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103rd Street–Corona Plaza station

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 103 Street–Corona Plaza
 "7" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
103 Street Flushing vc.jpg
Platform view
Station statistics
Address103rd Street & Roosevelt Avenue
Queens, NY 11368
BoroughQueens
LocaleCorona
Coordinates40°44′59.37″N 73°51′45.84″W / 40.7498250°N 73.8627333°W / 40.7498250; -73.8627333Coordinates: 40°44′59.37″N 73°51′45.84″W / 40.7498250°N 73.8627333°W / 40.7498250; -73.8627333
DivisionA (IRT)[1]
Line   IRT Flushing Line
Services   7 all times (all times)
TransitBus transport MTA Bus: Q23
StructureElevated
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks3
Other information
OpenedApril 21, 1917; 105 years ago (1917-04-21)
Opposite-
direction
transfer
Yes
Former/other namesAlburtis Avenue[2]
104th Street
Traffic
20196,399,657[4]Increase 1.3%
Rank64 out of 424[4]
Location
103rd Street–Corona Plaza station is located in New York City Subway
103rd Street–Corona Plaza station
103rd Street–Corona Plaza station is located in New York City
103rd Street–Corona Plaza station
103rd Street–Corona Plaza station is located in New York
103rd Street–Corona Plaza station
Track layout

Street map

Station service legend
Symbol Description
Stops all times Stops all times

The 103rd Street–Corona Plaza station is a local station on the IRT Flushing Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of 103rd Street and Roosevelt Avenue.[5] It is served by the 7 train at all times.[6]

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Metro station

Metro station

A metro station or subway station is a train station for a rapid transit system, which as a whole is usually called a "metro" or "subway". A station provides a means for passengers to purchase tickets, board trains, and evacuate the system in the case of an emergency. In the United Kingdom, they are known as underground stations, most commonly used in reference to the London Underground.

IRT Flushing Line

IRT Flushing Line

The IRT Flushing Line is a rapid transit route of the New York City Subway system, named for its eastern terminal in Flushing, Queens. It is operated as part of the A Division. The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), a private operator, had constructed the section of the line from Flushing, Queens, to Times Square, Manhattan between 1915 and 1928. A western extension was opened to Hudson Yards in western Manhattan in 2015, and the line now stretches from Flushing to Chelsea, Manhattan. It carries trains of the 7 local service, as well as the express <7> during rush hours in the peak direction. It is the only currently operational IRT line to serve Queens.

New York City Subway

New York City Subway

The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system in the New York City boroughs of Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. It is owned by the government of New York City and leased to the New York City Transit Authority, an affiliate agency of the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Opened on October 27, 1904, the New York City Subway is one of the world's oldest public transit systems, one of the most-used, and the one with the most stations, with 472 stations in operation.

7 (New York City Subway service)

7 (New York City Subway service)

The 7 Flushing Local and <7> Flushing Express are two rapid transit services in the A Division of the New York City Subway, providing local and express services along the full length of the IRT Flushing Line. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored purple, since they serve the Flushing Line.

History

Early history

The 1913 Dual Contracts called for the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) and Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT; later Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation, or BMT) to build new lines in Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx. Queens did not receive many new IRT and BRT lines compared to Brooklyn and the Bronx, since the city's Public Service Commission (PSC) wanted to alleviate subway crowding in the other two boroughs first before building in Queens, which was relatively undeveloped. The IRT Flushing Line was to be one of two Dual Contracts lines in the borough, along with the Astoria Line; it would connect Flushing and Long Island City, two of Queens' oldest settlements, to Manhattan via the Steinway Tunnel. When the majority of the line was built in the early 1910s, most of the route went through undeveloped land, and Roosevelt Avenue had not been constructed.[7]: 47  Community leaders advocated for more Dual Contracts lines to be built in Queens to allow development there.[8]

This station opened on April 21, 1917, as Alburtis Avenue, as the easternmost station of an extension of the Flushing line past Queensboro Plaza.[2] It was later renamed 104th Street, giving the possibility of a sealed exit at the north end, before taking its current name of 103rd Street–Corona Plaza. This station still contains signs showing Alburtis Avenue, but which now have been covered up. This station was the eastern terminal for the joint BMT and IRT services on the line until the extension to 111th Street opened on October 13, 1925.[2][9][10][11]

