 1924, they moved to their current home at Selhurst Park.

Tommy Langley

Tommy Langley

Thomas William Langley is an English retired footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s as a striker. He is currently one of the hosts of Matchnight Live on Chelsea TV.

Coventry City F.C.

Coventry City F.C.

Coventry City Football Club is a professional association football club based in Coventry, West Midlands, England. The team currently compete in the Championship, the second tier of the English football league system. The club is nicknamed the Sky Blues because of the colour of their home strip.

Alan Ainscow

Alan Ainscow

Alan Ainscow is an English former professional footballer who made more than 450 appearances in the Football League.

Tim Flowers

Tim Flowers

Timothy David Flowers is an English football manager and former player who recently was the manager of Stratford Town.

Scott Barrett (footballer)

Scott Barrett (footballer)

Scott Barrett is an English former footballer who played as a goalkeeper in the Football League for Wolverhampton Wanderers, Stoke City, Colchester United, Stockport County, Gillingham, Cambridge United and Leyton Orient.

Ilkeston Town F.C.

Ilkeston Town F.C.

Ilkeston Town Football Club is a football club based in Ilkeston, Derbyshire, England. They currently play in the Southern League Premier Division Central.

David Barnes (footballer)

David Barnes (footballer)

David Barnes is an English former footballer who played as a left-back in the Football League for Coventry City, Ipswich Town, Wolverhampton Wanderers, Aldershot, Sheffield United, Watford and Colchester United. He was forced to retire in 1997 following a succession of injuries. Barnes represented England at under-19 level.

Ipswich Town F.C.

Ipswich Town F.C.

Ipswich Town Football Club is a professional association football club based in Ipswich, Suffolk, England. They play in League One, the third tier of the English football league system.

New Zealand

New Zealand

New Zealand is an island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. It consists of two main landmasses—the North Island and the South Island —and over 700 smaller islands. It is the sixth-largest island country by area, covering 268,021 square kilometres (103,500 sq mi). New Zealand is about 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the islands of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. The country's varied topography and sharp mountain peaks, including the Southern Alps, owe much to tectonic uplift and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, and its most populous city is Auckland.

Ricki Herbert

Ricki Herbert

Ricki Lloyd Herbert is a New Zealand former footballer and manager. He is the current technical director at Cambridge FC.

Source: "1984–85 Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C. Season", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, January 28th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1984–85_Wolverhampton_Wanderers_F.C._Season.

Enjoying Wikiz?

Enjoying Wikiz?

Get our FREE extension now!

References
  1. ^ "On this day: New Wolves owners axe manager". www.expressandstar.com. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  2. ^ "Decade of Decline: Wolverhampton Wanderers in the 1980s". footballwhispers.com. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2023.
  3. ^ Cusack, Richard (31 December 2020). "Former Aston Villa and Wolves manager Tommy Docherty dies aged 92". BirminghamLive. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  4. ^ "Tommy Docherty: The irrepressible Scot who always had a one-liner at the ready". www.expressandstar.com. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  5. ^ Staplehurst, Jack (31 December 2020). "Inside Tommy Docherty's affair with Man Utd physio's wife which got him sacked". Dailystar.co.uk. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  6. ^ 1981 - Mike Hill Interviews Sydney Olympic Coach Tommy Docherty, retrieved 26 January 2023
  7. ^ "Gray reflects on the original big deal". www.expressandstar.com. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  8. ^ Wolverhampton-Nottigham Forest 1-0 League Cup Final 1979-80 HQ, retrieved 26 January 2023
  9. ^ "The night Wolves became 'champions of the world' against Honved | Nick Miller". the Guardian. 13 December 2014. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  10. ^ "From 1958 to 2010 – What Molineux could have been". www.expressandstar.com. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  11. ^ "From 1958 to 2010 – What Molineux could have been". www.expressandstar.com. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  12. ^ "Wolves' bankruptcy in 1982, 40 years on: How former players are still giving something back in old gold and black". Sky Sports. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  13. ^ "Decade of Decline: Wolverhampton Wanderers in the 1980s". footballwhispers.com. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  14. ^ 1972 UEFA Cup Final - Spurs 3 Wolves 2 (on agg), retrieved 26 January 2023
  15. ^ "Wolves' bankruptcy in 1982, 40 years on: How former players are still giving something back in old gold and black". Sky Sports. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  16. ^ a b "Decade of Decline: Wolverhampton Wanderers in the 1980s". footballwhispers.com. 22 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  17. ^ Wollaston, Steve (13 March 2013). "Nostalgia gallery: Wayne Clarke". BirminghamLive. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  18. ^ "User account". infoweb.newsbank.com. Retrieved 27 January 2023.
  19. ^ "Flying winger Tony 'Tiger' Towner immortalised in children's TV programme". In parallel lines. 5 March 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  20. ^ Hawkins, Kirstie (2022). A marriage made in football. Amazon. pp. 115–116. ISBN 9798839490499.
  21. ^ a b "1984/85 Canon League Second Division". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 23 January 2023.
  22. ^ a b Matthews, Tony (2008). Wolverhampton Wanderers: The Complete Record. Derby: Breedon Books. ISBN 978-1-85983-632-3.
  23. ^ a b "Appearances & Scorers 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 24 January 2023.
  24. ^ "Tim Flowers | SaintsPlayers.co.uk". Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  25. ^ "Wolves Heroes » Blog Archive » Doc Failed To Cure Wolves' Ills". Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  26. ^ "Sheffield United (H) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  27. ^ "Leeds United (a) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  28. ^ "Manchester City (H) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  29. ^ "Charlton Athletic (H) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  30. ^ "Middlesbrough (a) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  31. ^ "Barnsley (a) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  32. ^ "John Burridge Article". S24SU Forum | Sheffield United Community. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  33. ^ Admin (4 January 2021). "Ricki Herbert: 'Inspirational' Docherty helped teach me how to coach". Ricki Herbert Football Academy. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  34. ^ "Grimsby Town (a) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  35. ^ "Wimbledon (H) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  36. ^ "Fulham (a) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  37. ^ "From fan to a Molineux great, Geoff Palmer played in every division for Wolves". www.expressandstar.com. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  38. ^ "Notts County (a) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  39. ^ "Transfers". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  40. ^ "Transfers". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  41. ^ "Brighton & Hove Albion (a) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  42. ^ "Huddersfield Town (H) 1984/85". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  43. ^ Howell, Bill (22 February 2013). "Wolves are haunted by the spectre of 1985". BirminghamLive. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  44. ^ "Bradford City FC stadium fire | 11th May 1985 | Fire Brigades Union". www.fbu.org.uk. Retrieved 25 January 2023.
  45. ^ "Wolves Heroes » Blog Archive » Doc Failed To Cure Wolves' Ills". Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  46. ^ "Wolves Heroes » Blog Archive » Doc's Orders Were A Bitter Pill". Retrieved 26 January 2023.
  47. ^ a b c d "Transfers A". Wolverhampton Wanderers. Retrieved 24 January 2023.

The content of this page is based on the Wikipedia article written by contributors..
The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence & the media files are available under their respective licenses; additional terms may apply.
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use & Privacy Policy.
Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization & is not affiliated to WikiZ.com.