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1920 United States House of Representatives elections

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1920 United States House of Representatives elections

← 1918 November 2, 1920[a] 1922 →

All 435 seats in the United States House of Representatives
218 seats needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
  FrederickHGillett.jpg Champ Clark, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left (cropped).jpg
Leader Frederick Gillett Champ Clark
(lost re-election)
Party Republican Democratic
Leader since May 19, 1919 March 4, 1909
Leader's seat Massachusetts 2nd Missouri 9th
(lost reelection)
Last election 240 seats 192 seats
Seats won 303[b] 131
Seat change Increase 63 Decrease 61
Popular vote 14,803,673 8,903,730
Percentage 58.82% 35.38%
Swing Increase 5.56% Decrease 7.77%

  Third party Fourth party
 
Party Socialist Prohibition
Last election 1 seat 1 seat
Seats won 1 0
Seat change Steady Decrease 1
Popular vote 648,577 176,811
Percentage 2.58% 0.70%
Swing Decrease 0.64% Decrease 0.25%

  Fifth party
 
Party Independent
Last election 1 seat
Seats won 1 [c]
Seat change Steady

US House 1920.svg
Results:
     Democratic hold      Democratic gain
     Republican hold      Republican gain
     Socialist gain
     Independent gain

Speaker before election

Frederick Gillett
Republican

Elected Speaker

Frederick Gillett
Republican

The 1920 United States House of Representatives elections were elections for the United States House of Representatives to elect members to serve in the 67th United States Congress. They were held for the most part on November 2, 1920, while Maine held theirs on September 13. They coincided with the election of President Warren G. Harding, the first time that women in all states were allowed to vote in federal elections after the passage of the 19th Amendment.

The incumbent Democratic administration of Woodrow Wilson lost popularity after the conclusion of World War I in 1918, as American voters hoped to return to isolationism and avoid military conflict in the future. Heedless of the prevailing national mood, Wilson advocated American leadership in a new international order under the League of Nations, alienated voters of German and Irish ancestry, and constantly struggled with a Congress controlled by the opposition Republican Party. Harding and the Republicans promised a new start for the nation and a disassociation from Europe's political troubles that most voters found appealing. As a result, the Republicans picked up 63 seats in the House of Representatives, with most of the gains coming from Democratic-leaning districts in the big industrial cities and the border states. Many of these districts elected Republican representatives for the only time in decades, and House Democratic leader Champ Clark was among those who lost reelection. Although the South remained solidly Democratic for the most part, the Republicans secured more than 90% of the seats outside the South, which gave them their largest majority of the 20th century and as of 2023, their greatest number of seats ever. The 67th Congress is the most recent in which the Republican Party won greater than a two-thirds majority of seats in either chamber.

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United States House of Representatives

United States House of Representatives

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, with the Senate being the upper chamber. Together, they comprise the national bicameral legislature of the United States.

67th United States Congress

67th United States Congress

The 67th United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1921, to March 4, 1923, during the first two years of Warren Harding's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the 1910 United States census.

President of the United States

President of the United States

The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

Warren G. Harding

Warren G. Harding

Warren Gamaliel Harding was the 29th president of the United States, serving from 1921 until his death in 1923. A member of the Republican Party, he was one of the most popular sitting U.S. presidents. After his death, a number of scandals were exposed, including Teapot Dome, as well as an extramarital affair with Nan Britton, which diminished his reputation.

Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution

The Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the United States and its states from denying the right to vote to citizens of the United States on the basis of sex, in effect recognizing the right of women to a vote. The amendment was the culmination of a decades-long movement for women's suffrage in the United States, at both the state and national levels, and was part of the worldwide movement towards women's suffrage and part of the wider women's rights movement. The first women's suffrage amendment was introduced in Congress in 1878. However, a suffrage amendment did not pass the House of Representatives until May 21, 1919, which was quickly followed by the Senate, on June 4, 1919. It was then submitted to the states for ratification, achieving the requisite 36 ratifications to secure adoption, and thereby go into effect, on August 18, 1920. The Nineteenth Amendment's adoption was certified on August 26, 1920.

Woodrow Wilson

Woodrow Wilson

Thomas Woodrow Wilson was an American politician and academic who served as the 28th president of the United States from 1913 to 1921. A member of the Democratic Party, Wilson served as the president of Princeton University and as the governor of New Jersey before winning the 1912 presidential election. As president, Wilson changed the nation's economic policies and led the United States into World War I in 1917. He was the leading architect of the League of Nations, and his progressive stance on foreign policy came to be known as Wilsonianism.

World War I

World War I

World War I or the First World War, often abbreviated as WWI, was one of the deadliest global conflicts in history. It was fought between two coalitions, the Allies and the Central Powers. Fighting occurred throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, the Pacific, and parts of Asia. An estimated 9 million soldiers were killed in combat, plus another 23 million wounded, while 5 million civilians died as a result of military action, hunger, and disease. Millions more died as a result of genocide, while the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic was exacerbated by the movement of combatants during the war.

Isolationism

Isolationism

Isolationism is a political philosophy advocating a national foreign policy that opposes involvement in the political affairs, and especially the wars, of other countries. Thus, isolationism fundamentally advocates neutrality and opposes entanglement in military alliances and mutual defense pacts. In its purest form, isolationism opposes all commitments to foreign countries including treaties and trade agreements. This distinguishes isolationism from non-interventionism, which also advocates military neutrality but does not necessarily oppose international commitments and treaties in general.

League of Nations

League of Nations

The League of Nations was the first worldwide intergovernmental organisation whose principal mission was to maintain world peace. It was founded on 10 January 1920 by the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War. The main organization ceased operations on 20 April 1946 but many of its components were relocated into the new United Nations.

Champ Clark

Champ Clark

James Beauchamp Clark was an American politician and attorney who represented Missouri in the United States House of Representatives and served as Speaker of the House from 1911 to 1919.

Election summaries

131 1 303
Democratic [d] Republican[b]

Source: Election Statistics - Office of the Clerk

House seats
Democratic
30.11%
Republican[b]
69.66%
Socialist
0.23%
Seats by party holding plurality in state    .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  80+% Democratic    80+% Republican      60+% to 80% Democratic    60+% to 80% Republican      Up to 60% Democratic    Up to 60% Republican
Seats by party holding plurality in state
  80+% Democratic
  80+% Republican
  60+% to 80% Democratic
  60+% to 80% Republican
  Up to 60% Democratic
  Up to 60% Republican
Net gain in party representation      6+ Democratic gain    6+ Republican gain      3-5 Democratic gain    3-5 Republican gain      1-2 Democratic gain    1-2 Republican gain      no net change
Net gain in party representation
  6+ Democratic gain
  6+ Republican gain
  3-5 Democratic gain
  3-5 Republican gain
  1-2 Democratic gain
  1-2 Republican gain
  no net change

Special elections

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Virginia 4 Walter A. Watson Democratic 1912 Incumbent died December 24, 1919.
New member elected April 27, 1920.
Democratic hold.
Virginia 5 Edward W. Saunders Democratic 1906 (special) Incumbent resigned February 29, 1920 to join the Supreme Court of Virginia.
New member elected June 1, 1920.
Democratic hold.
Michigan 13 Charles A. Nichols Republican 1914 Incumbent died April 25, 1920.
New member elected November 2, 1920.
Republican hold.
New Jersey 1 William J. Browning Republican 1911 (special) Incumbent died March 24, 1920.
New member elected November 2, 1920.
Republican hold.
New York 14 Fiorello La Guardia Republican 1916 Incumbent resigned December 31, 1919.
New member elected November 2, 1920.
Republican hold.
New York 26 Edmund Platt Republican 1912 Incumbent resigned June 7, 1920 to join the Federal Reserve Board.
New member elected November 2, 1920.
Republican hold.
  • Green tickY Hamilton Fish III (Republican) 63.6%
  • Rosslyn M. Cox (Democratic) 33.2%
  • James C. Hogan (Socialist) 3.2%[6]
Pennsylvania 3 J. Hampton Moore Republican 1906 (special) Incumbent resigned January 4, 1920 when elected Mayor of Philadelphia.
New member elected November 2, 1920.
Republican hold.
  • Green tickY Harry C. Ransley (Republican) 76.7%
  • Joseph Hagerty (Democratic) 18.6%
  • Ed Maurer (Socialist) 4.4%
  • Godfrey Stringer (Prohibition) 0.4%[7]
Alabama 5 James T. Heflin Democratic 1904 Incumbent resigned November 1, 1920 when elected U.S. senator.
New member elected December 14, 1920.
Democratic hold.

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List of special elections to the United States House of Representatives

List of special elections to the United States House of Representatives

Below is a list of special elections to the United States House of Representatives. Such elections are called by state governors to fill vacancies that occur when a member of the House of Representatives dies or resigns before the biennial general election. Winners of these elections serve the remainder of the term and are usually candidates in the next general election for their districts.

Patrick H. Drewry

Patrick H. Drewry

Patrick Henry Drewry was a Virginia lawyer and Democratic politician who served in the United States House of Representatives and state senate.

Edward W. Saunders

Edward W. Saunders

Edward Watts Saunders was a Virginia lawyer, politician and judge, who served as Speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates, U.S. Representative and justice of the Supreme Court of Virginia.

Supreme Court of Virginia

Supreme Court of Virginia

The Supreme Court of Virginia is the highest court in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It primarily hears direct appeals in civil cases from the trial-level city and county circuit courts, as well as the criminal law, family law and administrative law cases that are initially appealed to the Court of Appeals of Virginia. It is one of the oldest continuously active judicial bodies in the United States. It was known as the Supreme Court of Appeals until 1970, when it was renamed the Supreme Court of Virginia because it has original as well as appellate jurisdiction.

Rorer A. James

Rorer A. James

Rorer Abraham James was a lawyer, newspaperman and politician from Virginia. As a politician, he served in the Virginia House, Senate, and as United States Representative.

Michigan's 13th congressional district

Michigan's 13th congressional district

Michigan's 13th congressional district is a United States congressional district in Wayne County, Michigan. It is currently represented by Democrat Shri Thanedar.

Charles Archibald Nichols

Charles Archibald Nichols

Charles Archibald Nichols was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

Clarence J. McLeod

Clarence J. McLeod

Clarence John McLeod was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan who served as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

New Jersey's 1st congressional district

New Jersey's 1st congressional district

New Jersey's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of New Jersey. The district, which includes Camden and South Jersey suburbs of Philadelphia, has been represented by Democrat Donald Norcross since November 2014. It is among the most reliably Democratic districts in New Jersey, as it is mainly made up of Democratic-dominated Camden County.

Francis F. Patterson Jr.

Francis F. Patterson Jr.

Francis Ford Patterson Jr. was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jersey's 1st congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1920 to 1927.

New York's 14th congressional district

New York's 14th congressional district

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Fiorello La Guardia

Fiorello La Guardia

Fiorello Henry La Guardia was an American attorney and politician who represented New York in the House of Representatives and served as the 99th Mayor of New York City from 1934 to 1945. Known for his irascible, energetic, and charismatic personality and diminutive, rotund stature, La Guardia is acclaimed as one of the greatest mayors in American history. A liberal member of the Republican Party, La Guardia was frequently cross-endorsed by parties other than his own, especially parties on the left under New York's electoral fusion laws.

Alabama

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Alabama 1 John McDuffie Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Alabama 2 S. Hubert Dent Jr. Democratic 1908 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Alabama 3 Henry B. Steagall Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Alabama 4 Fred L. Blackmon Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Alabama 5 James Thomas Heflin Democratic 1904 Incumbent resigned when elected U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Winner took seat December 14, 1920.
Alabama 6 William B. Oliver Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Alabama 7 Lilius B. Rainey Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Alabama 8 Edward B. Almon Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Alabama 9 George Huddleston Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Alabama 10 William B. Bankhead Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Alabama

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Alabama's 1st congressional district

Alabama's 1st congressional district

Alabama's 1st congressional district is a United States congressional district in Alabama, which elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives. It includes the entirety of Washington, Mobile, Baldwin, Escambia and Monroe counties, and also includes part of Clarke County. The largest city in the district is Mobile.

John McDuffie

John McDuffie

John McDuffie was a United States representative from Alabama and a United States district judge of the United States District Court for the Southern District of Alabama.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Alabama's 2nd congressional district

Alabama's 2nd congressional district

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S. Hubert Dent Jr.

S. Hubert Dent Jr.

Stanley Hubert Dent Jr. was a U.S. Representative from Alabama.

John R. Tyson

John R. Tyson

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Alabama's 3rd congressional district

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Henry B. Steagall

Henry B. Steagall

Henry Bascom Steagall was a United States representative from Alabama. He was chairman of the Committee on Banking and Currency and in 1933, he co-sponsored the Glass–Steagall Act with Carter Glass, an act that introduced banking reforms and established the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC). With Senator Robert F. Wagner, he co-sponsored the Wagner-Steagall National Housing Act of September 1937 which created the United States Housing Authority.

Alabama's 4th congressional district

Alabama's 4th congressional district

Alabama's 4th congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in Alabama, which elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives. It encompasses the counties of Franklin, Colbert, Marion, Lamar, Fayette, Walker, Winston, Cullman, Lawrence, Marshall, Etowah, and DeKalb. It also includes parts of Jackson and Tuscaloosa counties, as well as parts of the Decatur Metropolitan Area and the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area.

Fred L. Blackmon

Fred L. Blackmon

Fred Leonard Blackmon was a U.S. Representative from Alabama.

Arizona

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Arizona at-large Carl Hayden Democratic 1911 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Carl Hayden (Democratic) 57.8%
  • James A. Dunseath (Republican) 42.2%

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Arkansas

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Arkansas 1 Thaddeus H. Caraway Democratic 1912 Incumbent retired to run for U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Arkansas 2 William A. Oldfield Democratic 1908 Incumbent re-elected.
Arkansas 3 John N. Tillman Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John N. Tillman (Democratic) 53.3%
  • John I. Worthington (Republican) 46.7%
Arkansas 4 Otis Wingo Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Otis Wingo (Democratic) 64.1%
  • W. H. Dunblazier (Republican) 35.9%
Arkansas 5 Henderson M. Jacoway Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Arkansas 6 Samuel M. Taylor Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Arkansas 7 William S. Goodwin Democratic 1910 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.

