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1914 New York state election

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1914 New York gubernatorial election

← 1912 November 3, 1914 1916 →
  Portrait of Charles S. Whitman.jpg Martin H. Glynn.jpg William Sulzer, portrait taken by Chicago studio.jpg
Nominee Charles S. Whitman Martin Glynn William Sulzer
Party Republican Democratic American
Alliance Independence
Independent
Prohibition
Independent
Popular vote 686,701 541,269 126,270
Percentage 47.69% 37.59% 8.77%

1914 New York gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Whitman:      30–40%      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%
Glynn:      40–50%      50–60%
Sulzer:      30–40%

Governor before election

Martin Glynn
Democratic

Elected Governor

Charles S. Whitman
Republican

The 1914 New York state election was held on November 3, 1914, to elect the governor, the lieutenant governor, the Secretary of State, the state comptroller, the attorney general, the state treasurer, the state engineer, a U.S. Senator and a judge[1] of the New York Court of Appeals, as well as all members of the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate, and delegates-at-large to the New York State Constitutional Convention of 1915.

Discover more about 1914 New York state election related topics

Governor of New York

Governor of New York

The governor of New York is the head of government of the U.S. state of New York. The governor is the head of the executive branch of New York's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has a duty to enforce state laws and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the New York Legislature, to convene the legislature and grant pardons, except in cases of impeachment and treason. The governor is the highest paid governor in the country.

Lieutenant Governor of New York

Lieutenant Governor of New York

The lieutenant governor of New York is a constitutional office in the executive branch of the Government of the State of New York. It is the second highest-ranking official in state government. The lieutenant governor is elected on a ticket with the governor for a four-year term. Official duties dictated to the lieutenant governor under the present New York Constitution are to serve as president of the state senate, serve as acting governor in the absence of the governor from the state or the disability of the governor, or to become governor in the event of the governor's death, resignation or removal from office via impeachment. Additional statutory duties of the lieutenant governor are to serve on the New York Court for the Trial of Impeachments, the State Defense Council, and on the board of trustees of the College of Environmental Science and Forestry. The lieutenant governor of New York is the highest-paid lieutenant governor in the country.

Secretary of State of New York

Secretary of State of New York

The secretary of state of New York is a cabinet officer in the government of the U.S. state of New York who leads the Department of State (NYSDOS).

New York State Comptroller

New York State Comptroller

The New York State Comptroller is an elected constitutional officer of the U.S. state of New York and head of the New York state government's Department of Audit and Control. The New York State Comptroller is the highest-paid state auditor or treasurer in the country. Sixty-one individuals have held the office of State Comptroller since statehood. The incumbent is Thomas DiNapoli, a Democrat.

Attorney General of New York

Attorney General of New York

The attorney general of New York is the chief legal officer of the U.S. state of New York and head of the Department of Law of the state government. The office has been in existence in some form since 1626, under the Dutch colonial government of New Netherland. The attorney general of the State of New York is the highest-paid state attorney general in the country.

New York State Treasurer

New York State Treasurer

The New York State Treasurer was a state cabinet officer in the State of New York between 1776 and 1926. During the re-organization of the state government under Governor Al Smith, the office was abolished and its responsibilities transferred to the new Department of Audit and Control headed to the New York State Comptroller.

New York State Engineer and Surveyor

New York State Engineer and Surveyor

The New York State Engineer and Surveyor was a state cabinet officer in the State of New York between 1848 and 1926. During the re-organization of the state government under Governor Al Smith, the office was abolished and its responsibilities transferred to the New York State Department of Public Works, which in turn was absorbed by the New York State Department of Transportation in 1967.

New York Court of Appeals

New York Court of Appeals

The New York Court of Appeals is the highest court in the Unified Court System of the State of New York. The Court of Appeals consists of seven judges: the Chief Judge and six Associate Judges who are appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the State Senate to 14-year terms. The Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals also heads administration of the state's court system, and thus is also known as the Chief Judge of the State of New York. Its 1842 Neoclassical courthouse is located in New York's capital, Albany.