Later years

The city government took over the IRT's operations on June 12, 1940.[12][13] The IRT routes were given numbered designations in 1948 with the introduction of "R-type" rolling stock, which contained rollsigns with numbered designations for each service.[14] The route from Times Square to Flushing became known as the 7.[15] On October 17, 1949, the joint BMT/IRT operation of the Flushing Line ended, and the line became the responsibility of the IRT.[16] After the end of BMT/IRT dual service, the New York City Board of Transportation announced that the Flushing Line platforms would be lengthened to 11 IRT car lengths; the platforms were only able to fit nine 51-foot-long IRT cars beforehand.[17][18] The platforms at the station were extended in 1955–1956 to accommodate 11-car trains.[19] However, nine-car trains continued to run on the 7 route until 1962, when they were extended to ten cars.[20] With the opening of the 1964 New York World's Fair, trains were lengthened to eleven cars.[21][22]

As part of the 2015–2019 Capital Program, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority would renovate the 52nd, 61st, 69th, 82nd, 103rd and 111th Streets stations, a project that has been delayed for several years but is slated to begin in mid-2020. Conditions at these stations were among the worst of all stations in the subway system.[23]

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Dual Contracts

Dual Contracts

The Dual Contracts, also known as the Dual Subway System, were contracts for the construction and/or rehabilitation and operation of rapid transit lines in the City of New York. The contracts were signed on March 19, 1913, by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company and the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company. As part of the Dual Contracts, the IRT and BRT would build or upgrade several subway lines in New York City, then operate them for 49 years.

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

Interborough Rapid Transit Company

The Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was the private operator of New York City's original underground subway line that opened in 1904, as well as earlier elevated railways and additional rapid transit lines in New York City. The IRT was purchased by the city in June 1940, along with the younger BMT and IND systems, to form the modern New York City Subway. The former IRT lines are now the A Division or IRT Division of the Subway.

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company

The Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT) was a public transit holding company formed in 1896 to acquire and consolidate railway lines in Brooklyn and Queens, New York City, United States. It was a prominent corporation and industry leader using the single-letter symbol B on the New York Stock Exchange.

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation

The Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT) was an urban transit holding company, based in Brooklyn, New York City, United States, and incorporated in 1923. The system was sold to the city in 1940. Today, together with the IND subway system, it forms the B Division of the modern New York City Subway.

Brooklyn

Brooklyn

Brooklyn is a borough of New York City, coextensive with Kings County, in the U.S. state of New York. Kings County is the most populous county in the State of New York, and the second-most densely populated county in the United States, behind New York County (Manhattan). Brooklyn is also New York City's most populous borough, with 2,736,074 residents in 2020.

BMT Astoria Line

BMT Astoria Line

The BMT Astoria Line is a rapid transit line of the B Division of the New York City Subway, serving the Queens neighborhood of Astoria. It runs south from Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria to 39th Avenue in Long Island City above 31st Street. It then turns west and serves Queensboro Plaza over Queens Plaza.

Flushing, Queens

Flushing, Queens

Flushing is a neighborhood in the north-central portion of the New York City borough of Queens. The neighborhood is the fourth-largest central business district in New York City. Downtown Flushing is a major commercial and retail area, and the intersection of Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue at its core is the third-busiest in New York City, behind Times Square and Herald Square.

Long Island City

Long Island City

Long Island City (LIC) is a residential and commercial neighborhood on the extreme western tip of Queens, a borough in New York City. It is bordered by Astoria to the north; the East River to the west; New Calvary Cemetery in Sunnyside to the east; and Newtown Creek—which separates Queens from Greenpoint, Brooklyn—to the south.

List of New York City Subway R-type contracts

List of New York City Subway R-type contracts

This is a list of all R-type contracts in the New York City Subway.

7 (New York City Subway service)

7 (New York City Subway service)

The 7 Flushing Local and <7> Flushing Express are two rapid transit services in the A Division of the New York City Subway, providing local and express services along the full length of the IRT Flushing Line. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored purple, since they serve the Flushing Line.

New York City Board of Transportation

New York City Board of Transportation

The New York City Board of Transportation or the Board of Transportation of the City of New York was a city transit commission and operator in New York City, consisting of three members appointed by the mayor. It was created in 1924 to control city-owned and operated public transportation service within the New York City Transit System. The agency oversaw the construction and operation of the municipal Independent Subway System (IND), which was constructed shortly after the Board was chartered. The BOT later presided over the major transfers of public transit from private control to municipal control that took place in the 1940s, including the unification of the New York City Subway in 1940. In 1953, the Board was dissolved and replaced by the state-operated New York City Transit Authority, now part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA).

1964 New York World's Fair

1964 New York World's Fair

The 1964–1965 New York World's Fair was a world's fair that held over 140 pavilions and 110 restaurants, representing 80 nations, 24 US states, and over 45 corporations with the goal and the final result of building exhibits or attractions at Flushing Meadows–Corona Park in Queens, New York City. The immense fair covered 646 acres (2.61 km2) on half the park, with numerous pools or fountains, and an amusement park with rides near the lake. However, the fair did not receive official support or approval from the Bureau of International Expositions (BIE).