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List of United States representatives from Arkansas

List of United States representatives from Arkansas

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Arkansas's 1st congressional district

Arkansas's 1st congressional district

Arkansas's 1st congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in eastern Arkansas that elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives. It is currently represented by Republican Rick Crawford. With a Cook Partisan Voting Index rating of R+22, it is the most Republican district in Arkansas, a state with an all-Republican congressional delegation.

Thaddeus H. Caraway

Thaddeus H. Caraway

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William J. Driver

William J. Driver

William Joshua Driver was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from Arkansas.

Arkansas's 2nd congressional district

Arkansas's 2nd congressional district

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Arkansas's 3rd congressional district

Arkansas's 3rd congressional district

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John N. Tillman

John N. Tillman

John Newton Tillman was a U.S. Representative from Arkansas. In the Arkansas State Senate he proposed the Separate Coach Law of 1891, a Jim Crow law to segregate African American passengers. The bill became law.

Arkansas's 4th congressional district

Arkansas's 4th congressional district

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Otis Wingo

Otis Wingo

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California

District Incumbent Party First elected Result Opponent
California 1 Clarence F. Lea Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Clarence F. Lea (Democratic) 61.7%
  • C. A. Bodwell Jr. (Republican) 33.3%
  • A. K. Gifford (Socialist) 5.0%
California 2 John E. Raker Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
California 3 Charles F. Curry Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Charles F. Curry (Republican) 74.7%
  • J. W. Struckenbruck (Democratic) 20.4%
  • Miles William Beck (Socialist) 4.9%
California 4 Julius Kahn Republican 1898 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Julius Kahn (Republican) 84.6%
  • Milton Harlan (Socialist) 15.4%
California 5 John I. Nolan Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John I. Nolan (Republican) 81.8%
  • Thomas Conway (Socialist) 18.2%
California 6 John A. Elston Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
California 7 Henry E. Barbour Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
California 8 Hugh S. Hersman Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
California 9 Charles H. Randall Prohibition 1914 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
California 10 Henry Z. Osborne Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
California 11 William Kettner Democratic 1912 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.

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1920 United States House of Representatives elections in California

1920 United States House of Representatives elections in California

The United States House of Representatives elections in California, 1920 was an election for California's delegation to the United States House of Representatives, which occurred as part of the general election of the House of Representatives on November 2, 1920. Republicans picked up two Democratic-held districts and defeated the lone Prohibition Party incumbent.

California's 1st congressional district

California's 1st congressional district

California's 1st congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in California. Doug LaMalfa, a Republican, has represented the district since January 2013. Currently, it encompasses the northeastern part of the state. Since the 2022 election, it includes the counties of Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Lassen, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, Sutter, and Tehama, and most of Yuba County. The largest cities in the district are Chico, Redding, and Yuba City.

Clarence F. Lea

Clarence F. Lea

Clarence Frederick Lea was an American lawyer and politician who served 16 terms as a U.S. Representative from California from 1917 to 1949.

1916 United States House of Representatives elections in California

1916 United States House of Representatives elections in California

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California's 2nd congressional district

California's 2nd congressional district

California's 2nd congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in California. Jared Huffman, a Democrat, has represented the district since January 2013. Currently, it encompasses the North Coast region and adjacent areas of the state. It stretches from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Oregon border, and includes all of the portions of Highway 101 within California that are north of San Francisco, excepting a stretch in Sonoma County. The district consists of Marin, Mendocino, Humboldt, Del Norte, and Trinity Counties, plus portions of Sonoma County. Cities in the district include San Rafael, Petaluma, Novato, Windsor, Healdsburg, Ukiah, Fort Bragg, Fortuna, Eureka, Arcata, McKinleyville, Crescent City, and northwestern Santa Rosa.

John E. Raker

John E. Raker

John Edward Raker was an American lawyer and politician who served as a Democratic Party Congressional representative for California, serving eight terms from 1911 to 1926.

1910 United States House of Representatives elections in California

1910 United States House of Representatives elections in California

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California's 3rd congressional district

California's 3rd congressional district

California's 3rd congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in California. It includes the northern Sierra Nevada and northeastern suburbs of Sacramento, stretching south to Death Valley. It encompasses Alpine, Inyo, Mono, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, and Sierra counties, as well as parts of El Dorado, Sacramento, and Yuba counties. It includes the Sacramento suburbs of Roseville, Folsom, Orangevale, Rocklin, and Lincoln, and the mountain towns of Quincy, South Lake Tahoe, Truckee, Mammoth Lakes, and Bishop. The district is represented by Republican Kevin Kiley.

Charles F. Curry

Charles F. Curry

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1912 United States House of Representatives elections in California

1912 United States House of Representatives elections in California

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California's 4th congressional district

California's 4th congressional district

California's 4th congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in California. The district is located in the northwestern part of the state, and includes all of Lake County and Napa County, most of Yolo County, and parts of Solano County and Sonoma County. Major cities in the district include Davis, Woodland, Napa, Vacaville, and most of Santa Rosa. The new 4th district is solidly Democratic, and is represented by Mike Thompson.

1898 United States House of Representatives elections in California

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Colorado

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Colorado 1 William Newell Vaile Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Colorado 2 Charles Bateman Timberlake Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Colorado 3 Guy Urban Hardy Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Colorado 4 Edward Thomas Taylor Democratic 1908 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Colorado

List of United States representatives from Colorado

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Colorado. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Colorado. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Colorado's 1st congressional district

Colorado's 1st congressional district

Colorado's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Colorado based primarily in the City and County of Denver in the central part of the state. The district includes all of the City and County of Denver, and the Denver enclaves of Glendale and Holly Hills.

Benjamin C. Hilliard

Benjamin C. Hilliard

Benjamin Clark Hilliard was an American lawyer, jurist, and politician. He served two terms as a U.S. Representative from Colorado, and was a two-time chief justice of the Supreme Court of Colorado.

Colorado's 2nd congressional district

Colorado's 2nd congressional district

Colorado's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Colorado. The district is located in the north-central part of the state and encompasses the northwestern suburbs of Denver including Boulder and Fort Collins. The district also includes the mountain towns of Vail, Granby, Steamboat Springs, and Idaho Springs. Redistricting in 2011 moved Larimer County, including the cities of Fort Collins and Loveland, to the 2nd from the 4th district. Meanwhile, redistricting in 2021 moved Loveland back to the 4th district and Broomfield and western Jefferson County to the 7th district.

Colorado's 3rd congressional district

Colorado's 3rd congressional district

Colorado's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Colorado. It takes in most of the rural Western Slope in the state's western third portion, with a tendril in the south taking in some of the southern portions of the Eastern Plains. It includes the cities of Grand Junction, Durango, Aspen, Glenwood Springs, Ignacio, and Pueblo. The district is currently represented by Republican Lauren Boebert.

Colorado's 4th congressional district

Colorado's 4th congressional district

Colorado's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Colorado. Located in the eastern part of the state, the district encompasses most of the rural Eastern Plains as well as the larger Colorado Front Range cities of Loveland, Highlands Ranch, Castle Rock, and Parker.

Connecticut

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Connecticut 1 Augustine Lonergan Democratic 1916 Incumbent retired to run for U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Connecticut 2 Richard P. Freeman Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Connecticut 3 John Q. Tilson Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Connecticut 4 Schuyler Merritt Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Connecticut 5 James P. Glynn Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Connecticut

List of United States representatives from Connecticut

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Connecticut. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Connecticut. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Connecticut's 1st congressional district

Connecticut's 1st congressional district

Connecticut's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Connecticut. Located in the north-central part of the state, the district is anchored by the state capital of Hartford. It encompasses much of central Connecticut and includes towns within Hartford, Litchfield, and Middlesex counties.

Augustine Lonergan

Augustine Lonergan

Augustine Lonergan was a U.S. Senator and Representative from Connecticut. He was a member of the Democratic Party. He served as a senator from 1933 to 1939.

1920 United States Senate election in Connecticut

1920 United States Senate election in Connecticut

The 1920 United States Senate election in Connecticut was held on November 2, 1920.

E. Hart Fenn

E. Hart Fenn

Edward Hart Fenn was a U.S. Representative from Connecticut.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Prohibition Party

Prohibition Party

The Prohibition Party (PRO) is a political party in the United States known for its historic opposition to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages and as an integral part of the temperance movement. It is the oldest existing third party in the United States and the third-longest active party.

Connecticut's 2nd congressional district

Connecticut's 2nd congressional district

Connecticut's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Connecticut. Located in the eastern part of the state, the district includes all of New London County, Tolland County, and Windham County, along with parts of Hartford, Middlesex, and New Haven counties. Principal cities include Enfield, Norwich, New London, and Groton.

Richard P. Freeman

Richard P. Freeman

Richard Patrick Freeman was a U.S. Representative from Connecticut.

Socialist Labor Party of America

Socialist Labor Party of America

The Socialist Labor Party (SLP) is the first socialist political party in the United States, established in 1876.

Connecticut's 3rd congressional district

Connecticut's 3rd congressional district

Connecticut's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Connecticut. Located in the central part of the state, the district includes the city of New Haven and its surrounding suburbs.

John Q. Tilson

John Q. Tilson

John Quillin Tilson was an American politician. A Republican, he represented Connecticut in the United States House of Representatives for almost 22 years and was House Majority leader for 6 years.

Delaware

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Delaware at-large Caleb R. Layton Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Caleb R. Layton (Republican) 55.7%
  • James R. Clements (Democratic) 43.0%
  • Robert A. Walker (Socialist) 1.1%
  • Howard T. Ennis (Independent) 0.2%

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Florida

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Florida 1 Herbert J. Drane Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Herbert J. Drane (Democratic) 78.1%
  • H. B. Jeffries (Republican) 14.0%
  • C. W. Hains (White Republican) 4.8%
  • C. W. Smith (Socialist) 3.2%
Florida 2 Frank Clark Democratic 1904 Incumbent re-elected.
Florida 3 John H. Smithwick Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Florida 4 William J. Sears Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Florida

List of United States representatives from Florida

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Florida. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Florida. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Florida's 1st congressional district

Florida's 1st congressional district

Florida's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Florida, covering the state's western Panhandle. It includes all of Escambia, Okaloosa, and Santa Rosa counties, and portions of Walton county. The district is anchored in Pensacola and also includes the large military bedroom communities and tourist destinations of Navarre and Fort Walton Beach and stretches along the Emerald Coast. The district is currently represented by Republican Matt Gaetz. With a Cook Partisan Voting Index rating of R+19, it is one of the most Republican districts in Florida.

Herbert J. Drane

Herbert J. Drane

Herbert Jackson Drane was a U.S. Representative from Florida.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Florida's 2nd congressional district

Florida's 2nd congressional district

Florida's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Florida. The district consists of the eastern part of the Florida Panhandle along with much of the Big Bend region along the Emerald Coast. It straddles both the Eastern and Central time zones. It is anchored in Tallahassee, the state capital, and includes Panama City. With 49% of its residents living in rural areas, it is the least urbanized district in the state, and voters are generally conservative. The district is represented by Republican Neal Dunn.

Frank Clark (politician)

Frank Clark (politician)

Frank Clark was an American lawyer and politician who served in public and private practice for some 50 years, including 20 years in the United States Congress.

1904 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida

1904 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida

The 1904 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida for three seats in the 59th Congress were held November 8, 1904, alongside the election for President and the election for governor.

Florida's 3rd congressional district

Florida's 3rd congressional district

Florida's 3rd congressional district is an electoral district of the United States House of Representatives located in Florida. It presently comprises a large section of northern Florida, including the entire counties of Alachua, Clay, Putnam, Bradford, and Union, along with the majority of Marion County. The cities of Gainesville and Palatka are in the district as well as part of Ocala. Some Jacksonville suburbs such as Middleburg, Green Cove Springs, and Orange Park are also in the district.

John H. Smithwick

John H. Smithwick

John Harris Smithwick was a U.S. Representative from Florida.

Florida's 4th congressional district

Florida's 4th congressional district

Florida's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in northeastern Florida, encompassing Nassau and parts of Duval and St. Johns counties. The district is currently represented by Republican Aaron Bean.

William J. Sears

William J. Sears

William Joseph Sears was a lawyer and U.S. Representative from Florida. A Democrat, he was an avowed white supremacist.

Georgia

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Georgia 1 James W. Overstreet Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 2 Frank Park Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 3 Charles R. Crisp Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 4 William C. Wright Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 5 William D. Upshaw Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 6 James W. Wise Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 7 Gordon Lee Democratic 1904 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Gordon Lee (Democratic) 99.6%
  • A.L Weaver (Republican) .4%
Georgia 8 Charles H. Brand Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 9 Thomas Montgomery Bell Democratic 1904 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 10 Carl Vinson Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 11 William C. Lankford Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Georgia 12 William W. Larsen Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Georgia

List of United States representatives from Georgia

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Georgia. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Georgia. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Georgia's 1st congressional district

Georgia's 1st congressional district

Georgia's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Georgia. It is currently represented by Republican Buddy Carter, though the district's boundaries were redrawn following the 2010 United States Census, which granted an additional congressional seat to Georgia. The first election using the new district boundaries were the 2012 congressional elections.

James W. Overstreet

James W. Overstreet

James Whetstone Overstreet was a U.S. Representative from Georgia.

James Overstreet

James Overstreet

James Overstreet was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina.

Georgia's 2nd congressional district

Georgia's 2nd congressional district

Georgia's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Georgia. The district is currently represented by Democrat Sanford D. Bishop, Jr.

Frank Park

Frank Park

Frank Park was an American politician, educator, lawyer and jurist from the state of Georgia.

Georgia's 3rd congressional district

Georgia's 3rd congressional district

Georgia's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Georgia. The district is currently represented by Republican Drew Ferguson. The district's boundaries have been redrawn following the 2010 census, which granted an additional congressional seat to Georgia. The first election using the new district boundaries were the 2012 congressional elections.

Charles R. Crisp

Charles R. Crisp

Charles Robert Crisp was a U.S. Representative from Georgia, son of Charles Frederick Crisp.