New York State Assembly

New York State Assembly

The New York State Assembly is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, with the New York State Senate being the upper house. There are 150 seats in the Assembly. Assembly members serve two-year terms without term limits.

New York State Senate

New York State Senate

The New York State Senate is the upper house of the New York State Legislature; the New York State Assembly is its lower house. Its members are elected to two-year terms; there are no term limits. There are 63 seats in the Senate.

History

This was the first time that U.S. Senators from New York were elected by general ballot. Until 1911, the U.S. Senators had been elected by the New York State Legislature, but the lengthy stalemate between Tammany and a faction led by State Senator Franklin D. Roosevelt, who was decided to impede the election of William F. Sheehan or any other crony of Tammany boss Charles F. Murphy, led to a constitutional amendment. Since 1914, the U.S. Senators have been elected with the state officers on the state ticket, and selected in the party primaries.

The Socialist state convention met on July 5 at Rochester, New York. They nominated Charles Edward Russell for U.S. Senator; Gustave Adolph Strebel for governor; Stephen J. Mahoney, of Buffalo, for lieutenant governor; Mrs. Florence C. Kitchelt, of Rochester, for secretary of state; Charles W. Noonan, of Schenectady, for comptroller; James C. Sheehan, of Albany, for treasurer; Frederick O. Haller, of Buffalo, for attorney general; Prof. Vladimir Karapetoff, of Cornell University, for state engineer; and Louis B. Boudin for the Court of Appeals.[2]

The Prohibition State Committee met on August 15 at Syracuse, New York, and voted to nominate Ex-Governor William Sulzer for governor instead of the previously selected Charles E. Welch, who then ran for lieutenant governor.[3]

This was the first state election at which the parties with "party status" - at this time, the Democratic, Republican and Progressive parties - were required to hold primary elections to nominate candidates for state offices. The primaries were held on September 28.[4]

Republican primary

1914 Republican primary results
Office
Governor Charles S. Whitman 120,073 Harvey D. Hinman 61,952 Job E. Hedges 43,012
Lieutenant Governor Edward Schoeneck 78,563 Seth G. Heacock 68,303 Frank A. Sidway 57,348
Secretary of State Francis M. Hugo 71,037 William D. Cunningham[5] 67,050 Eugene H. Porter[6] 58,845
Comptroller Eugene M. Travis 88,765 James Hooker 62,414 Samuel Strasburger 48,519
Attorney General Egburt E. Woodbury 124,009 Edward R. O'Malley 72,467
Treasurer James L. Wells 184,043
State Engineer Frank M. Williams 159,243 Arthur O'Brien 36,892
Judge of the Court of Appeals Emory A. Chase 180,394
U.S. Senator James W. Wadsworth, Jr. 89,960 William M. Calder 82,895 David Jayne Hill 37,102

Democratic primary

1914 Democratic primary results
Office
Governor Martin H. Glynn 175,772 John A. Hennessy 68,387
Lieutenant Governor Thomas B. Lockwood 158,159 William Gorham Rice 57,305
Secretary of State Mitchell May 167,198 Sidney Newborg 43,251
Comptroller William Sohmer 158,309 George G. Davidson, Jr. 58,077
Attorney General James A. Parsons 151,122 John Larkin 57,096
Treasurer Albert C. Carp 147,443 Charles E. Sunderlin 55,055
State Engineer John A. Bensel 146,533 Raleigh Bennett 58,485
Judge of the Court of Appeals Samuel Seabury 139,694 John N. Carlisle 65,820
U.S. Senator James W. Gerard 138,815 Franklin D. Roosevelt 63,879 James F. McDonough 17,862

Progressive primary

1914 Progressive primary results
Office
Governor Frederick M. Davenport 18,643 William Sulzer 14,366

The other Progressive candidates were nominated unopposed.