Station layout

P
Platform level
Side platform
Southbound local "7" train toward 34th Street–Hudson Yards (Junction Boulevard)
Peak-direction express "7" express train AM rush does not stop here
"7" express train PM rush/evenings does not stop here →
Northbound local "7" train toward Flushing–Main Street (111th Street)
Side platform
M Mezzanine Fare control, station agent, MetroCard machines
G Street level Entrances/exits
Old-fashioned smaller signs on the northbound platform in April 2011.
Old-fashioned smaller signs on the northbound platform in April 2011.

This elevated station has three tracks and two side platforms.[24] The center track is used by the rush hour peak direction express service.[6] Both platforms have beige windscreens and brown canopies supported by green frames and support columns in the center and green waist-high steel fences at both ends. The station names are in the standard black plates with white lettering, though some lampposts at both ends have their original white signs in black lettering.[11][25]

Exits

This station's only entrance/exit is an elevated station house beneath the tracks. A pair of staircases from either side of Roosevelt Avenue between 103rd and 104th Streets go up to the station house, where there is a token booth in the center and a turnstile bank on either side.[26] Both turnstile banks lead to a wooden waiting area/crossunder and have a single staircase going up to either platform.[10][11]

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Side platform

Side platform

A side platform is a platform positioned to the side of one or more railway tracks or guideways at a railway station, tram stop, or transitway. A station having dual side platforms, one for each direction of travel, is the basic design used for double-track railway lines. Side platforms may result in a wider overall footprint for the station compared with an island platform where a single width of platform can be shared by riders using either track.

7 (New York City Subway service)

7 (New York City Subway service)

The 7 Flushing Local and <7> Flushing Express are two rapid transit services in the A Division of the New York City Subway, providing local and express services along the full length of the IRT Flushing Line. Their route emblems, or "bullets", are colored purple, since they serve the Flushing Line.

34th Street–Hudson Yards station

34th Street–Hudson Yards station

The 34th Street–Hudson Yards station is a New York City Subway station in Manhattan's West Side on the IRT Flushing Line, and is the western terminus for the 7 local and <7> express services. It has two tracks and one island platform, with two levels of mezzanines: one directly above the platform and the other directly below street level. The station directly serves the Hudson Yards mega-development above it, and is located within the greater Hudson Yards neighborhood. The station contains two entrances along Hudson Boulevard: a primary entrance south of 34th Street, and a secondary entrance south of 35th Street.

Junction Boulevard station

Junction Boulevard station

The Junction Boulevard station is an express station on the IRT Flushing Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of Junction Boulevard and Roosevelt Avenue in Corona, Queens. It is served by the 7 train at all times and by rush hour peak-direction <7> express service.

Flushing–Main Street station (IRT Flushing Line)

Flushing–Main Street station (IRT Flushing Line)

The Flushing–Main Street station is the eastern terminal on the IRT Flushing Line of the New York City Subway, located at Main Street and Roosevelt Avenue in Downtown Flushing, Queens. It is served by the 7 local train at all times and the <7> express train during rush hours in the peak direction.

111th Street station (IRT Flushing Line)

111th Street station (IRT Flushing Line)

The 111th Street station is a local station on the IRT Flushing Line of the New York City Subway, located at the intersection of 111th Street and Roosevelt Avenue. It is served by the 7 train at all times.

MetroCard

MetroCard

The MetroCard is a magnetic stripe card used for fare payment on transportation in the New York City area. It is a payment method for the New York City Subway, New York City Transit buses and MTA buses. The MetroCard is also accepted by several partner agencies: Nassau Inter-County Express (NICE), the PATH train system, the Roosevelt Island Tramway, AirTrain JFK, and Westchester County's Bee-Line Bus System.

Turnstile

Turnstile

A turnstile is a form of gate which allows one person to pass at a time. A turnstile can be configured to enforce one-way human traffic. In addition, a turnstile can restrict passage only to people who insert a coin, ticket, pass, or other method of payment. Modern turnstiles can incorporate biometrics, including retina scanning, fingerprints, and other individual human characteristics which can be scanned. Thus a turnstile can be used in the case of paid access, for example to access public transport, a pay toilet, or to restrict access to authorized people, for example in the lobby of an office building.

Source: "103rd Street–Corona Plaza station", Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, (2023, March 5th), https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/103rd_Street–Corona_Plaza_station.