Georgia's 4th congressional district

Georgia's 4th congressional district

Georgia's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Georgia. The district is currently represented by Democrat Hank Johnson, though the district's boundaries have been redrawn following the 2010 census, which granted an additional congressional seat to Georgia. The first election using the new district boundaries were the 2012 congressional elections.

William C. Wright

William C. Wright

William Carter Wright was a U.S. Representative from Georgia.

Idaho

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Idaho 1 Burton L. French Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Idaho 2 Addison T. Smith Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Idaho

List of United States representatives from Idaho

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Idaho. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Idaho. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Idaho's 1st congressional district

Idaho's 1st congressional district

Idaho's 1st congressional district is one of two congressional districts in the U.S. state of Idaho. It comprises the western portion of the state. The 1st district is currently represented by Russ Fulcher, a Republican from Meridian, who was first elected in 2018, and re-elected in 2020 and 2022.

Burton L. French

Burton L. French

Burton Lee French was a congressman from Idaho. French served as a Republican in the House from 1903 to 1909, 1911 to 1915 and 1917 to 1933. With a combined 26 years in office, he remains the longest-serving U.S. House member in Idaho history.

Nell Kruegel Irion

Nell Kruegel Irion

Nell Cora Kruegel Irion (1877–1964) was an American politician and suffragette who served as superintendent of schools in Bonner County and was the first woman to run for Congress in Idaho.

Idaho's 2nd congressional district

Idaho's 2nd congressional district

Idaho's 2nd congressional district is one of two congressional districts in the U.S. state of Idaho, in the eastern portion of the state. Beginning with the 2012 election, the district expanded westward and now includes most of Boise, the state capital and largest city. The district is currently represented by Mike Simpson, a Republican of Idaho Falls. A former dentist in Blackfoot, he was first elected in 1998; the seat opened when his predecessor Mike Crapo successfully ran for the U.S. Senate.

Addison T. Smith

Addison T. Smith

Addison Taylor Smith was a congressman from Idaho. Smith served as a Republican in the U.S. House for ten terms, from 1913 to 1933.

Illinois

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Illinois 1 Martin B. Madden Republican 1904 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 2 James R. Mann Republican 1896 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 3 William W. Wilson Republican 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
  • Green tickY Elliott W. Sproul (Republican) 67.4%
  • Thomas M. Crane (Democratic) 28.1%
  • Kellam Foster (Socialist) 3.7%
  • George W. Stone (Independent) 0.8%
Illinois 4 John W. Rainey Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 5 Adolph J. Sabath Democratic 1906 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 6 James McAndrews Democratic 1912 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Illinois 7 Niels Juul Republican 1916 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
  • Green tickY M. Alfred Michaelson (Republican) 70.0%
  • William J. Cullerton (Democratic) 21.6%
  • Samuel Holland (Socialist) 7.6%
  • Robert M. Buck (Independent) 0.7%
Illinois 8 Thomas Gallagher Democratic 1908 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected. (?)
Democratic hold.
Illinois 9 Frederick A. Britten Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 10 Carl R. Chindblom Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 11 Ira C. Copley Republican 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 12 Charles Eugene Fuller Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 13 John C. McKenzie Republican 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 14 William J. Graham Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 15 Edward John King Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 16 Clifford Ireland Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 17 Frank L. Smith Republican 1918 Incumbent retired to run for U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Illinois 18 Joseph G. Cannon Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 19 William B. McKinley Republican 1914 Incumbent retired to run for U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Illinois 20 Henry T. Rainey Democratic 1902 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Illinois 21 Loren E. Wheeler Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 22 William A. Rodenberg Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 23 Edwin B. Brooks Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 24 Thomas Sutler Williams Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois 25 Edward E. Denison Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Illinois at-large Richard Yates Jr. Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
William E. Mason Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Illinois

List of United States representatives from Illinois

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Illinois. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Illinois. The list of names should be complete as of January 3, 2019, but other data may be incomplete. Illinois became the 21st state on December 3, 1818.

Illinois's 1st congressional district

Illinois's 1st congressional district

Illinois's first congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Illinois. Based in Cook County, the district includes much of the South Side of Chicago, and continues southwest to Joliet.

Martin B. Madden

Martin B. Madden

Martin Barnaby Madden was a U.S. Representative from Illinois. He belonged to the Republican Party. As of 2020, he is the last non-African American to serve as a representative for Illinois's 1st congressional district.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Illinois's 2nd congressional district

Illinois's 2nd congressional district

Illinois's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Illinois. Based in the south suburbs of Chicago, the district includes southern Cook county, eastern Will county, and Kankakee county, as well as the city of Chicago's far southeast side.

Illinois's 3rd congressional district

Illinois's 3rd congressional district

Illinois's 3rd congressional district includes part of Cook County, and has been represented by Democrat Delia Ramirez since January 3, 2023. The district was previously represented by Marie Newman from 2021 to 2023, Dan Lipinski from 2005 to 2021, and by Lipinski's father Bill from 1983 to 2005.

William Warfield Wilson

William Warfield Wilson

William Warfield Wilson was a U.S. Representative from Illinois.

Elliott W. Sproul

Elliott W. Sproul

Elliott Wilford Sproul was a U.S. Representative from Illinois.

Illinois's 4th congressional district

Illinois's 4th congressional district

The 4th congressional district of Illinois includes part of Cook County, and has been represented by Democrat Jesús "Chuy" García since January 2019.

Indiana

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Indiana 1 Oscar R. Luhring Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 2 Oscar E. Bland Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 3 James W. Dunbar Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 4 John S. Benham Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 5 Everett Sanders Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 6 Richard N. Elliott Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 7 Merrill Moores Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 8 Albert H. Vestal Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 9 Fred S. Purnell Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 10 William R. Wood Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 11 Milton Kraus Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 12 Louis W. Fairfield Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Indiana 13 Andrew J. Hickey Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Indiana

List of United States representatives from Indiana

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Indiana. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Indiana.

Indiana's 1st congressional district

Indiana's 1st congressional district

Indiana's 1st congressional district is an electoral district for the U.S. Congress in Northwestern Indiana. The district is based in Gary and its surrounding suburbs and exurbs. It consists of all of Lake and Porter counties, as well as most of the western part La Porte County, on the border with Michigan. Redistricting passed by the Indiana General Assembly in 2011 shifted the district's boundaries, effective January 2013, to include all of Lake and Porter counties and the western and northwestern townships of La Porte County, while moving Benton, Jasper and Newton counties out of the district.

Indiana's 2nd congressional district

Indiana's 2nd congressional district

Indiana's 2nd congressional district is an electoral district for the U.S. Congress in Northern Indiana. It includes South Bend and Elkhart.

Oscar E. Bland

Oscar E. Bland

Oscar Edward Bland was a United States representative from Indiana and an associate judge of the United States Court of Customs and Patent Appeals.

William A. Cullop

William A. Cullop

William Allen Cullop was an American lawyer, educator, and politician who served four terms as a U.S. Representative from Indiana from 1909 to 1917.

Indiana's 3rd congressional district

Indiana's 3rd congressional district

Indiana's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Indiana. Based in Fort Wayne, the district takes in the northeastern part of the state. In 2023, this district will include all of Adams, Allen, Blackford, DeKalb, Huntington, LaGrange, Noble, Steuben, Wells and Whitley counties, as well as northern Jay and northeast Kosciusko counties.

James W. Dunbar

James W. Dunbar

James Whitson Dunbar was a U.S. Representative from Indiana. He served a total of three terms from 1919 to 1923 and from 1929 to 1931.

Indiana's 4th congressional district

Indiana's 4th congressional district

Indiana's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Indiana. From 2003 to 2013 the district was based primarily in the central part of the state, and consisted of all of Boone, Clinton, Hendricks, Morgan, Lawrence, Montgomery, and Tippecanoe counties and parts of Fountain, Johnson, Marion, Monroe, and White counties. The district surrounded Indianapolis including the suburban area of Greenwood and encompassed the more exurban areas of Crawfordsville and Bedford, as well as the college town of Lafayette-West Lafayette, containing Purdue University.

John S. Benham

John S. Benham

John Samuel Benham was an American educator and politician who served two terms as a U.S. Representative from Indiana from 1919 to 1923.

Iowa

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Iowa 1 Charles A. Kennedy Republican 1906 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Iowa 2 Harry E. Hull Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 3 Burton E. Sweet Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 4 Gilbert N. Haugen Republican 1898 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 5 James W. Good Republican 1908 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 6 C. William Ramseyer Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 7 Cassius C. Dowell Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 8 Horace M. Towner Republican 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 9 William R. Green Republican 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 10 Lester J. Dickinson Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Iowa 11 William D. Boies Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Iowa

List of United States representatives from Iowa

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Iowa. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Iowa. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Iowa's 1st congressional district

Iowa's 1st congressional district

Iowa's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Iowa that covers its southeastern part, bordering the states of Illinois and Missouri, and the Mississippi River. The district includes the cities of Davenport, Iowa City, Burlington, and Indianola. Republican Mariannette Miller-Meeks is the current U.S. representative.

Charles A. Kennedy

Charles A. Kennedy

Charles Augustus Kennedy was a seven-term Republican U.S. Representative from Iowa's 1st congressional district in southeastern Iowa.

William F. Kopp

William F. Kopp

William Frederick Kopp was a six-term Republican U.S. Representative from Iowa's 1st congressional district.

Iowa's 2nd congressional district

Iowa's 2nd congressional district

Iowa's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Iowa that covers most of its northeastern part. It includes Cedar Rapids, Dubuque, Waterloo, and Grinnell.

Harry E. Hull

Harry E. Hull

Harry Edward Hull was an American businessman and politician who served five terms as a Republican U.S. Representative from Iowa's 2nd congressional district from 1915 to 1925. He also served as Commissioner General of Immigration in the Coolidge and Hoover administrations.

Iowa's 3rd congressional district

Iowa's 3rd congressional district

Iowa's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Iowa that covers its southwestern quadrant, which roughly consists of an area stretching from Des Moines to the borders with Nebraska and Missouri.

Burton E. Sweet

Burton E. Sweet

Burton Erwin Sweet was a four-term Republican U.S. Representative from Iowa's 3rd congressional district, then a wide but short chain of counties in north-central and northeastern Iowa, in the shape of a monkey wrench.

Iowa's 4th congressional district

Iowa's 4th congressional district

Iowa's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Iowa that covers its northwestern part, bordering the states of Minnesota, South Dakota, and Nebraska, and the Missouri River. The district includes Sioux City, Ames, Mason City, Fort Dodge, Boone and Carroll; it is currently represented by Republican Randy Feenstra, who has been in office since 2021. With a Cook Partisan Voting Index rating of R+16, it is the most Republican district in Iowa.

Gilbert N. Haugen

Gilbert N. Haugen

Gilbert Nelson Haugen was a seventeen-term Republican U.S. Representative from Iowa's 4th congressional district, then located in northeastern Iowa. For nearly five years, he was the longest-serving member of the House. Born before the American Civil War, and first elected to Congress in the 19th century, Haugen served until his defeat in the 1932 Franklin D. Roosevelt landslide.

Kansas

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Kansas 1 Daniel R. Anthony Jr. Republican 1907 (Special) Incumbent re-elected.
Kansas 2 Edward C. Little Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Kansas 3 Philip P. Campbell Republican 1902 Incumbent re-elected.
Kansas 4 Homer Hoch Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Homer Hoch (Republican) 67.0%
  • Walter W. Austin (Democratic) 30.7%
  • Carlos A. Stebbins (Socialist) 2.3%
Kansas 5 James G. Strong Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Kansas 6 Hays B. White Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Kansas 7 Jasper Napoleon Tincher Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Kansas 8 William Augustus Ayres Democratic 1914 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.

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List of United States representatives from Kansas

List of United States representatives from Kansas

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Kansas. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Kansas. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Kansas's 1st congressional district

Kansas's 1st congressional district

Kansas's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kansas. Commonly known as "The Big First", the district encompasses all or part of 64 counties spanning more than half of the state, making it the seventh-largest district in the nation that does not cover an entire state.

Kansas's 2nd congressional district

Kansas's 2nd congressional district

Kansas' 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kansas that covers most of the eastern part of the state, except for the core of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area. The district encompasses less than a quarter of the state. The state capital of Topeka, the cities of Emporia, Junction City and Leavenworth and most of Kansas City are located within this district. The district is currently represented by Republican Jake LaTurner.

Edward C. Little

Edward C. Little

Edward Campbell Little was a U.S. Representative from Kansas.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Kansas's 3rd congressional district

Kansas's 3rd congressional district

Kansas's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kansas. Located in eastern Kansas, the district encompasses all of Anderson, Franklin, Johnson and Miami counties and parts of Wyandotte County. The district includes most of the Kansas side of the Kansas City metropolitan area, including all of Overland Park, Leawood, Lenexa, Shawnee, Gardner and Olathe and parts of Kansas City.

Philip P. Campbell

Philip P. Campbell

Philip Pitt Campbell was a U.S. Representative from Kansas.

Kansas's 4th congressional district

Kansas's 4th congressional district

Kansas's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kansas. Based in the south central part of the state, the district encompasses the city of Wichita, the largest city in Kansas, three universities, Arkansas City, and the state of Kansas's only national airport.

Homer Hoch

Homer Hoch

Homer Hoch was a United States Representative from Kansas.

Kentucky

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Kentucky 1 Alben Barkley Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Alben Barkley (Democratic) 64.3%
  • Miller Hughes (Republican) 35.7%
Kentucky 2 David Hayes Kincheloe Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky 3 Robert Y. Thomas Jr. Democratic 1908 Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky 4 Ben Johnson Democratic 1906 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Ben Johnson (Democratic) 52.5%
  • John P. Haswell (Republican) 47.5%
Kentucky 5 Charles F. Ogden Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky 6 Arthur B. Rouse Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Arthur B. Rouse (Democratic) 53.7%
  • Rodney G. Beyson (Republican) 35.2%
  • Harry V. Dill (Independent) 11.1%
Kentucky 7 J. Campbell Cantrill Democratic 1908 Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky 8 King Swope Republican 1919 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic gain.
Kentucky 9 William Jason Fields Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky 10 John W. Langley Republican 1906 Incumbent re-elected.
Kentucky 11 John M. Robsion Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Kentucky

List of United States representatives from Kentucky

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the commonwealth of Kentucky. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Kentucky. The list of names should be complete as of June 4, 2020, but other data may be incomplete.