The Socialist Labor ticket was filed with the Secretary of State on October 9, 1914.[7] They nominated a full ticket.[8]

Ex-Governor Sulzer's aim was to defeat Glynn whom he considered a back-stabber. For this purpose he organized the American Party, and accepted the nomination by the Prohibition Party. He also sought the nomination of the Progressive Party, but was defeated in their primary. The American Party Executive Committee also endorsed a full slate (Prohibitionists Welch and Clements; Progressives Call and Colby; Democrat Seabury; Charles Horowitz for comptroller; Charles Podsenick for attorney general; and Robert Butler for State Engineer) for the other offices, but did not file a petition to nominate them, so they did not appear on the ballot in the American column.[9]

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New York (state)

New York (state)

New York, officially the State of New York, is a state in the Northeastern United States. It is often called New York State to distinguish it from its largest city, New York City. With a total area of 54,556 square miles (141,300 km2), New York is the 27th-largest U.S. state by area. With 20.2 million people, it is the fourth-most-populous state in the United States as of 2021, with approximately 44% living in New York City, including 25% of the state's population within Brooklyn and Queens, and another 15% on the remainder of Long Island, the most populous island in the United States. The state is bordered by New Jersey and Pennsylvania to the south, and Connecticut, Massachusetts, and Vermont to the east; it has a maritime border with Rhode Island, east of Long Island, as well as an international border with the Canadian provinces of Quebec to the north and Ontario to the northwest.

New York State Legislature

New York State Legislature

The New York State Legislature consists of the two houses that act as the state legislature of the U.S. state of New York: The New York State Senate and the New York State Assembly. The Constitution of New York does not designate an official term for the two houses together; it says only that the state's legislative power "shall be vested in the senate and assembly". Session laws passed by the Legislature are published in the official Laws of New York. Permanent New York laws of a general nature are codified in the Consolidated Laws of New York. As of January 2021, the Democratic Party holds supermajorities in both houses of the New York State Legislature, which is the highest paid state legislature in the country.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt, often referred to by his initials FDR, was an American politician and attorney who served as the 32nd president of the United States from 1933 until his death in 1945. As the leader of the Democratic Party, he won a record four presidential elections and became a central figure in world events during the first half of the 20th century. Roosevelt directed the federal government during most of the Great Depression, implementing his New Deal domestic agenda in response to the worst economic crisis in U.S. history. He built the New Deal Coalition, which defined modern liberalism in the United States throughout the middle third of the 20th century. His third and fourth terms were dominated by World War II, which ended in victory shortly after he died in office.

Charles Francis Murphy

Charles Francis Murphy

Charles Francis "Silent Charlie" Murphy, also known as Boss Murphy, was an American political figure. He was also the longest-serving head of New York City's Tammany Hall, a position he served from 1902 to 1924. Murphy was responsible for transforming Tammany Hall's image from one of corruption to respectability as well as extending Tammany Hall's political influence to the national level. Murphy was responsible for the election of three mayors of New York City, three governors of New York State, and two U.S. senators, even though he was never listed as a leader of Tammany Hall.

Rochester, New York

Rochester, New York

Rochester is a city in the U.S. state of New York, the seat of Monroe County, and the fourth-most populous in the state after New York City, Buffalo, and Yonkers, with a population of 211,328 as enumerated in the 2020 United States census. Located in Western New York, the city of Rochester forms the core of a larger metropolitan area with a population of 1 million people, across six counties. The city was one of the United States' first boomtowns, initially due to the fertile Genesee River Valley, which gave rise to numerous flour mills, and then as a manufacturing center, which spurred further rapid population growth.

Gustave Adolph Strebel

Gustave Adolph Strebel

Gustave Adolph Strebel was president of the New York State Congress of Industrial Organizations. He was the Socialist Party of America candidate for Governor of New York in the New York state election of 1914.

Buffalo, New York

Buffalo, New York

Buffalo is the second-largest city in the U.S. state of New York and the seat of Erie County. It is at the eastern end of Lake Erie, at the head of the Niagara River, and is across the Canadian border from Southern Ontario. With a population of 278,349 according to the 2020 census, Buffalo is the 78th-largest city in the United States. The city and nearby Niagara Falls together make up the two-county Buffalo–Niagara Falls Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which had an estimated population of 1.1 million in 2020, making it the 49th largest MSA in the United States. Buffalo is in Western New York, which is the largest population and economic center between Boston and Cleveland.