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References
  1. ^ "Glossary". Second Avenue Subway Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement (SDEIS) (PDF). Vol. 1. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. March 4, 2003. pp. 1–2. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 26, 2021. Retrieved January 1, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c "New Rapid Transit Commission Preparing Plans for Extension of Corona Line to Flushing; Board of Estimate Has Authorized Extension of Line From Corona to New Storage Yards Near Flushing River--Queensboro Subway to Have Connection With Proposed Eighth Avenue Line Near Times Square" (PDF). The New York Times. June 12, 1921. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 18, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2015.
  3. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  5. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Corona" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 5, 2017. Retrieved September 20, 2015.
  6. ^ a b "7 Subway Timetable, Effective December 4, 2022". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved February 6, 2023.
  7. ^ Raskin, Joseph B. (2013). The Routes Not Taken: A Trip Through New York City's Unbuilt Subway System. New York, New York: Fordham University Press. doi:10.5422/fordham/9780823253692.001.0001. ISBN 978-0-82325-369-2.
  8. ^ "Move for Rapid Transit" (PDF). Newtown Register. December 2, 1909. p. 1. Retrieved September 30, 2017 – via Fultonhistory.com.
  9. ^ "First Trains to be Run on Flushing Tube Line Oct. 13: Shuttle Operation Ordered to 111th Street Station on New Extension". Newspapers.com. Brooklyn Daily Eagle. October 5, 1925. p. 8. Archived from the original on October 26, 2016. Retrieved September 20, 2015.
  10. ^ a b "www.nycsubway.org: IRT Flushing Line". www.nycsubway.org. Archived from the original on March 2, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2016.
  11. ^ a b c "7 Train". Station Reporter. August 11, 2014. Archived from the original on August 11, 2014. Retrieved February 18, 2016.
  12. ^ "City Transit Unity Is Now a Reality; Title to I.R.T. Lines Passes to Municipality, Ending 19-Year Campaign". The New York Times. June 13, 1940. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 7, 2022. Retrieved May 14, 2022.
  13. ^ "Transit Unification Completed As City Takes Over I. R. T. Lines: Systems Come Under Single Control After Efforts Begun in 1921; Mayor Is Jubilant at City Hall Ceremony Recalling 1904 Celebration". New York Herald Tribune. June 13, 1940. p. 25. ProQuest 1248134780.
  14. ^ Brown, Nicole (May 17, 2019). "How did the MTA subway lines get their letter or number? NYCurious". amNewYork. Archived from the original on March 2, 2021. Retrieved January 27, 2021.
  15. ^ Friedlander, Alex; Lonto, Arthur; Raudenbush, Henry (April 1960). "A Summary of Services on the IRT Division, NYCTA" (PDF). New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 3 (1): 2–3. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 14, 2020. Retrieved January 27, 2021.
  16. ^ "Direct Subway Runs To Flushing, Astoria" (PDF). The New York Times. October 15, 1949. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 7, 2017.
  17. ^ Bennett, Charles G. (November 20, 1949). "Transit Platforms On Lines In Queens To Be Lengthened; $3,850,000 Program Outlined for Next Year to Care for Borough's Rapid Growth New Links Are To Be Built 400 More Buses to Roll Also — Bulk of Work to Be on Corona-Flushing Route Transit Program In Queens Outlined". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 29, 2018.
  18. ^ "37 Platforms On Subways To Be Lengthened: All Stations of B. M. T. and I.R.T.in Queens Included in $5,000,000 Program". New York Herald Tribune. November 20, 1949. p. 32. ISSN 1941-0646. ProQuest 1325174459.
  19. ^ Minutes and Proceedings of the New York City Transit Authority. New York City Transit Authority. 1955. Archived from the original on September 13, 2020. Retrieved August 31, 2016.
  20. ^ "R17s to the Flushing Line". New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association. 5 (6): M-8. December 1962 – via Issu.
  21. ^ "TA to Show Fair Train". Long Island Star – Journal. August 31, 1963. Retrieved August 30, 2016 – via Fulton History.
  22. ^ "A First-class Rapid Ride". Railway Age. Vol. 156, no. 21. June 1, 1964. p. 22. ProQuest 895766286.
  23. ^ Murray, Christian (November 19, 2019). "MTA To Overhaul Six Stations on the 7 Line, Currently in Design Phase". Sunnyside Post. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  24. ^ Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  25. ^ Cox, Jeremiah. "103 Street-Corona Plaza (7) - The SubwayNut". www.subwaynut.com. Archived from the original on June 15, 2017. Retrieved February 18, 2016.
  26. ^ "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Corona" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 5, 2017. Retrieved September 20, 2015.
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