Kentucky's 1st congressional district

Kentucky's 1st congressional district

Kentucky's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Located in Western Kentucky, and stretching into Central Kentucky, the district takes in Henderson, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Paducah, Murray, and Frankfort. The district is represented by Republican James Comer who won a special election to fill the seat of Rep. Ed Whitfield who resigned in September 2016. Comer also won election to the regular term to begin January 3, 2017.

Kentucky's 2nd congressional district

Kentucky's 2nd congressional district

Kentucky's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Located in west central Kentucky, the district includes Bowling Green, Owensboro, Elizabethtown, and a portion of eastern Louisville. The district has not seen an incumbent defeated since 1884.

David Hayes Kincheloe

David Hayes Kincheloe

David Hayes Kincheloe was a United States representative from Kentucky and a judge of the United States Customs Court.

Kentucky's 3rd congressional district

Kentucky's 3rd congressional district

Kentucky's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kentucky. It encompasses almost all of Louisville Metro, which, since the merger of 2003, is consolidated with Jefferson County, though other incorporated cities exist within the county, such as Shively and St. Matthews. The far eastern reaches of Louisville Metro are part of the 2nd congressional district.

Robert Y. Thomas Jr.

Robert Y. Thomas Jr.

Robert Young Thomas Jr. was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Kentucky's 4th congressional district

Kentucky's 4th congressional district

Kentucky's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Kentucky. Located in the northeastern portion of the state, it is a long district that follows the Ohio River. However, the district is dominated by its far western portion, comprising the eastern suburbs of Louisville and Northern Kentucky, the Kentucky side of the Cincinnati area.

Ben Johnson (politician)

Ben Johnson (politician)

Ben Johnson was an American lawyer and politician; Democrat, United States House of Representatives from March 4, 1907, to March 3, 1927.

Louisiana

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Louisiana 1 James O'Connor Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Louisiana 2 Henry Garland Dupré Democratic 1908 Incumbent re-elected.
Louisiana 3 Whitmell P. Martin Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Louisiana 4 John T. Watkins Democratic 1904 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Louisiana 5 Riley Joseph Wilson Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Louisiana 6 Jared Y. Sanders Sr. Democratic 1916 Incumbent retired to run for U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Louisiana 7 Ladislas Lazaro Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Louisiana 8 James Benjamin Aswell Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Louisiana

List of United States representatives from Louisiana

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Louisiana.

Louisiana's 1st congressional district

Louisiana's 1st congressional district

Louisiana's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The district comprises land from the northern shore of Lake Pontchartrain south to the Mississippi River delta. It covers most of New Orleans' suburbs, as well as a sliver of New Orleans itself.

James O'Connor (Louisiana politician)

James O'Connor (Louisiana politician)

James O'Connor was an American politician who served in the United States House of Representatives from Louisiana's 1st congressional district for six terms as a Democrat. He also served in the Louisiana House of Representatives from 1900 to 1912.

Louisiana's 2nd congressional district

Louisiana's 2nd congressional district

Louisiana's 2nd congressional district contains nearly all of the city of New Orleans and stretches west and north to Baton Rouge. The district is currently represented by Democrat Troy Carter. With a Cook Partisan Voting Index rating of D+25, it is the only Democratic district in Louisiana.

Louisiana's 3rd congressional district

Louisiana's 3rd congressional district

Louisiana's 3rd congressional district is a United States congressional district in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The district covers the southwestern and south central portion of the state, ranging from the Texas border to the Atchafalaya River.

Whitmell P. Martin

Whitmell P. Martin

Whitmell Pugh Martin was a U.S. Representative from Louisiana. Although he later served most of his congressional career as a Democrat, Martin was first elected as a "Bull Moose" Progressive in 1914. He is the only individual ever to represent Louisiana in Congress as a member of that party.

Louisiana's 4th congressional district

Louisiana's 4th congressional district

Louisiana's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Louisiana. The district is located in the northwestern part of the state and is based in Shreveport-Bossier City. It also includes the cities of Minden, DeRidder, and Natchitoches.

John T. Watkins

John T. Watkins

John Thomas Watkins was an American lawyer and politician who served eight terms as a U.S. representative for Louisiana's 4th congressional district.

Maine

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Maine 1 Louis B. Goodall Republican 1916 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Maine 2 Wallace H. White Jr. Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Maine 3 John A. Peters Republican 1913 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John A. Peters (Republican) 66.7%
  • Archie C. Towle (Democratic) 33.3%
Maine 4 Ira G. Hersey Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Ira G. Hersey (Republican) 72.3%
  • Leon G. C. Brown (Democratic) 27.7%

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List of United States representatives from Maine

List of United States representatives from Maine

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Maine. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Maine. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Maine's 1st congressional district

Maine's 1st congressional district

Maine's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Maine. The geographically smaller of the state's two congressional districts, the district covers the southern coastal area of the state. The district consists of all of Cumberland, Knox, Lincoln, Sagadahoc, and York counties and most of Kennebec County. Located within the district are the cities of Portland, Augusta, Brunswick, and Saco. The district is currently represented by Democrat Chellie Pingree.

Louis B. Goodall

Louis B. Goodall

Louis Bertrand Goodall was a United States representative from Maine. He moved to Troy, New Hampshire with his parents in 1852. He attended the common schools of Troy, then attended a private school in Thompson, Connecticut, the Vermont Episcopal Institute, a private school in England, and the Kimball Union Academy.

Carroll L. Beedy

Carroll L. Beedy

Carroll Lynwood Beedy was a U.S. Representative from Maine from 1921 to 1935.

Maine's 2nd congressional district

Maine's 2nd congressional district

Maine's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Maine. Covering 27,326 square miles (70,770 km2), it comprises nearly 80% of the state's total land area. The district comprises most of the land area north of the Portland and Augusta metropolitan areas. It includes the cities of Lewiston, Bangor, Auburn, and Presque Isle. The district is represented by Democrat Jared Golden, who took office in 2019.

Maine's 3rd congressional district

Maine's 3rd congressional district

Maine's 3rd congressional district is an obsolete congressional district. It was created in 1821 after Maine achieved statehood in 1820 as part of the enactment of the Missouri Compromise. It was eliminated in 1963 after the 1960 U.S. Census. Its last congressman was Clifford McIntire.

Maine's 4th congressional district

Maine's 4th congressional district

Maine's 4th congressional district was a congressional district in Maine. It was created in 1821 after Maine achieved statehood in 1820 due to the result of the ratification of the Missouri Compromise. It was eliminated in 1933 after the 1930 U.S. Census. Its last congressman was Donald F. Snow.

Ira G. Hersey

Ira G. Hersey

Ira Greenlief Hersey was a politician from Hodgdon, Maine, who served in the Maine House of Representatives, the Maine State Senate, and most notably in the United States Congress as a Representative for the U.S. State of Maine.

Maryland

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Maryland 1 William N. Andrews Republican 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Democratic gain.
Maryland 2 Carville D. Benson Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Maryland 3 Charles P. Coady Democratic 1912 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Maryland 4 J. Charles Linthicum Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY J. Charles Linthicum (Democratic) 42.4%
  • William O. Atwood (Republican) 40.8%
  • W. E. Knickman (Independent) 11.1%
  • John G. Baker (Independent) 4.2%
  • C. F. Saunders (Socialist) 1.1%
  • Ada Smith Lang (Labor) 0.4%
Maryland 5 Sydney Emanuel Mudd II Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Sydney Emanuel Mudd II (Republican) 58.9%
  • Thomas S. Klinger (Democratic) 36.6%
  • John R. Riggles (Prog) 1.8%
  • Hartley-Hellyer (Independent) 1.4%
  • James L. Smiley (Socialist) 1.3%
Maryland 6 Frederick N. Zihlman Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Maryland

List of United States representatives from Maryland

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Maryland. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Maryland. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Maryland's 1st congressional district

Maryland's 1st congressional district

Maryland's 1st congressional district encompasses the entire Eastern Shore of Maryland, including Salisbury, as well as Harford County and parts of Baltimore County; it is the largest congressional district in the state geographically, covering 11 counties.

Maryland's 2nd congressional district

Maryland's 2nd congressional district

Maryland's 2nd congressional district elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives every two years. The district comprises parts of Carroll and Baltimore counties, as well as small portions of the City of Baltimore. The seat has been represented by Dutch Ruppersberger of the Democratic Party since 2003.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Maryland's 3rd congressional district

Maryland's 3rd congressional district

Maryland's 3rd congressional district comprises all of Howard county as well as parts of Anne Arundel and Carroll counties. The seat is currently represented by John Sarbanes, a Democrat.

Massachusetts

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Massachusetts 1 Allen T. Treadway Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 2 Frederick H. Gillett Republican 1892 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 3 Calvin D. Paige Republican 1913 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 4 Samuel E. Winslow Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 5 John Jacob Rogers Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 6 Willfred W. Lufkin Republican 1917 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 7 Michael F. Phelan Democratic 1912 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Massachusetts 8 Frederick W. Dallinger Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 9 Alvan T. Fuller Republican 1916 Incumbent retired to run for Lieutenant Governor
Republican hold.
Massachusetts 10 Peter Francis Tague Democratic 1914/1919 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 11 George H. Tinkham Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 12 James A. Gallivan Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 13 Robert Luce Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Robert Luce (Republican) 70.9%
  • Charles F. McCarthy (Democratic) 29.1%
Massachusetts 14 Richard Olney II Democratic 1914 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Massachusetts 15 William S. Greene Republican 1898 Incumbent re-elected.
Massachusetts 16 Joseph Walsh Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Joseph Walsh (Republican) 84.8%
  • George Richards (Labor) 15.2%

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List of United States representatives from Massachusetts

List of United States representatives from Massachusetts

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the commonwealth of Massachusetts. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Massachusetts. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district

Massachusetts's 1st congressional district is a United States congressional district located in the western and central part of Massachusetts. The state's largest congressional district in area, it covers about one-third of the state and is more rural than the rest. It has the state's highest point, Mount Greylock; the district includes the cities of Springfield, West Springfield, Pittsfield, Holyoke, Agawam, Chicopee and Westfield.

Allen T. Treadway

Allen T. Treadway

Allen Towner Treadway was a Massachusetts Republican politician.

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district

Massachusetts's 2nd congressional district is located in central Massachusetts. It contains the cities of Worcester, which is the second-largest city in New England after Boston, and Northampton in the Pioneer Valley. It is represented by Democrat Jim McGovern.

Frederick H. Gillett

Frederick H. Gillett

Frederick Huntington Gillett was an American politician who served in the Massachusetts state government and both houses of the U.S. Congress between 1879 and 1931, including six years as Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives.

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district is located in northeastern and central Massachusetts.

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district

Massachusetts's 4th congressional district is located mostly in southern Massachusetts. It is represented by Democrat Jake Auchincloss. Auchincloss was first elected in 2020.

Michigan

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Michigan 1 Frank Ellsworth Doremus Democratic 1910 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Michigan 2 Earl C. Michener Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Earl C. Michener (Republican) 70.9%
  • William H. Moore (Democratic) 29.0%
  • James W. Helme (Liberal) 0.1%
Michigan 3 John M. C. Smith Republican 1910 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Michigan 4 Edward L. Hamilton Republican 1896 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Michigan 5 Carl E. Mapes Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan 6 Patrick H. Kelley Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan 7 Louis C. Cramton Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan 8 Joseph W. Fordney Republican 1898 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Joseph W. Fordney (Republican) 72.2%
  • Austin M. Brown (Democratic) 27.6%
  • Morris McNally (Liberal) 0.2%
Michigan 9 James C. McLaughlin Republican 1906 Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan 10 Gilbert A. Currie Republican 1916 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Michigan 11 Frank D. Scott Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Michigan 12 W. Frank James Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY W. Frank James (Republican) 80.4%
  • Edward C. Anthony (Democratic) 16.2%
  • Olga S. von Zellen (Liberal) 3.4%
Michigan 13 Charles Archibald Nichols Republican 1914 Incumbent died in office.
New member elected.
Republican hold.

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List of United States representatives from Michigan

List of United States representatives from Michigan

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Michigan. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Michigan.

Michigan's 1st congressional district

Michigan's 1st congressional district

Michigan's 1st congressional district is a United States congressional district fully contains the 15 counties of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and 20 counties of Northern Michigan in the Lower Peninsula. The district is currently represented by Republican Jack Bergman.

Frank Ellsworth Doremus

Frank Ellsworth Doremus

Frank Ellsworth Doremus was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

George P. Codd

George P. Codd

George Pierre Codd was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

Frank Murphy

Frank Murphy

William Francis Murphy was an American politician, lawyer, and jurist from Michigan. He was a Democrat who was named to the Supreme Court of the United States in 1940 after a political career that included serving as United States Attorney General, 35th Governor of Michigan, and Mayor of Detroit. He also served as the last Governor-General of the Philippines and the first High Commissioner to the Philippines.

Michigan's 2nd congressional district

Michigan's 2nd congressional district

Michigan's 2nd congressional district is a United States congressional district in Western Michigan. The current 2nd district contains much of Michigan's old 4th congressional district, and includes all of Barry, Clare, Gladwin, Gratiot, Ionia, Isabella, Lake, Manistee, Mason, Mecosta, Montcalm, Newaygo, Oceana, and Osceola counties, as well as portions of Eaton, Kent, Midland, Muskegon, Ottawa and Wexford counties. Republican John Moolenaar, who had previously represented the old 4th district, was re-elected to represent the new 2nd in 2022.

Earl C. Michener

Earl C. Michener

Earl Cory Michener was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

Michigan's 3rd congressional district

Michigan's 3rd congressional district

Michigan's 3rd congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in West Michigan. From 2003 to 2013, it consisted of the counties of Barry and Ionia, as well as all except the northwestern portion of Kent, including the city of Grand Rapids. In 2012 redistricting, the district was extended to Battle Creek. In 2022, the district was condensed to the greater Grand Rapids and Muskegon areas, including portions of Kent, Muskegon and Ottawa counties. Redistricting removed Barry, Calhoun and Ionia counties.

John M. C. Smith

John M. C. Smith

John M. C. Smith was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. He served as U.S. Representative from Michigan's 3rd congressional district.