Schenectady, New York

Schenectady, New York

Schenectady is a city in Schenectady County, New York, United States, of which it is the county seat. As of the 2020 census, the city's population of 67,047 made it the state's ninth-largest city by population. The city is in eastern New York, near the confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson rivers. It is in the same metropolitan area as the state capital, Albany, which is about 15 miles (24 km) southeast.

Albany, New York

Albany, New York

Albany is the capital of the U.S. state of New York, also the seat and largest city of Albany County. Albany is on the west bank of the Hudson River, about 10 miles (16 km) south of its confluence with the Mohawk River, and about 135 miles (220 km) north of New York City.

Cornell University

Cornell University

Cornell University is a private Ivy League and statutory land-grant research university based in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, Cornell was founded with the intention to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge—from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. Cornell is ranked among the most prestigious universities in the world. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's founding principle, a popular 1868 quotation from founder Ezra Cornell: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."

Louis B. Boudin

Louis B. Boudin

Louis B. Boudin was a Russian-born American Marxist theoretician, writer, politician, and lawyer. He is best remembered as the author of a two volume history of the Supreme Court's influence on American government, first published in 1932.

Prohibition Party

Prohibition Party

The Prohibition Party (PRO) is a political party in the United States known for its historic opposition to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages and as an integral part of the temperance movement. It is the oldest existing third party in the United States and the third-longest active party.

Result

Almost the whole Republican ticket was elected; only Justice Seabury managed to defeat the Republican candidate Emory A. Chase.

The incumbents Glynn, May, Sohmer, Parsons, Call and Bensel were defeated.

The Republican, Democratic, Independence League, Progressive, Socialist and Prohibition parties maintained automatic ballot access (necessary 10,000 votes for governor), the American Party attained it, and the Socialist Labor Party did not re-attain it.

34 Republicans and 17 Democrats were elected to a two-year term (1915–16) in the New York State Senate.

100 Republicans, 49 Democrats and one Progressive[10] were elected for the session of 1915 to the New York State Assembly.

1914 state election results
Office Republican ticket Democratic ticket Independence League ticket American ticket Prohibition ticket Progressive ticket Socialist ticket Social Labor[11] ticket
Governor Charles S. Whitman 686,701 Martin H. Glynn 412,253 Martin H. Glynn 125,252 William Sulzer 70,655 William Sulzer 54,189 Frederick M. Davenport 45,686 Gustave Adolph Strebel 37,793 James T. Hunter[12] 2,350
Lieutenant Governor Edward Schoeneck 622,493 Thomas B. Lockwood[13] 534,660 Edward Schoeneck (none) Charles E. Welch[14] 44,484 Chauncey J. Hamlin 113,385 Stephen J. Mahoney[15] 51,304 Jeremiah D. Crowley[16] 3,566
Secretary of State Francis M. Hugo 601,857 Mitchell May 561,429 Mitchell May (none) John R. Clements 68,049 Sydney W. Stern 72,371 Florence Cross Kitchelt 52,970 Edmund Moonelis[17] 3,490
Comptroller Eugene M. Travis 657,373 William Sohmer 553,254 William Sohmer (none) Neil D. Cranmer[18] 29,373 John B. Burnham 68,111 Charles W. Noonan[19] 51,845 Charles E. Berns 3,579
Attorney General Egburt E. Woodbury 651,869 James A. Parsons 529,045 Edward R. O'Malley 12,132 (none) Walter T. Bliss[20] 27,949 Robert H. Elder[21] 77,945 Frederick O. Haller 52,808 John Hall[22] 3,711
Treasurer James L. Wells 622,811 Albert C. Carp 526,025 Homer D. Call (none) Edward A. Packer 29,071 Homer D. Call 117,628 James C. Sheehan 54,202 Anthony Houtenbrink[23] 3,561
State Engineer Frank M. Williams 677,393 John A. Bensel 509,944 John Martin 9,686 (none) James Adamson 27,723 Lloyd Collis 68,110 Vladimir Karapetoff 51,980 August Gillhaus 3,676
Judge of the Court of Appeals Emory A. Chase 594,414 Samuel Seabury 650,468 Samuel Seabury (none) Coleridge A. Hart[24] 28,337 Samuel Seabury Louis B. Boudin 52,225 Edmund Seidel 5,054
U.S. Senator James W. Wadsworth, Jr. 639,112 James W. Gerard 571,419 James W. Gerard (none) Francis E. Baldwin[25] 27,813 Bainbridge Colby 61,977 Charles Edward Russell 55,266 Erwin A. Archer 3064