William H. Frankhauser

William H. Frankhauser

William Horace Frankhauser was an American politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

Michigan's 4th congressional district

Michigan's 4th congressional district

Michigan's 4th congressional district is a United States congressional district located in the state of Michigan. The current 4th district contains much of Michigan's old 2nd district, and includes all of Allegan and Van Buren counties, as well as portions of Ottawa, Kalamazoo, Calhoun, and Berrien counties. In 2022, the district was redrawn to start in St. Joseph Township and extend north to Port Sheldon Township. The 4th is currently represented by Republican Bill Huizenga, who previously represented the old 2nd district.

Edward L. Hamilton

Edward L. Hamilton

Edward La Rue Hamilton was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan.

Minnesota

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Minnesota 1 Sydney Anderson Republican 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Minnesota 2 Franklin Ellsworth Republican 1914 Incumbent retired to run for Governor of Michigan.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
  • Green tickY Frank Clague (Republican) 65.2%
  • H. A. Fuller (Independent) 25.6%
  • Frank Simon (Democratic) 9.2%
Minnesota 3 Charles Russell Davis Republican 1902 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Charles Russell Davis (Republican) 58.8%
  • James M. Millett (Democratic) 21.4%
  • R. A. Pomadt (Independent) 19.8%
Minnesota 4 Oscar Keller Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Oscar Keller (Republican) 58.7%
  • Thomas J. Brady (Democratic) 34.2%
  • Carl W. Cummins (Republican) 7.1%
Minnesota 5 Walter Newton Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Minnesota 6 Harold Knutson Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Minnesota 7 Andrew J. Volstead Republican 1902 Incumbent re-elected.
Minnesota 8 William L. Carss Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Minnesota 9 Halvor Steenerson Republican 1902 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Halvor Steenerson (Republican) 52.6%
  • N. E. Thormodson (Independent) 38.3%
  • Frank Jeffers (Democratic) 9.1%
Minnesota 10 Thomas D. Schall Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Minnesota

List of United States representatives from Minnesota

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Minnesota. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Minnesota.

Minnesota's 1st congressional district

Minnesota's 1st congressional district

Minnesota's 1st congressional district extends across southern Minnesota from the border with South Dakota to the border with Wisconsin. It is a primarily rural district built on a strong history of agriculture, though this is changing rapidly due to strong population growth in the Rochester combined statistical area. The district is also home to several of Minnesota's major mid-sized cities, including Rochester, Mankato, Winona, Austin, Owatonna, Albert Lea, New Ulm, and Worthington. It is represented by Republican Brad Finstad.

Sydney Anderson

Sydney Anderson

Sydney Anderson was a Representative from Minnesota; born in Zumbrota, Minnesota.

Minnesota's 2nd congressional district

Minnesota's 2nd congressional district

Minnesota's 2nd congressional district covers the south Twin Cities metro area and contains all of Scott, Dakota, and Le Sueur counties. It also contains part of northern and eastern Rice County including the city of Northfield, as well as southern Washington County including the city of Cottage Grove. Lakeville and Eagan are the largest cities in the district. Historically, for many decades in the mid 20th century the 2nd congressional district covered the southwest corner of the state, while the 1st congressional district covered most of this part of the state.

Franklin Ellsworth

Franklin Ellsworth

Franklin Fowler Ellsworth was a Representative from Minnesota; born in St. James, Watonwan County, Minnesota, July 10, 1879; attended the grade and high schools; enlisted as a private in Company H, Twelfth Regiment, Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, during the Spanish–American War; attended the law department of the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis; was admitted to the bar in 1901 and commenced practice in St. James; city attorney of St. James in 1904 and 1905; prosecuting attorney of Watonwan County 1905–1909; elected as a Republican to the 64th, 65th, and 66th congresses ; was not a candidate for renomination in 1920, having become a gubernatorial candidate; unsuccessful candidate for Governor of Minnesota in 1920 and 1924; moved to Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1921 and resumed the practice of his profession; died in Minneapolis, December 23, 1942; interment in Lakewood Cemetery.

Governor of Michigan

Governor of Michigan

The governor of Michigan is the head of state, head of government, and chief executive of the U.S. state of Michigan. The current governor is Gretchen Whitmer, a member of the Democratic Party, who was inaugurated on January 1, 2019, as the state's 49th governor. She was re-elected to serve a second term in 2022. The governor is elected to a 4-year term and is limited to two terms.

Frank Clague

Frank Clague

Frank Andrew Clague was a U.S. Representative from Minnesota. He was born in Warrensville, Cuyahoga County, Ohio; attended the common schools; moved to Minnesota in 1881; attended the State normal school at Mankato 1882 – 1885; taught school at Springfield, Minnesota, 1886 – 1890; studied law; was admitted to the bar in 1891 and commenced practice in Lamberton, Redwood County, Minnesota, the same year; prosecuting attorney of Redwood County, Minnesota, 1895 – 1903; member of the Minnesota House of Representatives from January 1, 1903, to January 1, 1907, serving as speaker in the 1905 session; served in the Minnesota Senate from January 1, 1907, to December 31, 1915; judge of the ninth judicial district of Minnesota from January 1, 1919, to March 1, 1920, when he resigned; elected as a Republican to the 67th, 68th, 69th, 70th, 71st, and 72nd congresses, ; was not a candidate for renomination in 1932; resumed the practice of law and also engaged in agricultural pursuits until his retirement; died in Redwood Falls, Minnesota, March 25, 1952; interment in Redwood Falls Cemetery.

Minnesota's 3rd congressional district

Minnesota's 3rd congressional district

Minnesota's 3rd congressional district encompasses the suburbs of Hennepin and Anoka counties to the west, south, and north of Minneapolis. The district, which is mostly suburban in character, includes a few farming communities on its far western edge and also inner-ring suburban areas on its eastern edge. The district includes the blue collar cities of Brooklyn Park and Coon Rapids to the north-east, middle-income Bloomington to the south, and higher-income Eden Prairie, Edina, Maple Grove, Plymouth, Minnetonka, and Wayzata to the west. Democrat Dean Phillips currently represents the district in the U.S. House of Representatives, after defeating incumbent Republican Erik Paulsen in the November 2018 mid-term elections.

Charles Russell Davis

Charles Russell Davis

Charles Russell Davis was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Minnesota.

Minnesota's 4th congressional district

Minnesota's 4th congressional district

Minnesota's 4th congressional district covers nearly all of Ramsey County, and part of Washington County. It includes all of St. Paul, and most of its northern and eastern suburbs. The district is solidly Democratic, with a CPVI of D+14. It is currently represented by Betty McCollum, of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (DFL). The DFL has held the seat without interruption since 1949, and all but one term (1947-1949) since the merger of the Democratic and Farmer-Labor Parties.

Oscar Keller

Oscar Keller

Oscar Edward Keller was a representative from Minnesota.

Mississippi

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Mississippi 1 Ezekiel S. Candler Jr. Democratic 1900 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Mississippi 2 Hubert D. Stephens Democratic 1910 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Mississippi 3 Benjamin G. Humphreys II Democratic 1902 Incumbent re-elected.
Mississippi 4 Thomas U. Sisson Democratic 1908 Incumbent re-elected.
Mississippi 5 William W. Venable Democratic 1916 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Mississippi 6 Paul B. Johnson Sr. Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Mississippi 7 Percy E. Quin Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Mississippi 8 James W. Collier Democratic 1908 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Mississippi

List of United States representatives from Mississippi

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Mississippi. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Mississippi. The list of names should be complete as of January 3, 2023, but other data may be incomplete.

Mississippi's 1st congressional district

Mississippi's 1st congressional district

Mississippi's 1st congressional district is in the northeast corner of the state. It includes much of the northern portion of the state including Columbus, Oxford, Southaven, Tupelo and West Point. The University of Mississippi, is located within the district.

Ezekiel S. Candler Jr.

Ezekiel S. Candler Jr.

Ezekiel Samuel Candler Jr. was an American politician and lawyer who served in the United States House of Representatives, representing the 1st congressional district of Mississippi for two decades as a Democrat. He subsequently served as the mayor of Corinth, Mississippi from 1933 to 1937.

John E. Rankin

John E. Rankin

John Elliott Rankin was a Democratic politician from Mississippi who served sixteen terms in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1921 to 1953. He was co-author of the bill for the Tennessee Valley Authority and from 1933 to 1936 he supported the New Deal programs of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, which brought investment and jobs to the South.

Mississippi's 2nd congressional district

Mississippi's 2nd congressional district

Mississippi's 2nd congressional district (MS-2) covers much of Western Mississippi. It includes most of Jackson, the riverfront cities of Greenville and Vicksburg and the interior market cities of Clarksdale, Greenwood and Clinton. The district is approximately 275 miles (443 km) long, 180 miles (290 km) wide and borders the Mississippi River; it encompasses much of the Mississippi Delta, and a total of 15 counties and parts of several others. It is the only majority-black district in the state.

Hubert D. Stephens

Hubert D. Stephens

Hubert Durrett Stephens was an American politician who served as a Democratic United States Senator from Mississippi from 1923 until 1935.

Bill G. Lowrey

Bill G. Lowrey

Bill Green Lowrey was a U.S. Representative from Mississippi.

Mississippi's 3rd congressional district

Mississippi's 3rd congressional district

Mississippi's 3rd congressional district (MS-3) covers central portions of state and stretches from the Louisiana border in the west to the Alabama border in the east.

Benjamin G. Humphreys II

Benjamin G. Humphreys II

Benjamin Grubb Humphreys II was a U.S. Representative from Mississippi. He was known by his constituents as "Our Ben."

Mississippi's 4th congressional district

Mississippi's 4th congressional district

Mississippi's 4th congressional district covers the southeastern region of the state. It includes all of Mississippi's Gulf Coast, stretching ninety miles between the Alabama border to the east and the Louisiana border to the west, and extends north into the Pine Belt region. It includes three of Mississippi's four most heavily populated cities: Gulfport, Biloxi, and Hattiesburg. Other major cities within the district include Bay St. Louis, Laurel, and Pascagoula.

Thomas U. Sisson

Thomas U. Sisson

Thomas Upton Sisson was a U.S. Representative from Mississippi.

Missouri

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Missouri 1 Milton A. Romjue Democratic 1916 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 2 William W. Rucker Democratic 1898 Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri 3 Jacob L. Milligan Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 4 Charles F. Booher Democratic 1906 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 5 William Thomas Bland Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 6 Clement C. Dickinson Democratic 1910 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 7 Samuel C. Major Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 8 William L. Nelson Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 9 Champ Clark Democratic 1896 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Missouri 10 Cleveland A. Newton Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri 11 William L. Igoe Democratic 1912 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
Missouri 12 Leonidas C. Dyer Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri 13 Marion E. Rhodes Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri 14 Edward D. Hays Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri 15 Isaac V. McPherson Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Missouri 16 Thomas L. Rubey Democratic 1910 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.

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List of United States representatives from Missouri

List of United States representatives from Missouri

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Missouri. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Missouri. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Missouri's 1st congressional district

Missouri's 1st congressional district

Missouri's 1st congressional district is in the eastern portion of the state. It includes all of St. Louis City and much of northern St. Louis County, including the cities of Maryland Heights, University City, Ferguson and Florissant. The district is easily the most Democratic in Missouri, with a Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+27; the next most Democratic district in the state, the Kansas City-based 5th, has a PVI of D+11. Roughly half of the 1st district's population is African American.

Milton A. Romjue

Milton A. Romjue

Milton Andrew Romjue was a U.S. Representative from Missouri.

Frank C. Millspaugh

Frank C. Millspaugh

Frank Crenshaw Millspaugh was a United States Representative from Missouri.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Missouri's 2nd congressional district

Missouri's 2nd congressional district

Missouri's second congressional district is in the eastern portion of the state, primarily consisting of the suburbs south and west of St. Louis, including Arnold, Town and Country, Wildwood, Chesterfield, and Oakville. The district includes portions of St. Louis, Jefferson and St. Charles counties. Following redistricting in 2010, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported that the district now included more Democratic-leaning voters than it had its 2001–2010 boundaries, but still leaned Republican as a whole. The latest U.S. Census Electorate Profile for the 2nd congressional district estimates there are 581,131 citizens of voting age living in 293,984 households. A primarily suburban district, MO-02 is the wealthiest of Missouri's congressional districts.

William W. Rucker

William W. Rucker

William Waller Rucker was a U.S. Representative from Missouri.

Missouri's 3rd congressional district

Missouri's 3rd congressional district

Missouri's third congressional district is in the eastern and central portion of the state. It surrounds but does not include St Louis City. Its current representative is Republican Blaine Luetkemeyer.

Jacob L. Milligan

Jacob L. Milligan

Jacob Le Roy Milligan was a United States Representative from Missouri.

Henry F. Lawrence

Henry F. Lawrence

Henry Franklin Lawrence was a U.S. Representative from Missouri.

Montana

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Montana 1 John M. Evans Democratic 1912 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected. (?)
Republican gain.
Montana 2 Carl W. Riddick Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Montana

List of United States representatives from Montana

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Montana. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Montana. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Montana's 1st congressional district

Montana's 1st congressional district

Montana's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the United States House of Representatives that was apportioned after the 2020 United States census. The first candidates ran in the 2022 elections for a seat in the 118th United States Congress.

John M. Evans

John M. Evans

John Morgan Evans was an American Democratic politician.

Washington J. McCormick

Washington J. McCormick

Washington Jay Mccormick, Jr. was a U.S. Representative from Montana.

Montana's 2nd congressional district

Montana's 2nd congressional district

Montana's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the United States House of Representatives that was apportioned after the 2020 United States census. The first candidates ran in the 2022 elections for a seat in the 118th United States Congress.

Carl W. Riddick

Carl W. Riddick

Carlos Wood Riddick was an American politician and businessman. He served as a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Montana's 2nd congressional district.

Nebraska

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Nebraska 1 C. Frank Reavis Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Nebraska 2 Albert W. Jefferis Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Nebraska 3 Robert E. Evans Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Robert E. Evans (Republican) 54.0%
  • Webb Rice (Democratic) 24.2%
  • Marie Weekes (Independent) 21.8%
Nebraska 4 Melvin O. McLaughlin Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Nebraska 5 William E. Andrews Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Nebraska 6 Moses P. Kinkaid Republican 1902 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Moses P. Kinkaid (Republican) 64.5%
  • Thomas C. Grimes (Democratic) 27.3%
  • Lucien Stebbins (Independent) 8.2%

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List of United States representatives from Nebraska

List of United States representatives from Nebraska

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Nebraska. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Nebraska. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Nebraska's 1st congressional district

Nebraska's 1st congressional district

Nebraska's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Nebraska that encompasses most of its eastern quarter, except for Omaha and some of its suburbs, which are part of the 2nd congressional district. It includes the state capital Lincoln, as well as the cities of Bellevue, Fremont, and Norfolk. Following the 2010 United States Census, the 1st congressional district was changed to include an eastern section of Sarpy County; Dakota County was moved to the 3rd congressional district.

C. Frank Reavis

C. Frank Reavis

Charles Frank Reavis was an American Republican Party politician.

Nebraska's 2nd congressional district

Nebraska's 2nd congressional district

Nebraska's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Nebraska that encompasses the core of the Omaha–Council Bluffs metropolitan area. It includes all of Douglas County, which includes the state's largest city Omaha; it also includes Sauders County and areas of Western Sarpy County. It has been represented in the United States House of Representatives since 2017 by Don Bacon, a member of the Republican Party. It was one of 18 districts that voted for Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election while being won or held by a Republican in 2022.

Albert W. Jefferis

Albert W. Jefferis

Albert Webb Jefferis was an American Republican Party politician.

Nebraska's 3rd congressional district

Nebraska's 3rd congressional district

Nebraska's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Nebraska that encompasses its western three-fourths; it is one of the largest non-at-large districts in the country, covering nearly 65,000 square miles (170,000 km2), two time zones and 68 counties. It includes Grand Island, Kearney, Hastings, North Platte, Alliance, and Scottsbluff. Additionally, it encompasses the Sandhills region and a large majority of the Platte River.

Robert E. Evans

Robert E. Evans

Robert Emory Evans was a Nebraska Republican politician.

Nebraska's 4th congressional district

Nebraska's 4th congressional district

Nebraska's 4th congressional district is an obsolete district. It was created after the 1890 census and abolished after the 1960 census.

Melvin O. McLaughlin

Melvin O. McLaughlin

Melvin Orlando McLaughlin was an American Republican Party politician.

Nevada

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Nevada at-large Charles R. Evans Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.

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List of United States representatives from Nevada

List of United States representatives from Nevada

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Nevada. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Nevada. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Nevada's at-large congressional district

Nevada's at-large congressional district

Nevada's at-large congressional district was created when Nevada was granted statehood in 1864, encompassing the entire state. It existed until 1983, when it eliminated as a result of the redistricting cycle after the 1980 Census and subsequent reapportionment in which Nevada was awarded a second seat in the House of Representatives. Nevada began electing two representatives from separate districts commencing with the election of 1982 and the 98th Congress.

Charles R. Evans

Charles R. Evans

Charles Robley Evans was a United States representative from Nevada for one term.

Samuel S. Arentz

Samuel S. Arentz

Samuel Shaw (Ulysses) Arentz was a United States representative from Nevada. A Republican, he served 10 years in Congress.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

New Hampshire

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
New Hampshire 1 Sherman Everett Burroughs Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
New Hampshire 2 Edward Hills Wason Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from New Hampshire

List of United States representatives from New Hampshire

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New Hampshire. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from New Hampshire. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

New Hampshire's 1st congressional district

New Hampshire's 1st congressional district

New Hampshire's 1st congressional district covers parts of Southern New Hampshire and the eastern portion of the state. The district contains parts of Hillsborough, Rockingham, Merrimack, Grafton, and Belknap counties; and the entirety of Strafford and Carroll counties.

Sherman Everett Burroughs

Sherman Everett Burroughs

Sherman Everett Burroughs was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from New Hampshire.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district

New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district

New Hampshire's 2nd congressional district covers the western, northern, and some southern parts of New Hampshire. It includes the state's second-largest city, Nashua, as well as the state capital, Concord. It is currently represented in the United States House of Representatives by Democrat Ann McLane Kuster.

Edward Hills Wason

Edward Hills Wason

Edward Hills Wason was a U.S. Representative from New Hampshire.

New Jersey

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
New Jersey 1 William J. Browning Republican 1910 Incumbent died in office.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
New Jersey 2 Isaac Bacharach Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New Jersey 3 Thomas J. Scully Democratic 1910 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New Jersey 4 Elijah C. Hutchinson Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New Jersey 5 Ernest R. Ackerman Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New Jersey 6 John R. Ramsey Republican 1916 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
New Jersey 7 Amos H. Radcliffe Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New Jersey 8 Cornelius A. McGlennon Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New Jersey 9 Daniel F. Minahan Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New Jersey 10 Frederick R. Lehlbach Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New Jersey 11 John J. Eagan Democratic 1912 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New Jersey 12 James A. Hamill Democratic 1906 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.

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List of United States representatives from New Jersey

List of United States representatives from New Jersey

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New Jersey. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from New Jersey. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

New Jersey's 1st congressional district

New Jersey's 1st congressional district

New Jersey's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of New Jersey. The district, which includes Camden and South Jersey suburbs of Philadelphia, has been represented by Democrat Donald Norcross since November 2014. It is among the most reliably Democratic districts in New Jersey, as it is mainly made up of Democratic-dominated Camden County.

William J. Browning

William J. Browning

William John Browning was an American Republican party politician who represented New Jersey's 1st congressional district as a U.S. Representative from 1911, until his death in 1920.

Francis F. Patterson Jr.

Francis F. Patterson Jr.

Francis Ford Patterson Jr. was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jersey's 1st congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1920 to 1927.

Prohibition Party

Prohibition Party

The Prohibition Party (PRO) is a political party in the United States known for its historic opposition to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages and as an integral part of the temperance movement. It is the oldest existing third party in the United States and the third-longest active party.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

New Jersey's 2nd congressional district

New Jersey's 2nd congressional district

New Jersey's 2nd congressional district, based in Southern New Jersey, is represented by Republican Jeff Van Drew. He was first elected as a Democrat in 2018, but announced on December 19, 2019, that he would be switching parties. The district, which is New Jersey's largest geographically, is a Republican-leaning seat that has shifted to the right since the late 2010s.

Isaac Bacharach

Isaac Bacharach

Isaac Bacharach was an American Republican Party politician from New Jersey who represented the 2nd congressional district from 1915 to 1937.

New Jersey's 3rd congressional district

New Jersey's 3rd congressional district

New Jersey's 3rd congressional district is represented by Democrat Andy Kim of Moorestown who has served in Congress since 2019.

Thomas J. Scully

Thomas J. Scully

Thomas Joseph Scully was an American Democratic Party politician who represented New Jersey's 3rd congressional district for five terms from 1911 to 1921.

T. Frank Appleby

T. Frank Appleby

Theodore Frank Appleby was an American Republican Party politician who represented New Jersey's 3rd congressional district in the United States House of Representatives from 1921 to 1923. He was the father of Stewart Hoffman Appleby, who also became a congressman from New Jersey.

New Jersey's 4th congressional district

New Jersey's 4th congressional district

New Jersey's 4th congressional district is a congressional district that stretches along the New Jersey Shore. It has been represented by Republican Chris Smith since 1981, the second-longest currently serving member of the US House of Representatives and the longest serving member of Congress from New Jersey in history.

New Mexico

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
New Mexico at-large Benigno C. Hernández Republican 1918 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.

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List of United States representatives from New Mexico

List of United States representatives from New Mexico

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New Mexico. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from New Mexico. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

New Mexico's at-large congressional district

New Mexico's at-large congressional district

From statehood in 1912 to 1969, New Mexico did not use congressional districts for its representatives to the United States House of Representatives. Instead, it elected its representatives statewide at-large.

Benigno C. Hernández

Benigno C. Hernández

Benigno Cárdenas Hernández was the first Hispanic from New Mexico to serve as a full member of Congress.

Néstor Montoya

Néstor Montoya

Néstor Montoya was a United States representative from New Mexico. As an editor and politician, Néstor Montoya dedicated himself to the inclusion of Hispanics in the political and social life of New Mexico, and to the campaign for New Mexico statehood.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

New York

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
New York 1 Frederick C. Hicks Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 2 C. Pope Caldwell Democratic 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
New York 3 John MacCrate Republican 1918 Incumbent retired to run for Justice.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
New York 4 Thomas H. Cullen Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 5 John B. Johnston Democratic 1918 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 6 Frederick W. Rowe Republican 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
New York 7 James P. Maher Democratic 1910 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 8 William E. Cleary Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 9 David J. O'Connell Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 10 Reuben L. Haskell Republican 1914 Resigned
Republican hold.
New York 11 Daniel J. Riordan Democratic 1906 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 12 Henry M. Goldfogle Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Socialist gain.
New York 13 Christopher D. Sullivan Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 14 Fiorello La Guardia Republican 1916 Incumbent retired when elected to New York City Board of Aldermen.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
New York 15 Peter J. Dooling Democratic 1912 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 16 Thomas Francis Smith Democratic 1917 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
New York 17 Herbert Pell Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 18 John F. Carew Democratic 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 19 Joseph Rowan Democratic 1918 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 20 Isaac Siegel Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 21 Jerome F. Donovan Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 22 Anthony J. Griffin Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 23 Richard F. McKiniry Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 24 James V. Ganly Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
New York 25 James W. Husted Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 26 Edmund Platt Republican 1912 Resigned when appointed to Federal Reserve Board
Republican hold.
New York 27 Charles B. Ward Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 28 Rollin B. Sanford Republican 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic gain.
New York 29 James S. Parker Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 30 Frank Crowther Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 31 Bertrand Snell Republican 1915 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 32 Luther W. Mott Republican 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Luther W. Mott (Republican) 72.6%
  • Newton S. Beebe (Democratic) 27.4%
New York 33 Homer P. Snyder Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 34 William H. Hill Republican 1918 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
New York 35 Walter W. Magee Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 36 Norman J. Gould Republican 1915 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 37 Alanson B. Houghton Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 38 Thomas B. Dunn Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 39 Archie D. Sanders Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 40 S. Wallace Dempsey Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 41 Clarence MacGregor Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 42 James M. Mead Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
New York 43 Daniel A. Reed Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from New York

List of United States representatives from New York

The following is a list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of New York. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from New York. The list of names should be complete as of August 23, 2022, but other data may be incomplete.

New York's 1st congressional district

New York's 1st congressional district

New York’s 1st congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in eastern Long Island. It includes the eastern two-thirds of Suffolk County, including the northern portion of Brookhaven, as well as the entirety of the towns of Huntington, Smithtown, Riverhead, Southold, Southampton, East Hampton, and Shelter Island. The district encompasses extremely wealthy enclaves such as the Hamptons, middle class suburban towns such as Selden, Centereach and Lake Grove, working-class towns such as Riverhead and rural farming communities such as Mattituck and Jamesport on the North Fork. The district currently is represented by Republican Nick LaLota.

Frederick C. Hicks

Frederick C. Hicks

Frederick Charles Hicks was an American banker and politician who served as a United States representative from New York from 1916 to 1923.

Alfred J. Kennedy

Alfred J. Kennedy

Alfred J. Kennedy was an American politician from New York.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

New York's 2nd congressional district

New York's 2nd congressional district

New York's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives along the South Shore of Long Island, New York. It includes southwestern Suffolk County and a small portion of southeastern Nassau County. The district is currently represented by Republican Andrew Garbarino.

C. Pope Caldwell

C. Pope Caldwell

Charles Pope Caldwell was an American lawyer and politician who served three terms as a U.S. Representative from New York from 1915 to 1921.

John J. Kindred

John J. Kindred

John Joseph Kindred was an American physician and politician. Kindred served five terms as U.S. Representative from New York from 1911 to 1913, and from 1921 to 1929, before returning to the practice of medicine. As a physician, his focus was on mental diseases, and he established mental hospitals in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

Prohibition Party

Prohibition Party

The Prohibition Party (PRO) is a political party in the United States known for its historic opposition to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages and as an integral part of the temperance movement. It is the oldest existing third party in the United States and the third-longest active party.

New York's 3rd congressional district

New York's 3rd congressional district

New York's 3rd congressional district is a congressional district for the United States House of Representatives in the State of New York. It is represented by Republican George Santos, who was elected to represent the district in 2022. It was one of 18 districts that voted for Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election while being won or held by a Republican in 2022.

John MacCrate

John MacCrate

John MacCrate was a lawyer, a politician, serving as a U.S. representative from New York, and a justice of the New York Supreme Court.

John Kissel (New York politician)

John Kissel (New York politician)

John Kissel was an American newspaper publisher and politician from New York.

North Carolina

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
North Carolina 1 John Humphrey Small Democratic 1898 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
North Carolina 2 Claude Kitchin Democratic 1900 Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 3 Samuel M. Brinson Democratic 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 4 Edward W. Pou Democratic 1900 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Edward W. Pou (Democratic) 65.3%
  • James D. Parker (Republican) 34.7%
North Carolina 5 Charles Manly Stedman Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 6 Hannibal L. Godwin Democratic 1906 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
  • Green tickY Homer L. Lyon (Democratic) 68.6%
  • R. S. White (Republican) 31.4%
North Carolina 7 Leonidas D. Robinson Democratic 1916 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
North Carolina 8 Robert L. Doughton Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
North Carolina 9 Clyde R. Hoey Democratic 1919 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
North Carolina 10 Zebulon Weaver Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from North Carolina

List of United States representatives from North Carolina

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of North Carolina. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from North Carolina. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

North Carolina's 1st congressional district

North Carolina's 1st congressional district

North Carolina's 1st congressional district is located in the northeastern part of the state. It consists of many Black Belt counties that border Virginia and it extends southward into several counties of the Inner Banks and the Research Triangle. It covers many rural areas of northeastern North Carolina, among the state's most economically poor, as well as outer exurbs of urbanized Research Triangle. It contains towns and cities such as Greenville, Rocky Mount, Wilson, Goldsboro, Henderson, and Roanoke Rapids.

John Humphrey Small

John Humphrey Small

John Humphrey Small was an attorney and a U.S. Representative from North Carolina.

Hallett Sydney Ward

Hallett Sydney Ward

Hallett Sydney Ward was a Democratic U.S. Congressman from North Carolina between 1921 and 1925.