Obs.:

  • The vote for governor defines the ballot access.
  • Numbers are total votes on all tickets for candidates who ran on more than one ticket, except for governor.
  • Glynn also polled 3,764 votes; and Sulzer 1,426; in the "no-party column," a blank space provided for write-in candidates.

Discover more about Result related topics

Ballot access

Ballot access

Elections in the United States refers to the rules and procedures regulating the conditions under which a candidate, political party, or ballot measure is entitled to appear on voters' ballots. As the nation's election process is decentralized by Article I, Section 4, of the United States Constitution, ballot access laws are established and enforced by the states. As a result, ballot access processes may vary from one state to another. State access requirements for candidates generally pertain to personal qualities of a candidate, such as: minimum age, residency, citizenship, and being a qualified voter. Additionally, many states require prospective candidates to collect a specified number of qualified voters' signatures on petitions of support and mandate the payment of filing fees before granting access; ballot measures are similarly regulated. Each state also regulates how political parties qualify for automatic ballot access, and how those minor parties that do not can. Fundamental to democracy, topics related to ballot access are the subject of considerable debate in the United States.

New York State Senate

New York State Senate

The New York State Senate is the upper house of the New York State Legislature; the New York State Assembly is its lower house. Its members are elected to two-year terms; there are no term limits. There are 63 seats in the Senate.

New York State Assembly

New York State Assembly

The New York State Assembly is the lower house of the New York State Legislature, with the New York State Senate being the upper house. There are 150 seats in the Assembly. Assembly members serve two-year terms without term limits.

American Party (1914)

American Party (1914)

The American Party was a short-lived minor political party during the early 20th century. It was "formed by a number of disgruntled Democrats and admirers of William Sulzer." The party was incorporated on April 13, 1914, at Albany.

Prohibition Party

Prohibition Party

The Prohibition Party (PRO) is a political party in the United States known for its historic opposition to the sale or consumption of alcoholic beverages and as an integral part of the temperance movement. It is the oldest existing third party in the United States and the third-longest active party.

Progressive Party (United States, 1912)

Progressive Party (United States, 1912)

The Progressive Party was a third party in the United States formed in 1912 by former president Theodore Roosevelt after he lost the presidential nomination of the Republican Party to his former protégé rival, incumbent president William Howard Taft. The new party was known for taking advanced positions on progressive reforms and attracting leading national reformers. The party was also ideologically deeply connected with America's indigenous radical-liberal tradition.

Socialist Party of America

Socialist Party of America

The Socialist Party of America (SPA) was a socialist political party in the United States formed in 1901 by a merger between the three-year-old Social Democratic Party of America and disaffected elements of the Socialist Labor Party of America who had split from the main organization in 1899.

Socialist Labor Party of America

Socialist Labor Party of America

The Socialist Labor Party (SLP) is the first socialist political party in the United States, established in 1876.

Governor of New York

Governor of New York

The governor of New York is the head of government of the U.S. state of New York. The governor is the head of the executive branch of New York's state government and the commander-in-chief of the state's military forces. The governor has a duty to enforce state laws and the power to either approve or veto bills passed by the New York Legislature, to convene the legislature and grant pardons, except in cases of impeachment and treason. The governor is the highest paid governor in the country.

Martin H. Glynn

Martin H. Glynn

Martin Henry Glynn was an American politician. He was the 40th Governor of New York from 1913 to 1914, the first Irish American Roman Catholic head of government of what was then the most populated state of the United States. A Democrat, he signed a number of important reforms, including the direct primary and labor laws.