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district

North Carolina's 2nd congressional district is located in the central part of the state. The district contains most of Wake County. Prior to court-mandated redistricting in 2019, it also included northern Johnston County, southern Nash County, far western Wilson County, and all of Franklin and Harnett counties. The 2nd district has been represented by Democratic Rep. Deborah Ross since 2021.

Claude Kitchin

Claude Kitchin

Claude Kitchin was an American politician who served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from the state of North Carolina from 1901 until his death in 1923. A lifelong member of the Democratic Party, he was elected House majority leader for the 64th and 65th congresses (1915–1919), and minority leader during the 67th Congress (1921–1923).

North Carolina's 3rd congressional district

North Carolina's 3rd congressional district

North Carolina's 3rd congressional district is located on the Atlantic coast of North Carolina. It covers the Outer Banks and the counties adjacent to the Pamlico Sound.

Samuel M. Brinson

Samuel M. Brinson

Samuel Mitchell Brinson was an American politician.

North Carolina's 4th congressional district

North Carolina's 4th congressional district

The 4th congressional district of North Carolina is located in the central region of the state. The district includes all of Durham County, Orange County, Granville County, and Franklin County, as well as portions of Chatham County, northern Wake County, and southern Vance County.

Edward W. Pou

Edward W. Pou

Edward William Pou, was an American politician, serving in the United States Congress as a representative from 1901 until his death in Washington, D.C., on April 1, 1934. From March 1933 to April 1934, he was the longest-serving current member of Congress and was the Dean of the United States House of Representatives.

North Dakota

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
North Dakota 1 John M. Baer Nonpartisan League 1916 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
North Dakota 2 George M. Young Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
North Dakota 3 James H. Sinclair Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from North Dakota

List of United States representatives from North Dakota

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of North Dakota. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from North Dakota. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented only the state both past and present, as the Dakota Territory encompassed in addition South Dakota, and parts of present-day Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho.

North Dakota's 1st congressional district

North Dakota's 1st congressional district

North Dakota's 1st congressional district is an obsolete congressional district in the state of North Dakota that existed from 1913 to 1933, and from 1963 to 1973.

Olger B. Burtness

Olger B. Burtness

Olger Burton Burtness was a U.S. Representative from North Dakota and a North Dakota District Court Judge.

Nonpartisan League

Nonpartisan League

The Nonpartisan League (NPL) was a left-wing political party founded in 1915 in North Dakota by Arthur C. Townley, a former organizer for the Socialist Party of America. On behalf of small farmers and merchants, the Nonpartisan League advocated state control of mills, grain elevators, banks and other farm-related industries in order to reduce the power of corporate and political interests from Minneapolis and Chicago.

North Dakota's 2nd congressional district

North Dakota's 2nd congressional district

North Dakota's 2nd congressional district is an obsolete congressional district in the state of North Dakota that was created by reapportionments in 1913, and eliminated by the reapportionments in 1933. North Dakota elected its two Representatives in a two-member at large district from 1932 to 1960, but then resurrected single-member districts in 1962. The district was eliminated by the reapportionment as a result of the 1970 redistricting cycle after the 1970 United States census. The seat was last filled from 1971 to 1973 by Arthur A. Link, who sought the office of Governor of North Dakota after not being able to run again for the defunct seat.

George M. Young

George M. Young

George Morley Young was a United States representative from North Dakota and a judge of the United States Customs Court.

Ole H. Olson

Ole H. Olson

Ole H. Olson was the 16th lieutenant governor and 18th governor of North Dakota.

North Dakota's 3rd congressional district

North Dakota's 3rd congressional district

North Dakota's 3rd congressional district is an obsolete congressional district in the state of North Dakota that was created by reapportionments in 1913, and eliminated by the reapportionments of the 1930 census in 1933. The district consisted of the western part of the state, and was made up of following counties: Divide, Burke, Renville, Ward, Mountrail, Williams, McKenzie, McLean, Dunn, Mercer, Oliver, Billings, Stark, Morton, Hettinger, Bowman and Adams.

James H. Sinclair

James H. Sinclair

James Herbert Sinclair was a U.S. Republican politician.

Ohio

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Ohio 1 Nicholas Longworth Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Nicholas Longworth (Republican) 57.6%
  • John H. Allen (Democratic) 40.4%
  • Eli G. Frankenstein (Independent) 1.1%
  • Edward L. Hitchens (Republican) 0.9%
Ohio 2 Ambrose E. B. Stephens Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Ambrose E. B. Stephens (Republican) 52.6%
  • Thomas H. Morrow (Democratic) 46.0%
  • John Partridge (Independent) 1.4%
Ohio 3 Warren Gard Democratic 1912 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Roy G. Fitzgerald (Republican) 50.2%
  • William G. Pickerel (Democratic) 44.9%
  • Clarence M. Gauger (Independent) 4.9%
Ohio 4 Benjamin F. Welty Democratic 1916 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Ohio 5 Charles J. Thompson Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio 6 Charles C. Kearns Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio 7 Simeon D. Fess Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio 8 R. Clint Cole Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY R. Clint Cole (Republican) 54.2%
  • Fred H. Guthery (Democratic) 45.8%
Ohio 9 Isaac R. Sherwood Democratic 1906 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Ohio 10 Israel M. Foster Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio 11 Edwin D. Ricketts Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio 12 Clement Laird Brumbaugh Democratic 1912 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Ohio 13 James T. Begg Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY James T. Begg (Republican) 64.5%
  • Alfred Waggoner (Democratic) 35.5%
Ohio 14 Martin L. Davey Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Ohio 15 C. Ellis Moore Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY C. Ellis Moore (Republican) 58.3%
  • John S. Talbott (Democratic) 41.7%
Ohio 16 Roscoe C. McCulloch Republican 1914 Incumbent retired to run for Governor of Ohio.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Ohio 17 William A. Ashbrook Democratic 1906 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Ohio 18 B. Frank Murphy Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio 19 John G. Cooper Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Ohio 20 Charles A. Mooney Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Ohio 21 John J. Babka Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Ohio 22 Henry I. Emerson Republican 1914 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
  • Green tickY Theodore E. Burton (Republican) 74.3%
  • Matthew B. Excell (Democratic) 25.1%
  • Max J. Sillins (Independent) 0.6%

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List of United States representatives from Ohio

List of United States representatives from Ohio

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Ohio. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Ohio. The list of names should be complete as of January 2019, but other data may be incomplete.

Ohio's 1st congressional district

Ohio's 1st congressional district

Ohio's 1st congressional district is represented by Democrat Greg Landsman. The district includes the city of Cincinnati, all of Warren County and borders the state of Kentucky. This district was once represented by President William Henry Harrison. After redistricting in 2010, the district was widely seen as heavily gerrymandered by state Republicans to protect the incumbent, Steve Chabot. Chabot lost the seat in 2022 to Democrat Greg Landsman, after redistricting unified the city of Cincinnati into the district. The city was previously split between the 1st and 2nd districts.

Nicholas Longworth

Nicholas Longworth

Nicholas Longworth III was an American lawyer and politician who became Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. A Republican, he was elected to the Ohio Senate, where he initiated the successful Longworth Act of 1902, regulating the issuance of municipal bonds. As congressman for Ohio's 1st congressional district, he soon became a popular social figure of Washington, and married President Theodore Roosevelt's daughter Alice Lee Roosevelt. Their relationship became strained when he opposed her father in the Republican Party split of 1912. Longworth became Majority Leader of the House in 1923, and Speaker from 1925 to 1931. In this post, he exercised powerful leadership, tempered by charm and tact.

Ohio's 2nd congressional district

Ohio's 2nd congressional district

Ohio's 2nd congressional district is a district in southern Ohio. It is currently represented by Republican Brad Wenstrup.

Ambrose E. B. Stephens

Ambrose E. B. Stephens

Ambrose Everett Burnside Stephens was an American politician who served four terms as a U.S. Representative from Ohio from 1919 to 1927.

Ohio's 3rd congressional district

Ohio's 3rd congressional district

Ohio's 3rd congressional district is located entirely in Franklin County and includes most of the city of Columbus. The current district lines were drawn in 2022, following the redistricting based on the 2020 census. It is currently represented by Democrat Joyce Beatty.

Warren Gard

Warren Gard

Warren Gard was an attorney, prosecutor, jurist and member of the United States House of Representatives from Ohio for four terms from 1913 to 1921.

Roy G. Fitzgerald

Roy G. Fitzgerald

Roy Gerald Fitzgerald was an attorney, soldier, preservationist, and a member of the United States House of Representatives from Ohio.

Ohio's 4th congressional district

Ohio's 4th congressional district

Ohio's 4th congressional district spans sections of the central part of the state. It is currently represented by Republican Jim Jordan, the current chair of the House Judiciary Committee, who has represented the district since 2007.

Benjamin F. Welty

Benjamin F. Welty

Benjamin Franklin Welty was an American soldier, attorney, and a U.S. Representative from Ohio from 1917 to 1921.

Oklahoma

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Oklahoma 1 Everette B. Howard Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Oklahoma 2 William W. Hastings Democratic 1914 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Oklahoma 3 Charles D. Carter Democratic 1907 (New state) Incumbent re-elected.
Oklahoma 4 Tom D. McKeown Democratic 1916 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Oklahoma 5 John W. Harreld Republican 1919 (Special) Incumbent retired to run for U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Democratic gain.
Oklahoma 6 Scott Ferris Democratic 1907 (New state) Incumbent retired to run for U.S. senator.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Oklahoma 7 James V. McClintic Democratic 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Oklahoma 8 Dick Thompson Morgan Republican 1908 Incumbent died in office.
New member elected.
Republican hold.

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List of United States representatives from Oklahoma

List of United States representatives from Oklahoma

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Oklahoma. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Oklahoma. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Oklahoma's 1st congressional district

Oklahoma's 1st congressional district

Oklahoma's 1st congressional district is in the northeastern corner of the state and borders Kansas. Anchored by Tulsa, it is largely coextensive with the Tulsa metropolitan area. It includes all of Tulsa, Washington and Wagoner counties, and parts of Rogers and Creek counties. Although it has long been reckoned as the Tulsa district, a small portion of Tulsa itself is located in the 3rd district.

Everette B. Howard

Everette B. Howard

Everette Burgess Howard was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from Oklahoma.

Thomas Alberter Chandler

Thomas Alberter Chandler

Thomas Alberter Chandler was an American politician and a U.S. Representative from Oklahoma.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Oklahoma's 2nd congressional district

Oklahoma's 2nd congressional district

Oklahoma's 2nd congressional district is one of five United States congressional districts in Oklahoma and covers approximately one-fourth of the state in the east. The district borders Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Texas and includes a total of 24 counties.

Oklahoma's 3rd congressional district

Oklahoma's 3rd congressional district

Oklahoma's 3rd congressional district is the largest congressional district in the state, covering an area of 34,088.49 square miles, over 48 percent the state's land mass. The district is bordered by New Mexico, Colorado, Kansas, and the Texas panhandle. Altogether, the district includes a total of 32 counties, and covers more territory than the state's other four districts combined. It is one of the largest districts in the nation that does not cover an entire state.

Charles D. Carter

Charles D. Carter

Charles David Carter was a Native American politician elected as U.S. Representative from Oklahoma, serving from 1907 to 1927. During this period, he also served as Mining Trustee for Indian Territory, 1900–1904, appointed by President William McKinley.

1907 United States House of Representatives elections in Oklahoma

1907 United States House of Representatives elections in Oklahoma

The 1907 United States House of Representatives elections in Oklahoma were held on September 17, 1907 to elect the five U.S. representatives from the state of Oklahoma, which was set to be admitted to the Union on November 16, 1907. Members were elected to short terms that would last the remainder of the 60th Congress.

Oregon

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Oregon 1 Willis C. Hawley Republican 1906 Incumbent re-elected.
Oregon 2 Nicholas J. Sinnott Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Oregon 3 Clifton N. McArthur Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Oregon

List of United States representatives from Oregon

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of Oregon. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Oregon. The list of names is complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented both the state and the territory, both past and present.

Oregon's 1st congressional district

Oregon's 1st congressional district

Oregon's 1st congressional district is a congressional district located in the U.S state of Oregon. The district stretches from Portland's western suburbs and exurbs, to parts of the Oregon coast. The district includes the principal cities of Beaverton, Hillsboro, and Tigard, all located in the Portland metropolitan area. Geographically, the district is located in the northwest corner of Oregon. It includes Clatsop, Columbia, Washington, and Yamhill counties, and a portion of southwest Multnomah County in Portland.

Willis C. Hawley

Willis C. Hawley

Willis Chatman Hawley was an American politician and educator in the state of Oregon. A native of the state, he would serve as president of Willamette University in Salem, Oregon, where he earned his undergraduate and law degrees before entering politics. A Republican, he served as a member of the United States House of Representatives from Oregon from 1907 to 1933 where he co-sponsored the Smoot–Hawley Tariff Act in 1930.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Oregon's 2nd congressional district

Oregon's 2nd congressional district

Oregon's 2nd congressional district is the largest of Oregon's six districts, and is the seventh largest district in the nation. It is the second-largest congressional district in the nation that does not cover an entire state, and has been represented by Republican Cliff Bentz of Ontario since 2021.

Nicholas J. Sinnott

Nicholas J. Sinnott

Nicholas John Sinnott was an American lawyer and politician who served as a United States representative from Oregon from 1913 to 1928. He was later appointed by President Calvin Coolidge to be a Judge on the Court of Claims, serving from 1928 to 1929.

Oregon's 3rd congressional district

Oregon's 3rd congressional district

Oregon's 3rd congressional district covers most of Multnomah County, including Gresham, Troutdale, and most of Portland east of the Willamette River. It also includes the northeastern part of Clackamas County and all of Hood River County. Generally, most of Portland east of the Willamette River is in the 3rd District.

Clifton N. McArthur

Clifton N. McArthur

Clifton Nesmith McArthur was a U.S. Representative from Oregon, and grandson of Senator James Willis Nesmith. His father was a member of the Oregon Supreme Court, and Clifton twice served as Speaker of the Oregon House of Representatives.