Gustave Adolph Strebel

Gustave Adolph Strebel

Gustave Adolph Strebel was president of the New York State Congress of Industrial Organizations. He was the Socialist Party of America candidate for Governor of New York in the New York state election of 1914.

Lieutenant Governor of New York

Lieutenant Governor of New York

The lieutenant governor of New York is a constitutional office in the executive branch of the Government of the State of New York. It is the second highest-ranking official in state government. The lieutenant governor is elected on a ticket with the governor for a four-year term. Official duties dictated to the lieutenant governor under the present New York Constitution are to serve as president of the state senate, serve as acting governor in the absence of the governor from the state or the disability of the governor, or to become governor in the event of the governor's death, resignation or removal from office via impeachment. Additional statutory duties of the lieutenant governor are to serve on the New York Court for the Trial of Impeachments, the State Defense Council, and on the board of trustees of the College of Environmental Science and Forestry. The lieutenant governor of New York is the highest-paid lieutenant governor in the country.

Source: "1914 New York state election", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2022, November 25th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1914_New_York_state_election.

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Notes
  1. ^ to fill the vacancy caused by the election of Willard Bartlett as Chief Judge
  2. ^ C. E. RUSSELL FOR SENATOR in NYT on July 6, 1914
  3. ^ SULZER HEADS DRY TICKET in NYT on August 16, 1914
  4. ^ RESULTS OF PRIMARIES in NYT on September 29, 1914
  5. ^ William D. Cunningham, of Ulster County, ran for comptroller in 1912
  6. ^ Dr. Eugene H. Porter, State Commissioner of Health
  7. ^ SOCIALIST LABOR TICKET in NYT on October 10, 1914
  8. ^ SILVERSMITH FOR GOVERNOR in NYT on October 25, 1914
  9. ^ SULZER DOMINATES HIS AMERICAN PARTY in NYT on October 25, 1914
  10. ^ The Progressive member was Hamilton Fish III who had run also on the Democratic ticket in his district.
  11. ^ The election law limited the name of any party on the ballot to eleven letters, so that the "Socialist Labor" had to be shortened to "Social Labor"
  12. ^ James T. Hunter (1870-1952), silversmith, ran also for Mayor of New York City in 1903, and for lieutenant governor in 1910 Obit in NYT on January 7, 1952 (subscription required)
  13. ^ Thomas B. Lockwood, son of Daniel N. Lockwood
  14. ^ Charles E. Welch, grape juice manufacturer, of Westfield, ran also for governor in 1916
  15. ^ Stephen J. Mahoney, ran also in 1916
  16. ^ Jeremiah D. Crowley, of Marcellus, ran also for state engineer in 1910, and for lieutenant governor in 1912
  17. ^ Edmund Moonelis, ran also in 1912
  18. ^ Neil Dow Cranmer, of Elmira, ran also for comptroller in 1914 and 1926; for secretary of state in 1916; and for Congress at-large in 1940
  19. ^ Charles W. Noonan, of Schenectady, Alderman from Schenectady's 7th Ward, ran also for comptroller in 1914, 1916 and 1926; for treasurer in 1918; for secretary of state in 1920; for lieutenant governor in 1932; and for Congress at-large in 1934
  20. ^ Walter T. Bliss, ran also for the Court of Appeals in 1917
  21. ^ Robert H. Elder, ran also in 1916
  22. ^ John Hall, ran also for attorney general in 1908, and Governor in 1912
  23. ^ Anthony Houtenbrink, ran also for comptroller in 1916
  24. ^ Coleridge Allen Hart (b. July 11, 1852 Peekskill), lawyer, of Brooklyn, ran also for attorney general in 1889; for the Court of Appeals in 1907, 1908, 1914, 1916, 1917 and 1920; and for the U.S. Senate in 1922
  25. ^ Francis E. Baldwin (1859-1930), of Elmira, financier, ran also for governor in 1894; for chief judge in 1897; for attorney general in 1910 and 1922; and for the Court of Appeals in 1920, F.E. BALDWIN IS DEAD; ELMIRA (N.Y.) FINANCIER in NYT on December 23, 1930 (subscription required)
Sources

Vote totals from New York Red Book 1915

See also

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