Pennsylvania

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Pennsylvania 1 William S. Vare Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 2 George S. Graham Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 3 J. Hampton Moore Republican 1906 Incumbent died in office.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Pennsylvania 4 George W. Edmonds Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 5 Peter E. Costello Republican 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Pennsylvania 6 George P. Darrow Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 7 Thomas S. Butler Republican 1896 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 8 Henry Winfield Watson Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 9 William Walton Griest Republican 1908 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 10 Patrick McLane Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 11 John J. Casey Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 12 John Reber Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY John Reber (Republican) 55.2%
  • Thomas J. Butler (Democratic) 44.8%
Pennsylvania 13 Arthur Granville Dewalt Democratic 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 14 Louis T. McFadden Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 15 Edgar R. Kiess Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 16 John V. Lesher Democratic 1912 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 17 Benjamin K. Focht Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 18 Aaron Shenk Kreider Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 19 John M. Rose Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 20 Edward S. Brooks Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 21 Evan J. Jones Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 22 John H. Wilson Democratic 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 23 Samuel Austin Kendall Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 24 Henry Wilson Temple Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 25 Milton W. Shreve Republican 1918 Incumbent lost renomination
but re-elected as an
independent Republican.
Independent Republican gain.
  • Green tickY Milton W. Shreve (Independent Republican) 43.0%
  • Robert J. Firman (Republican) 41.0%
  • Max B. Haibach (Democratic) 11.9%
  • Charles Emmert (Socialist) 4.0%
Pennsylvania 26 Henry Joseph Steele Democratic 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 27 Nathan Leroy Strong Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 28 Willis J. Hulings Prohibition 1918 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.
Pennsylvania 29 Stephen Geyer Porter Republican 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 30 Melville Clyde Kelly Republican 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 31 John M. Morin Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania 32 Guy E. Campbell Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
Pennsylvania at-large William J. Burke Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY William J. Burke (Republican) 16.2% (Seat A)
  • Green tickY Joseph McLaughlin (Republican) 15.9% (Seat B)
  • Green tickY Anderson Howell Walters (Republican) 16.3% (Seat C)
  • Green tickY Mahlon Morris Garland (Republican) 16.1% (Seat D)
    John P. Bracken (Democratic) 6.7%
    M. J. Hanlan (Democratic) 6.6%
    Charles M. Bowman (Democratic) 6.6%
    John B. McDonough (Democratic) 6.4%
    Flora J. Diefenderfer (Prohibitionist) 1.3%
    George Hart (Prohibitionist) 1.2%
    Luther S. Kauffman (Prohibitionist) 1.2%
    Charles J. Bauer (Socialist) 1.0%
    A. M. Buckwalter (Socialist) 1.0%
    Edward W. Hayden (Socialist) 0.9%
    Henry W. Schlegel (Socialist) 0.9%
    F. E. Whittlesey (Prohibitionist) 0.9%
    Frieda S. Miller (Labor) 0.4%
  • Howard Cessna (Labor) 0.3%
  • William A. Hagan (SingleTax) 0.0%
  • William R. Kline (SingleTax) 0.0%
  • Thomas A. Kavanagh (SingleTax) 0.0%
  • Joseph E. Robinson (SingleTax) 0.0%
  • Joseph P. Smith (Independent) 0.0%
  • Frank Kalcec (Independent) 0.0%
  • Joseph Rack (Independent) 0.0%
  • Herman Spittal (Independent) 0.0%
Thomas S. Crago Republican 1914 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Republican hold.
Anderson Howell Walters Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
Mahlon Morris Garland Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Pennsylvania

List of United States representatives from Pennsylvania

The following is a list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Pennsylvania. The list has been updated periodically to reflect changes in membership; current entries are for members of the 118th Congress.

Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district

Pennsylvania's 1st congressional district

Pennsylvania's first congressional district includes all of Bucks County and a sliver of Montgomery County in southeastern Pennsylvania. It has been represented by Brian Fitzpatrick since 2019.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district

Pennsylvania's 2nd congressional district

Pennsylvania's second congressional district includes all of Northeast Philadelphia and parts of North Philadelphia east of Broad Street, as well as portions of Philadelphia's River Wards. It has been represented by Democrat Brendan Boyle since 2019.

Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district

Pennsylvania's 3rd congressional district

Pennsylvania's third congressional district includes several areas of the city of Philadelphia, including West Philadelphia, most of Center City, and parts of North Philadelphia. It has been represented by Democrat Dwight Evans since 2019. With a 2022 Cook Partisan Voting Index of D+39, it is the third most Democratic district in the nation.

J. Hampton Moore

J. Hampton Moore

Joseph Hampton Moore was the 108th and 111th Mayor of Philadelphia and a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Pennsylvania.

Harry C. Ransley

Harry C. Ransley

Harry Clay Ransley was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from Pennsylvania, serving eight terms from 1921 to 1937.

Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district

Pennsylvania's 4th congressional district

Pennsylvania's fourth congressional district, effective January 3, 2023, encompasses the majority of Montgomery County and most of Berks County northeast of Reading in southeastern Pennsylvania. In the 2020 redistricting cycle, the Pennsylvania district pushed northwards, further into Berks County, effective with the 2022 elections. The area has been represented by Democrat Madeleine Dean since 2013. The fourth district was previously in the south-central part of the state, covering all of Adams and York counties, as well as parts of Cumberland and Dauphin counties, with representation by Republican Scott Perry.

George W. Edmonds

George W. Edmonds

George Washington Edmonds was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania.

Rhode Island

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Rhode Island 1 Clark Burdick Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
  • Green tickY Clark Burdick (Republican) 67.9%
  • Patrick J. Boyle (Democratic) 32.1%
Rhode Island 2 Walter R. Stiness Republican 1914 Incumbent re-elected.
Rhode Island 3 Ambrose Kennedy Republican 1912 Incumbent re-elected.

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List of United States representatives from Rhode Island

List of United States representatives from Rhode Island

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the State of Rhode Island. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from Rhode Island. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete.

Rhode Island's 1st congressional district

Rhode Island's 1st congressional district

Rhode Island's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Rhode Island. It includes all of Bristol and Newport counties, along with parts of Providence County, including most of the city of Providence.

Clark Burdick

Clark Burdick

Clark Burdick was a U.S. Representative from Rhode Island.

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district

Rhode Island's 2nd congressional district is a congressional district in southern and western Rhode Island. The district is currently represented by Democrat Seth Magaziner, who has represented the district since January 2023.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Socialist Labor Party of America

Socialist Labor Party of America

The Socialist Labor Party (SLP) is the first socialist political party in the United States, established in 1876.

Rhode Island's 3rd congressional district

Rhode Island's 3rd congressional district

Rhode Island's 3rd congressional district is an obsolete district. It had a short tenure (1913–1933). In its final configuration, it covered Providence and most of its inner ring suburbs. It was eliminated after the 1930 Census and split between the 1st and 2nd districts. The 3rd's last representative, Francis Condon subsequently won re-election in the 1st district.

Ambrose Kennedy

Ambrose Kennedy

Ambrose Patrick Kennedy was a U.S. Representative from Rhode Island.

South Carolina

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
South Carolina 1 Richard S. Whaley Democratic 1913 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
South Carolina 2 James F. Byrnes Democratic 1910 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 3 Frederick H. Dominick Democratic 1916 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 4 Samuel J. Nicholls Democratic 1915 Incumbent retired.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.
South Carolina 5 William F. Stevenson Democratic 1917 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 6 Philip H. Stoll Democratic 1919 Incumbent re-elected.
South Carolina 7 Edward C. Mann Democratic 1919 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Democratic hold.

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1920 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

1920 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

The 1920 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina were held on November 2, 1920 to select seven Representatives for two-year terms from the state of South Carolina. Four incumbents were re-elected and all three open seats were retained by the Democrats. The composition of the state delegation thus remained solely Democratic.

List of United States representatives from South Carolina

List of United States representatives from South Carolina

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of South Carolina. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from South Carolina.

South Carolina's 1st congressional district

South Carolina's 1st congressional district

The 1st congressional district of South Carolina is a coastal congressional district in South Carolina, represented by Republican Nancy Mace since January 3, 2021. She succeeded Democrat Joe Cunningham, having defeated him in the 2020 election. Cunningham was the first Democrat to represent the district since the 1980s.

Richard S. Whaley

Richard S. Whaley

Richard Smith Whaley was a United States representative from South Carolina and Chief Justice of the Court of Claims.

South Carolina's 2nd congressional district

South Carolina's 2nd congressional district

The 2nd congressional district of South Carolina is in central and southwestern South Carolina. The district spans from Columbia to the South Carolina side of the Augusta, Georgia metropolitan area.

James F. Byrnes

James F. Byrnes

James Francis Byrnes was an American judge and politician from South Carolina. A member of the Democratic Party, he served in U.S. Congress and on the U.S. Supreme Court, as well as in the executive branch, most prominently as the 49th U.S. Secretary of State under President Harry S. Truman. Byrnes was also the 104th governor of South Carolina, making him one of the very few politicians to have served in the highest levels of all three branches of the American federal government while also being active in state government.

1910 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

1910 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

The 1910 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina were held on November 8, 1910, to select seven Representatives for two-year terms from the state of South Carolina. Six incumbents were re-elected and the open seat in the 2nd congressional district was retained by the Democrats. The composition of the state delegation thus remained solely Democratic.

South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

South Carolina's 3rd congressional district

The 3rd congressional district of South Carolina is a congressional district in western South Carolina bordering both Georgia and North Carolina. It includes all of Abbeville, Anderson, Edgefield, Greenwood, Laurens, McCormick, Oconee, Pickens and Saluda counties and portions of Greenville and Newberry counties. The district is mostly rural, but much of the economy revolves around the manufacturing centers of Anderson and Greenwood.

Frederick H. Dominick

Frederick H. Dominick

Frederick Haskell Dominick, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives for South Carolina's 3rd congressional district. He served for eight terms from 1917 to 1933.

1916 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

1916 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

The 1916 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina were held on November 7, 1916 to select seven Representatives for two-year terms from the state of South Carolina. The primary elections were held on August 29 and the runoff elections were held two weeks later on September 12. Six incumbents were re-elected, but Wyatt Aiken of the 3rd congressional district was defeated in the Democratic primary. The seat was retained by the Democrats and the composition of the state delegation remained solely Democratic.

Samuel J. Nicholls

Samuel J. Nicholls

Samuel Jones Nicholls was a United States representative from South Carolina. He was born in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He attended Bingham Military Institute in Asheville, North Carolina; Wofford College, in Spartanburg, South Carolina; Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg, Virginia; and the University of Chicago Law School. He was admitted to the bar in 1906 and commenced practice in Spartanburg.

John J. McSwain

John J. McSwain

John Jackson McSwain was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina.

South Dakota

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
South Dakota 1 Charles A. Christopherson Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
South Dakota 2 Royal C. Johnson Republican 1918 Incumbent re-elected.
South Dakota 3 Harry L. Gandy Democratic 1914 Incumbent lost re-election.
New member elected.
Republican gain.

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List of United States representatives from South Dakota

List of United States representatives from South Dakota

The following is an alphabetical list of members of the United States House of Representatives from the state of South Dakota. For chronological tables of members of both houses of the United States Congress from the state, see United States congressional delegations from South Dakota. The list of names should be complete, but other data may be incomplete. It includes members who have represented only the state both past and present, as the Dakota Territory encompassed in addition North Dakota, and parts of present-day Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho.

South Dakota's 1st congressional district

South Dakota's 1st congressional district

South Dakota's 1st congressional district is an obsolete congressional district that existed from 1913 to 1983.

Charles A. Christopherson

Charles A. Christopherson

Charles Andrew Christopherson was an American lawyer and politician in South Dakota. He was elected to the state legislature in 1912. In 1918 he was elected to the United States House of Representatives, where he was re-elected to a total of seven terms until being defeated in 1932, during the Great Depression.

1918 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

1918 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina

The 1918 United States House of Representatives elections in South Carolina were held on November 5, 1918 to select seven Representatives for two-year terms from the state of South Carolina. The primary elections were held on August 27 and the runoff elections were held two weeks later on September 10. All seven incumbents were re-elected and the composition of the state delegation remained solely Democratic.

Nonpartisan League

Nonpartisan League

The Nonpartisan League (NPL) was a left-wing political party founded in 1915 in North Dakota by Arthur C. Townley, a former organizer for the Socialist Party of America. On behalf of small farmers and merchants, the Nonpartisan League advocated state control of mills, grain elevators, banks and other farm-related industries in order to reduce the power of corporate and political interests from Minneapolis and Chicago.

South Dakota's 2nd congressional district

South Dakota's 2nd congressional district

South Dakota's 2nd congressional district is an obsolete district. It was created after the 1910 census and abolished after the 1980 census. Members were elected at-large until the formation of individual districts after the 1910 census. From 1913 until 1933, the 2nd district covered much of northeastern South Dakota, including the cities of Aberdeen, Brookings, Huron, and Watertown. When South Dakota's 3rd congressional district was eliminated after the 1930 census, the 2nd district was relocated to cover all of the counties in South Dakota west of the Missouri River. Population changes eventually moved the district's boundaries further east. During the 97th Congress, it covered all but the 21 easternmost counties in the state.

Royal C. Johnson

Royal C. Johnson

Royal Cleaves Johnson was a U.S. Representative from South Dakota and a highly decorated veteran of World War I while he was still a member of Congress. Despite voting against United States declaration of war on Germany, he took a leave of absence from Congress to enlist. He became a highly decorated veteran receiving the Distinguished Service Cross from the United States government. He also received the War Cross 1914–1918 from the French government.

South Dakota's 3rd congressional district

South Dakota's 3rd congressional district

South Dakota's 3rd congressional district is an obsolete United States congressional district. It was created after the 1910 census and abolished after the 1930 census. The district covered all of the counties in South Dakota west of the Missouri River.

William Williamson (American politician)

William Williamson (American politician)

William Williamson was an American teacher, a lawyer, a and judge who served as a U.S. Representative from South Dakota from 1921 to 1933. He was the last U.S. Representative from the third district of South Dakota.

Tennessee

District Incumbent This race
Representative Party First elected Results Candidates
Tennessee 1 Sam R. Sells Republican 1910 Incumbent lost renomination.
New member elected.
Republican hold.